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New Words For 2014


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Merriam-Webster has updated their dictionary to reflect the addition of over 150 new words to the English vocabulary. Take a look for yourself and see how you feel about their additions: http://finance.yahoo.com/news/merriam-websters-collegiate-dictionary-updated-140000982.html

 

I think slang words like "Yooper" need to be excluded as I see no constructive use in learning it.

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... 
I think slang words like "Yooper" need to be excluded as I see no constructive use in learning it.


Nonsense. Dictionaries are constantly updated to reflect words in usage as well as words that have become archaic. People use dictionaries to learn what words mean that they run across in reading or conversation as well as to learn word pronunciations. :read:

yooper

(yo̅o̅′pər)
n. Michigan & Northern Wisconsin
A native or inhabitant of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.


and...

yooper

Yooper is a common term for residents of the Upper Penisula of Michigan. It is derived from the initials U.P. which is pronounced you-pee. U.P. stands for Upper Peninsula, as opposed to the lower peninsula of Michigan.

It is not a derogortory term. It is used mainly by residents of lower Michigan and Wisconsin.

That person is a yooper from Escanaba, Michigan.

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Sometimes I hate that they include slang especially if I think it could be temporary, but I agree with your reasoning Turtle.


I think we have to trust the dictionary writers. They are the experts after all and I doubt that the majority of them have anything but love for words. When words fall out of use they get an Archaic notation, which seems fitting because the words can still be found in 'historic' writings. Removing such words would stymy research and obfuscate the meanings and intent of historical work. :sherlock: 

Try reading Shakespeare without a good dictionary. :vava:
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Your use of the word obfuscate, not one in everybody's daily vocabulary, reminded me of a technical writer I knew some years ago. Keep in mind technical writers are meant to bring clarity and simplicity to their writing. He had a prominent framed sign in his office that said Eschew Obfuscation. Brilliant!
 

 

Try reading Shakespeare without a good dictionary.

Try writing a good dictionary without Shakespeare.

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Usually attributed to Mark Twain but he said something slightly different.

If you are American everything is attributed to Mark Twain. If you are British it is to Oscar Wilde.

 

"To use the work of one person is stealing; to use the work of several people is research; to use the work of no one is madness."

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Your use of the word obfuscate, not one in everybody's daily vocabulary, reminded me of a technical writer I knew some years ago. Keep in mind technical writers are meant to bring clarity and simplicity to their writing. He had a prominent framed sign in his office that said Eschew Obfuscation. Brilliant!
 

Try writing a good dictionary without Shakespeare.

 

 

Eschew Obfuscation, that is terrific. I agree that the dictionaries need to be updated with current vocabulary, but I cringe at some of the slang that is allowed. What a reflection on English speaking society and an interesting one at that. Personally, although I feel somewhat "current", I would need a dictionary for some of today's words...

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I think it is an error to view the slang as being allowed. A dictionary seeks to reflect and document usage. It does not make a judgement about what is "correct", only what is "commonplace". Moreover, colloquial or slang usage is typically identified as such. Today's slang either perishes, or becomes tomorrow's standard. Language is a living thing.

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  • 1 month later...

I think it is an error to view the slang as being allowed. A dictionary seeks to reflect and document usage. It does not make a judgement about what is "correct", only what is "commonplace". Moreover, colloquial or slang usage is typically identified as such. Today's slang either perishes, or becomes tomorrow's standard. Language is a living thing.

 

As a living language, it will grow and likely go off in some directions that purists may feel it shouldn't. I too struggle sometimes with slang words being included in the "official" dictionaries. But I sure don't envy the job of the dictionary editors, having to try and judge which words will stick around (have or add value) and which ones won't.

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