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Hypo Jazz Ensemble


TheBigDog
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Bravo on the revival!

 

I'll work on some drums for this, shouldn't be too hard.

What I would recommend is taking the drum track and redoing the whistle part to the drum track as the timing is a little off in parts.

 

I should be able to have something worked out by tonight. :eek2:

 

You're ON. :):):):):):):)

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Ok, here's a version with drums added. As you can hear, the whistling goes out of sync after the first few bars. I matched the beat up with the first few bars which ended up being 77BPM. So I'm also including the drum track so you can whistle the tune in sync Pyro. After we have the whistling in sync, then I'll go back and make the drums more interesting.

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Well,

this thread really died out. What a shame.

 

It's not avant guarde, or even modern, but I made up a tune.

It seems to me it would make a good theme song for Hypography.

 

Hypo Theme, take 1... If someone wants to add a DRUM track to this, please feel free to do so. :hihi:

 

I can barely pick up a tune let alone carry one. :hihi: Sorry if I dropped the ball on any toes. :hihi:

 

I really like the 'trills' in there Pyro. Is that the right term? Warbles? :hihi: Last night I was watching a tape of a band performing at a local open-air festival and the lead singer busted up some bad-*** picaloing during one of the songs. First thing to pop into my head was 'Winston'. :hihi:

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...I really like the 'trills' in there Pyro. Is that the right term? Warbles? :eek_big: ...'Winston'. :)
Not exactly a trill. A warble is more like it. The warble is made by changing the shape of my cheeks for just an instant. The energy going into the primary note suddenly shifts into a harmonic and back. If I could do 3 or more warbles in series, then it would be a trill. :turtle:

 

Winston Marsalis???

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Not exactly a trill. A warble is more like it. The warble is made by changing the shape of my cheeks for just an instant. The energy going into the primary note suddenly shifts into a harmonic and back. If I could do 3 or more warbles in series, then it would be a trill. :turtle:

 

That is so cool, Pyro!

I've never thought about warbling in such a way, I've always just taken it "as is". I guess I would explain a warble as a quick fluctuation of pitches/octaves in series, but your description is much better and I gleaned some puccolo knowledge. :hihi:

Winston Marsalis???

 

Do you mean Wynton Marsalis? :doh:

 

BTW, where is the new whistle track, PyroT? I'm eagerly awaiting it! :)

 

The Hypo Jazz Ensemble must be formed!!

Who else is in? :eek_big:

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That is so cool, Pyro!...where is the new whistle track, PyroT? I'm eagerly awaiting it! :)
Thank you!

 

The new whistle track will have to wait a few days. My mother is spending the weekend here. She hasn't seen our new house. BTW, my mom is 82 years old, and still holds down a part-time job.

 

Whistling could actually be analyzed as a bio-technology. It took years to extend my range nearly one octave down into low notes (with any volume) and to extend another octave beyond my highest note. The latter, I accomplished by learning to over-blow, just like on a flute. This yields (on the flute) an additional swath of notes exactly one octave above the original fingerings. In whistling, it gives me a swath of higher pitched notes about a fifth (I mean, 5 notes) above the original tonguing.

 

By using the forces that resonant notes cause on the inner cheek, I can make my cheeks "pop" out slightly, giving me a different kind of harmonic resonance. Up about a third. The new note doesn't press in the same spots, allowing me to "pop" the cheek back into place, returning to the original note. This is the warble. I can, in fact, do two warbles in fast succession. Three takes a lot of practice and high humidity.

 

I can do a variable tremelo ('tremble') by oscillating the muscles in my lips and the tip of the tongue. I can vary this over quite a range until the notes shake around like an opera singer's voice.

 

I can vary the attack on the notes to the point where it's true staccato, hitting each note with no need to 'slide' into the right pitch. This took a loooong time to learn.

 

The most important trick I have is that I whistle IN and OUT almost equally well. This means I can seamlessly whistle looooooong passages of music without ever taking a breath.

 

I can hum and whistle at the same time, though this takes awesome concentration. I can whistle a sliding note up half an octave while humming down half an octave, making for a sound that ought to be used in a Science Fiction movie for a ray gun or transporter.

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Thank you!

 

The new whistle track will have to wait a few days. My mother is spending the weekend here. She hasn't seen our new house. BTW, my mom is 82 years old, and still holds down a part-time job.

 

Whistling could actually be analyzed as a bio-technology. It took years to extend my range nearly one octave down into low notes (with any volume) and to extend another octave beyond my highest note. The latter, I accomplished by learning to over-blow, just like on a flute. This yields (on the flute) an additional swath of notes exactly one octave above the original fingerings. In whistling, it gives me a swath of higher pitched notes about a fifth (I mean, 5 notes) above the original tonguing.

 

By using the forces that resonant notes cause on the inner cheek, I can make my cheeks "pop" out slightly, giving me a different kind of harmonic resonance. Up about a third. The new note doesn't press in the same spots, allowing me to "pop" the cheek back into place, returning to the original note. This is the warble. I can, in fact, do two warbles in fast succession. Three takes a lot of practice and high humidity.

 

Wow! :hihi:

 

I can do a variable tremelo ('tremble') by oscillating the muscles in my lips and the tip of the tongue. I can vary this over quite a range until the notes shake around like an opera singer's voice.

 

I'll make sure my girlfriend doesn't read this... :turtle:

I can vary the attack on the notes to the point where it's true staccato, hitting each note with no need to 'slide' into the right pitch. This took a loooong time to learn.

 

As a wannabee-amateur-whistler, I can appreciate the learning curve.

The most important trick I have is that I whistle IN and OUT almost equally well. This means I can seamlessly whistle looooooong passages of music without ever taking a breath.

 

I can whistle in and out as well, though it's not controlled enough to qualify as circular breathing.

 

I can hum and whistle at the same time, though this takes awesome concentration. I can whistle a sliding note up half an octave while humming down half an octave, making for a sound that ought to be used in a Science Fiction movie for a ray gun or transporter.

 

:)

I want to hear this whistle up half octave vs. hum down half octave combo! :eek_big:

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