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I also think that looking at these videos can help:

That's a great sentiment, but that's not what is lacking.  The reason this hasn't been done before is not that a dedicated group of game designers and testers and managers haven't come together to mak

@TheSoloPlayer yes im sure laser would decresse heat but im sure it would harm human too. VR shouldnt be harmfull for human body. Heating problem is for any device but for add laser for cooling cpu fi

Yes... It would take several thousands of electrodes to connect to different nerves and stimulate them to see objects in a game.. So that would bring us straight to some type of wireless connection...

Most or all present-day medical electrode systems intended to be permanently (“chronically”) implanted, such as the previously mentioned Argus II and the Braingate (not a vision, but a prosthetic control, system) use a wireless connection. This is because it’s difficult to avoid injury, infection, and wear-and-tear with wires piercing the skin (“percutaneous”). It’s a pretty mature technology, because one of the major challenges with implanted wireless devices, powering or charging batteries in the implanted part of the system, were solved many years ago for implanted heart pacemakers.

 

So the connection problem for implanted electrodes is pretty well solved. The major remaining problems for a system with many times more electrodes than present-day systems are miniaturization, and how to place them. Presently, placing electrodes in the brain, eye, or other nerves requires surgery.

 

I think electromagnet should read/writte.

I wonder if electromagnetism can stimulate the nerves and neuron's to be able to see and hear.

In short, magnetic fields can’t effect nerves like this. For a longer explanation, see this post.
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The major remaining problems for a system with many times more electrodes than present-day systems are miniaturization, and how to place them. Presently, placing electrodes in the brain, eye, or other nerves requires surgery.

@craigD hmm surgery would be only way to do this?

At present, the only way to implant electrodes is surgery, at the hands of a skilled surgeon. It’s easier to implant electrodes in the retina than in the brain because it’s easier to cut open the eye than the skull. It’s also easier to implant electrodes in muscular nerves, because in that case, only the skin and underlying tissue needs to be cut.

 

I hope that, in the future, it will be possible to quickly (60 sec or less) implant many (10000+) electrodes in the brain or other tissues using nanomachines. I’ve described this approach in many posts, such as this one.

 

Or we could example add it in device for stimulate it?

Answering this question with a self-quote:

Though present day noninvasive technologies such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can read and write to the brain, their resolution, especially the “writing” via TMS, is too low resolution for a computer-brain interface.

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At present, the only way to implant electrodes is surgery, at the hands of a skilled surgeon. It’s easier to implant electrodes in the retina than in the brain because it’s easier to cut open the eye than the skull. It’s also easier to implant electrodes in muscular nerves, because in that case, only the skin and underlying tissue needs to be cut.

 

I hope that, in the future, it will be possible to quickly (60 sec or less) implant many (10000+) electrodes in the brain or other tissues using nanomachines. I’ve described this approach in many posts, such as this one.

 

Answering this question with a self-quote:

So is there anyway to make the writing to the brain any better with TMS? And is TMS noninvasive?

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Probably get a medical degree, with a specialty in surgery (particularly neuro-surgery).  Alternatively you could go for a PhD in neuroscience.

I like the way you are thinking, but I am talking specifically to the development to the nervegear device. I already am learning about neuroscience and I was trying to find a way to do everything non invasively like in the anime and light novels. @pgrmdave

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Yes I agree. But the big question is: Where and what do we start with involving this project?

 Well I have an Idea of making a basic Full Dive Vr. But first I will want to patent the idea and the problem is that it is not a nerve gear type device... You will be awake but I have covered almost all aspects of the device. Another problem is that it requires a room instead of being a device that sits on your head like a helmet...

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 A possible start before anything is to work out the brain functions and how the device will be able to communicate to the brain and most certainly, disable the body. I think that a possible start is to develop nano technology. This way, if we can't figure out how to make the device communicate to the brain and make it "obey" the input of visual data, we would already make the first nano technology, small enough to pass through veins and communicate with nerves that it can be used for medical purposes such as curing cancer.

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 A possible start before anything is to work out the brain functions and how the device will be able to communicate to the brain and most certainly, disable the body. I think that a possible start is to develop nano technology. This way, if we can't figure out how to make the device communicate to the brain and make it "obey" the input of visual data, we would already make the first nano technology, small enough to pass through veins and communicate with nerves that it can be used for medical purposes such as curing cancer.

 

Ok. So, I think that is a good lace to start, come up with an idea that we could use to disable the body and write to the brain. I think that the best way to write to the brain would be to use the nerves because it would be a lot safer than writing directly to the brain and we could just stimulate the nerve/nerve fibers with pulses of electricity, possibly from transceivers. Let's focus on doing this first, as it would be better taking this one at a time. Does that not seem like the best method of approach? If not, I would love to hear what yo guys think.

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I already am learning about neuroscience and I was trying to find a way to do everything non invasively like in the anime and light novels. @pgrmdave

A lot of sci fi is more fiction than science. Don't be surprised if at the end of your journey you discover that it was impossible all along. http://smbc-comics.com/index.php?id=3766

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A lot of sci fi is more fiction than science. Don't be surprised if at the end of your journey you discover that it was impossible all along. http://smbc-comics.com/index.php?id=3766

Lol @pgrmdave I loved the little comic. But I am aware of the fact that it could possibly turn out exactly like the anime or manga, as most of the things that I have tried in life haven't turned out like I planned, but it is always best to try.

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