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Operational notes: the Wildflower social group has more or less died on the vine so to speak (:doh:), and as wildflowers have my current attention this new thread seems suiting. since all flowers ulti

Using FF too, and the link wors for me.   Little off topic. I'm not a great fan of roses, but find the "old", "native" rose species, which has a more simple flower structure than garden roses, quite

alas i still have not made it afield, but maybe tomorrow. still, i didn't have to trek any further than my backyard for this captive native. i first encountered it in my exploration and study of lecht

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ok; i think i have the mystery flowers/plant id'd. tricky, because the plant is dioecious. my specimen is a boy. :rant: :boy: :doh: :hihi: :lol: will wait for another nod from freezy et al before adding id info to images. :) :yes: :cap:

 

western meadow-rue -Thalictrum occidentale

:) Rue was the first word that came to my mind when I saw those leaves. But just as suddenly, I began to doubt that common name. Searching for "rue" on the internet immediately revealed my doubt to be well founded. I'm not sure how that name got mixed into American botanical (common name) nomenclature, but there it is. /:)

 

The flowers in the link you gave are not very convincing for the yet-to-bloom-looking "blooms" in your pics.

 

I've got the ID, but you're so close that I'd hate to spoil it. :kuku:

 

Hint: Thalictrum is correct.

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:evil: Rue was the first word that came to my mind when I saw those leaves. But just as suddenly, I began to doubt that common name. Searching for "rue" on the internet immediately revealed my doubt to be well founded. I'm not sure how that name got mixed into American botanical (common name) nomenclature, but there it is. /:)

 

The flowers in the link you gave are not very convincing for the yet-to-bloom-looking "blooms" in your pics.

 

I've got the ID, but you're so close that I'd hate to spoil it. :rotfl:

 

Hint: Thalictrum is correct.

 

spoil it! spoil it! i've run myself ragged & come up empty even with the hint. so many more new flowers to come :shrug: ; have mercy. :shrug:

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I am way out of my league here, but according to the USDA site, I think Turtle's on the wrong side of the Rockies for it to be Thalictrum dioicum?

 

PLANTS Profile for Thalictrum dioicum (early meadow-rue) | USDA PLANTS

 

:shrug:

 

You are correct. The distribution map doesn't align with the sighting area.

 

First, USDA's site, while invaluable, is notoriously wrong when it comes to distributions. There are random quirks in nature that can't well be described with overarching efficiency through the USDA species distribution maps. I've talked with quite a few botanists that have major issues with this. One of them actually participated in the USDA committee for many years. (Robert Mohlenbrock) :shrug:

 

Second, you very well may be right, JMJ. :evil:

It looks like T. fendleri is a contender that makes more sense geographically.

 

A recent photo (more flowering) would help tons, I think. What says you mista Turtl? :rotfl:

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...Second, you very well may be right, JMJ. ;)

It looks like T. fendleri is a contender that makes more sense geographically.

 

A recent photo (more flowering) would help tons, I think. What says you mista Turtl? :)

 

roger; will get new shots. :P i will also call it "meadowrue" and like it! :lol:

 

on to those new flowers i promised. :lol: i have been staying pretty local to the greater metropolitan vancouver usa area, but yesterday racoon san coaxed me up into the hills of the great columbia river gorge. we hiked more than 7 miles around gillette lake in skamania county, and to say i am tuckered is a gross misunderstatement. good times though!! :frown: anyway, the rarest flowers we found, i.e. new to me, produced the worst photos i now find. :doh: nonetheless, i got some useables. :lol: on we go thens with this beautimous & interesteous native wildflower....:blink:

 

Achlys triphylla - WTU Herbarium Image Collection

 

vanillaleaf - Achlys triphylla (aka sweet-after-death, deer's-foot )

april 16, 2010

gillette lake

skamania county washington

 

 

ethnobotanical uses:

results of search

Infusion of leaves taken for tuberculosis...Decoction of leaves used as a hair wash...Infusion of smashed plants taken as an emetic...Strained infusion of dried, shredded roots used as a wash for cataracts...Decoction of plant used as a furniture and floor wash for lice, bedbugs and other household pests...Decoction of roots used as a delousing wash for sheep...Leaves dried and hung in houses to keep flies and mosquitos away.

 

bloom detail:

 

full-plant view:

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we have three species of this native plant; this one is distinct for its small/short size and the numerous leaflets on each leaf. the red on the flowers also seems exclusive to this one. :lol: :lol:

 

Berberis nervosa - WTU Herbarium Image Collection

 

ethnobotanical uses:

Used as a laxative...Decoction of peeled, chopped rootbark used as wash for arthritis...Decoction of peeled, chopped rootbark taken as a blood tonic....Infusion of woody stems and bark used as an eyewash for red, itchy eyes...Plant induced dreams of someone sleeping when brought into the house...Decoction of peeled, chopped roots taken for syphilis...Nitinaht Dye from roots (Yellow)...Berries used to make jelly.
source

 

cascade oregon-grape - Berberis nervosa (aka dull oregon-grape)

april 16, 2010

gillette lake area

skamania county washington - native

 

bloom detail:

 

whole-plant view:

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we saw a fair number of these fairy slippers after spotting this first small group of about a dozen. :clue: sorry for the gnarly old hand in the bloom shot, but the camera was being finicky and wanted to focus on the background; i hate that!! :rant: anyway, i stuck my paw in there to leave it little choice. :hihi: :turtle: :photos:

 

 

Calypso bulbosa - WTU Herbarium Image Collection

 

ethnobotanical uses:

Bulbs chewed or flowers sucked for mild epilepsy...Plants used as charms for unspecified purpose
source

 

fairy slipper - Calypso bulbosa

april 16, 2010

gillette lake area

skamania county washington - native

 

bloom detail:

 

whole-plant view:

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:rant:

...

Second, you very well may be right, JMJ. :cheer:

It looks like T. fendleri is a contender that makes more sense geographically.

 

A recent photo (more flowering) would help tons, I think. What says you mista Turtl? :cheer:

 

okaly dokaly. :) finally got that shot of the flowering of the meadowrue. :photos: darn frilly-lacy-dangly things don't give much for the camera to get a focus on (:clue:) so the most forward boy-bloom is a little fuzzy. who we gonna call? :hihi: :turtle:

 

 

western meadow-rue - Thalictrum occidentale

male plant

april 17, 2010

suburbia

clark county washington - native

 

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alrighty thens; back to friday's field trip. while this first photo wouldn't be wrong in the Interesting Geology thread, it's right enough here to set the scene. the view is looking up the columbia river into the columbia gorge. the massive just left of center is beacon rock, a basalt volcanic neck. just upstream & around the bend is bonneville dam. our gillette lake trail is just past beacon rock and inland. the trail head elevation was just under 300 feet, and we climbed as high as 800 feet.

 

 

now fo sum mo wild frowers. :photos: this is another native from the lily family, and we found it growing abundantly in the area. :turtle: :clue: :hihi:

 

Prosartes hookeri - WTU Herbarium Image Collection

 

hooker fairy-bell - Prosartes hookeri

april 16, 2010

gillette lake area

skamania county washington - native

 

blooms:

 

whole plant:

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on the way in, i constantly stopped every 30 feet or so to photograph another flower. :kick: well, racoon soon got tired of that stopping & began walking ahead & leaving me to catch up. :photos: :hihi: anyway, i found him 'round one bend gazing off trail with a grin and then pointing when he saw me racing up. :rant: :cheer: now i neglected to get a shot of the whole plant, & maybe rac san did or did not, but it was stupendous, carrying hundreds if not thousands of blooms. it was rougly globose in form with a height & breadth of 40 feet or more, and growing beneath a canopy of doug fir. :eek: :tree: :turtle:

 

now i did get some fuzzy shots of a bloom and the characteristic leaves; either the wind was blowing, or i was shaking, or possibly both. :clue: :cheer: :) at any rate, the apparent white "petals" are modified leaves and may number as many as 6; the actual "flowers" are the little nubblins in the middle. :clue: (my lone pine trees & shrubs of washington field-guide notes the 4 to 6 petals, and the petal/leaves is mentioned in my reader's digest north american wildlife guide.)

 

Cornus nuttallii - WTU Herbarium Image Collection

 

nuttall's dogwood - Cornus nuttallii (aka western flowering dogwood, mountain dogwood, & pacific dogwood)

april 16, 2010

gillette lake area

skamania county washington - native

 

bloom:

 

leaf & twig detail:

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another serviceable tree we found in bloom is the saskatoon, aka serviceberry. :doh: :) this particular tree is young and getting a jump in some open area cleared by logging. not sure if this gillette lake area was part of the Yacolt Burn, the worst forest fire in our state's history, but virtually all the timber i saw is second growth stuff. i saw some charcoaled logs, but there have been fires since the 1902 conflagration as well. :lol: remember, you sometimes can prevent forest fires. :fire: (contrary to smoky the bear's admonition, "only you can prevent forest fires", you may not be able to at all & there are others who may or may not be able to prevent forest fires as well. start a meme; burn a bear. :eek: :hyper:)

 

ethnobotony: the fruits are edible and ethnobotanists have recorded hundreds of uses for the plant by native americans. i'll just give a link & spare y'all the verbose list here. >> ethnobotany of saskatoon

 

oh yeah; the frowers. :jab: :lol: :naughty:

 

Amelanchier alnifolia - WTU Herbarium Image Collection

 

saskatoon - Amelanchier alnifolia (aka serviceberry, western serviceberry)

april 16, 2010

gillette lake area

skamania county washington - native

 

blooms:

 

whole plant:

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okaly dokaly. from the gillette lake area abreast the great columbia river gorge, another mystery flower for you flower sleuths. :eek: :lol:

 

but first, another scenic shot to set the scene of the mystery bloom. this is the oft mentioned gillette lake, about 2.5 miles hike from the trailhead. i can't recall the trail name, a native american word, but racoon told me the area was used by native americans as a place to send their children on vision quests. :fire: :naughty:

 

 

so thens, either a pea vine or a vetch, either native or introduced. :) these plants were numerous & height about 2 feet. from the photos i have noted the leaflets are alternate, leaflets stemless, as many as 12 leaflets per leaf, the leaflets have a little bristle or spine at the tip, & the leaves end in branched tendrils. :jab: the color & other details of the bloom speak for themselves, so i'll note that i see four blooms on the close-up and 6 un-opened blooms on a stalk in the background of the whole-plant view. :lol:

 

won't you, help a novice like me?? :hyper:

 

blooms:

 

whole plant:

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so thens & well nows & now thens dear tender juicy well-marbled readers & voyeurs, i have trod afield afar anew. the trodding is my therapy, the photos yours. this time, 2 days into the great gifford pinchot national forest to an elevation of ~ 1600 feet. this is gonna take a few days....... :turtle: :bouquet: :photos:

 

 

Lysichiton americanus - WTU Herbarium Image Collection

 

skunk cabbage - Lysichiton americanus (aka american skunk cabbage, yellow skunk cabbage)

april 22, 2010

sunset falls

gifford pinchot national forest

skamania county washington - native

 

blooms:

 

whole plant:

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