Jump to content
Science Forums

How do you see the precession of Venus?


Recommended Posts

I have noticed that the Venus precession data 8.6" obtained by GR calculation is very inconsistent with actual observations. Is there any accurate data now? I also calculated the precession data of the eight major planets in the solar system.

Mercury 43”
Venus 240”
Earth 3”
Mars 1”
Jupiter 0.8”
Saturn 0.1
Except for Venus which is 240", other data are consistent with GR. I want to know which of 8.6" vs 240" is correct.

My email : [email protected]
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Huh? The precession of planets are well understood, Mercury was the first planet to have its precession accurately explained by Gravity, what precession are you talking about, and why are you talking about it? The posts I've read in my time today are so unclear, I am wondering what it is half the time the OP's are trying to articulate? If I cannot understand, that is not a good start. I only wonder, if a system of questions are not articulated properly, what are others thinking outside of my own reading of trying to understand.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/28/2021 at 12:23 AM, TonyYuan2020 said:
I have noticed that the Venus precession data 8.6" obtained by GR calculation is very inconsistent with actual observations. Is there any accurate data now? I also calculated the precession data of the eight major planets in the solar system.

Mercury 43”
Venus 240”
Earth 3”
Mars 1”
Jupiter 0.8”
Saturn 0.1
Except for Venus which is 240", other data are consistent with GR. I want to know which of 8.6" vs 240" is correct.

My email : [email protected]

One way to calculate the precession of the planets is by averaging the interplanetary gravitational interactions over the orbits of the other planets. It is reasonable to do this, since the precession period in question is very much longer than the orbital period of any planet in the Solar System. Thus, by treating the other planets as rings, we can calculate the mean gravitational perturbation due to these planets, and, thereby, determine the desired precession rate.

 

However, since Venus rotates much more slowly than any other planet, its precession period cannot be accurately calculated by the above method. With a rotation period of 243 Earth days, it takes longer to rotate about its axis than any other planet in the Solar System by far. Venus rotates clockwise in retrograde rotation once every 243 Earth days—the slowest rotation of any planet.

Therefore, the calculated and observed precession rates of Venus are not in perfect agreement:

Venus: observed 2.04     Calculated 10.75   arc seconds per year.

But they are not nearly as far off as what you wrote. In fact, you have been pushing this same nonsense on this forum for quite a long time and it has been explained to you several times why you are wrong.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...