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Operational notes: the Wildflower social group has more or less died on the vine so to speak (:doh:), and as wildflowers have my current attention this new thread seems suiting. since all flowers ulti

Using FF too, and the link wors for me.   Little off topic. I'm not a great fan of roses, but find the "old", "native" rose species, which has a more simple flower structure than garden roses, quite

alas i still have not made it afield, but maybe tomorrow. still, i didn't have to trek any further than my backyard for this captive native. i first encountered it in my exploration and study of lecht

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i have a new secret forest to explorest. :tree: :bow: lots of old friends, and perchance some new. :secret: :shrug:

 

id keys for this trillium are both the leaves and flower on stalks. :clue: i suspect the lobed-leaf plant just behind the trilliums is sitka vallerian. :photos:

 

so we goes. . . . . :turtle: :tree:

 

Trillium ovatum - WTU Herbarium Image Collection

 

western trillium -Trillium ovatum (aka pacific trillium, coast trillium, white trillium, western wake-robin)

march 18, 2010

whipple creek park

clark county washington - native

 

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woo hoo!! :):evil: found this rare trillium budding in a secret location. :secret:

 

i have had some problems id'ing these over the years, and it's not even listed in my washington wildflower fieldguide. besides the western trillium in the last post, the fieldguide lists "sessile" trillium, which i find is aka "giant trillium", & both demoninated Trillium chloropetalum. however, and apparently, the flowers of giant-trillium are never white, and what's more i now find small-flowered trillium has been historically called "Trillium chloropetalum". :shrug:

Comments: This species will key to Trillium chloropetalum in Hitchcock and Cronquist 1973.
http://www1.dnr.wa.gov/nhp/refdesk/fguide/pdf/trpa.pdf

 

anyway, i will get some shots of the open bloom(s) when they...erhm....open. :turtle: :photos: :phones:

 

(click thumbnails to open full-size images in new window.)

bud detail:

 

stem detail:

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it was raining today so i decided to take a walk & have a look for the rare small-flowered trillium in a public place.:) found it! just one specimen for my trouble though; about 1/2 mile down from the north terminus and 30 feet east of the heritage trail, clark county washington. :phones:

 

 

Lacamas Heritage Trail

 

YouTube - Rare Small-flowered Trillium - Trillium parviflorum http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dbWT7tdgQ44

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many of these blooming along the wooded banks of lacamas creek adjoining the lacamas heritage trail. i'd say definitely a kittentail, genus Synthyris. i suspect the species is reniformis. i see S. missurica as another possibility. :phones: thoughts? beautiful little things. :) :kuku: ;) :rotfl:

 

Synthyris reniformis - WTU Herbarium Image Collection

 

snow queen - Synthyris reniformis (aka round-leaved kittentails)

march 12, 2010

lacamas heritage trail

clark county washington - native

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this little thing is... verry hard to photograph. not only is it small, the sepals & petals are extremely short-lived. gotta get what you can while you can though, and this is what i got in my can. :agree: :tree::photos:

 

Ranunculus uncinatus - WTU Herbarium Image Collection

 

Flowers: Pedicles single-flowered, up to 6 cm. long; sepals 5, spreading to reflexed, 1.5-3 mm. long, quickly deciduous; petals 5, yellow, 2-3 mm .long; nectary scale ...

 

woodland buttercup - Ranunculus uncinatus (aka little buttercup)

march 16, 2010

lacamas heritage trail

clark county washington - native

*petals (the two left :rant:) measure 2mm long.)

 

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went walkabout with a friendly raccoon; got some new stuff. :cap: we have a number of yellow violets in washington but i think this one is the pioneer violet. :photos: (possibly evergreen violet?) by all means please inform me if i have erred in my id. :shrug: :shrug: :D :phones:

 

 

Viola glabella - WTU Herbarium Image Collection

 

pioneer violet - Viola glabella

march 18, 2010

whipple creek park

clark county washington - native

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moving on thens, this is the last flower photo from the 18th walkabout. :turtle: :agree: while the new & few leaves don't look like what i expect for common hawthorn, the singular style is definitive. this is an introduced species, and our other 2 native hawthorns have 5 styles, and so five pips, rather than the one of common, or oneseed, hawthorn. :shrug:

 

Crataegus monogyna - WTU Herbarium Image Collection

...Flowers: Inflorescence a broad, dense, flat-topped cluster; flowers 8-15 mm. wide, the petals white; style 1. ...

 

common hawthorn - Crataegus monogyna (aka oneseed hawthorn)

march 18, 2010

whipple creek park

clark county washington - introduced

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went walkabout with a friendly raccoon; got some new stuff. :cap: we have a number of yellow violets in washington but i think this one is the pioneer violet. :photos: (possibly evergreen violet?) by all means please inform me if i have erred in my id. :sherlock: :naughty: :D :bouquet:

 

It's hard to tell from the photo, but it looks like the violet in your picture is puberulent. Hmmm...I see both suspects are listed as puberulent by the herbarium, so no help there. Perhaps the seed is the best distinguisher for this species. :shrug: Though, judging from many pictures, I would lean in favor of pioneer violet from a purely internet-image-search-macroscopic-subjection. ;)

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found a group of 70 or more of these growing in a running rivulet. :photos: i suspect they are a species of buttercup, but i find no good matches in my field guides. :cap: :bouquet: ;) :D :sherlock: ideas? :shrug: :naughty:

 

Buttercups have very distinct leaves. I don't see any buttercup leaves in the photos (lots of violets). Do you have a shot of the leaves?

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It's hard to tell from the photo, but it looks like the violet in your picture is puberulent. Hmmm...I see both suspects are listed as puberulent by the herbarium, so no help there. Perhaps the seed is the best distinguisher for this species. :cap: Though, judging from many pictures, I would lean in favor of pioneer violet from a purely internet-image-search-macroscopic-subjection. ;)

 

roger. the leaves of evergreen violet described as leathery; my specimen, not so. also, evergreen violet has beards on the lateral pair of petals; my specimen not. pioneer , aka spring, violet it is then! :naughty:

 

found a group of 70 or more of these growing in a running rivulet. i suspect they are a species of buttercup, but i find no good matches in my field guides. ideas?

 

Buttercups have very distinct leaves. I don't see any buttercup leaves in the photos (lots of violets). Do you have a shot of the leaves?

 

erhm...the second shot is a shot of the leaves. (post #93 ) let me look if i have another....processing....accessing....drinking....buzzing....whirring... :lol: nope; that's my best shot of the leaves. note my finger for scale; it is...erhm...finger size. :doh: ;) i put the flower width at about 60 mm (~2 1/2 inches). i don't see anything violet-y about this one. :sherlock: i agree the leaves don't look buttercup-y either, which is what has me stumped inasmuch as the flower screams buttercup. :D :D hold on & let me get a closeup of the bloom that i haven't posted. :shrug: brb . . . . :photos:

 

okaly dokaly. might want some dark glasses on. :bouquet:

 

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Ok, I see the leaves now. They are clasping and toothy.

 

I have no idea other than to say that it is not a buttercup. I'll see if I can find out.

 

roger. i appreciate it. :clue: note however that not all the leaves are clasping. :turtle: while the flower stalks appear to have a clasping leaf, the other leaves there are heart-shaped & terminal on a petiole. :sherlock:

 

so we goes. :bouquet: :)

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while we puzzle over the id of the mystery 5-petalled-yellow-flower-growing-in-a-stream, i thought i'd put up an older photo of one of our native hawthorns as counterpoint to the introduced species i posted in #94. while i can only see 4 stamens, there are five, and clearly at least, not one. :lol: i shot this may 2008 in lechtenberg park, clark county washington. :shrug: :tree:

 

Crataegus douglasii - WTU Herbarium Image Collection

 

black hawthorn - Crataegus douglasii (aka Douglas' hawthorn)

may 2008

lechtenberg park

clark county washington - native

 

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i returned to the lacamas heritage trail and tracked down 3 "clonal groups" of the rare small-flowered trillium. :tree: :( i have more information on the rarity (fewer than 100 instances known globally. :Alien:), habit, etc. in the lechtenberg park thread on this species in posts #425 & #426. >> Environmental Study of Lechtenberg Park

 

the group below is growing under a garry oak tree, and in association with fringecup - Tellima grandiflora. (6" divisions on scale stick in foreground :hyper:) some individuals have no bloom; not sure if they broke off or if they never were there? :QuestionM :turtle:

 

small-flowered trillium - Trillium parviflorum Soukup

march 26, 2010

lacamas heritage trail

clark county washington - native (state ranked Sensitive)

 

clonal group of ~. 20 individuals:

 

detail of a bloom:

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