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Quirky History facts!


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#1 Boerseun

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Posted 10 June 2006 - 02:37 AM

As a spinoff from the Quirky Science thread, here's one on History!

First one:

The fruit symbols on slot machines are there because they were initially designed as 'vending machines' to get past the law! And what you got was different fruit-flavoured bubblegum! And the symbols have stuck till this day.

#2 Turtle

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Posted 10 June 2006 - 05:54 PM

The phrase "just joshing you" comes from a guy named Josh plating the new US nickel in 1883 with gold & passing them off as $5 gold pieces. The original coin didn't have the word "cents" on it, just the Roman Numeral V. They stopped production & added "cents". Josh got off with a stern look as he never asked for change or otherwise said "here's five dollars".:eek2:

#3 Boerseun

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 04:42 AM

The term "Black-balling" somebody, or "Being Black-balled", comes from an old Freemasonry practice when electing new members.

Current members would elect a new member by throwing either a white or a black ball in a box, and the new guy become a member based on the difference between white and black balls in the box. In some Lodges a single black ball would be enough to disqualify a hopeful candidate for membership, hence the term "He got Black-Balled".

Told you - history is cool!

#4 anglepose

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 01:45 PM

the word "salary" comes from salt wich was used to pay roman slaves as money it was on a programme i was watching today

#5 Qfwfq

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Posted 12 June 2006 - 03:58 AM

Uhm, I thought it was the soldiers!

#6 Darnok

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Posted 14 June 2006 - 03:31 AM

During the depression, banks first used sellotape to mend torn currency. haha

#7 Darnok

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Posted 14 June 2006 - 03:33 AM

and karate actually originated in India. haha

#8 Michaelangelica

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 06:15 AM

A silly site

http://www.brainyhistory.com/

m

#9 Freddy

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 08:36 PM

The phrase, "lock, stock, and barrel" comes from the parts of the British musket, the Brown Bess.

#10 "Kal"-ee-'for-nyah

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Posted 24 June 2006 - 11:51 PM

the doctors mob of 1788 was the first riot in american history.

#11 Buffy

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Posted 26 June 2006 - 01:55 AM

Up to the mid-20th century, it was illegal for a woman to wear pants in New York: the offense was "impersonating a man." :naughty:

Fond of kilts on guys,
Buffy

#12 "Kal"-ee-'for-nyah

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Posted 26 June 2006 - 10:46 AM

It snowed in the Sahara desert on February 18, 1979.

#13 Turtle

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 07:59 PM

Looking forward to next Halloween & a go at this!:)

Snap-dragon (also known as Flap-dragon, Snapdragon, or Flapdragon) was a parlour game popular from about the 16th to 19th centuries. It was played during the winter, particularly on Christmas Eve. Brandy was heated and placed in a wide shallow bowl; raisins were placed in the brandy which was then set alight. Typically, lights were extinguished or dimmed to increase the eerie effect of the blue flames playing across the liquor. The aim of the game was to pluck the raisins out of the burning brandy and eat them, at the risk of being burnt. Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language (1755) describes it as "a play in which they catch raisins out of burning brandy and, extinguishing them by closing the mouth, eat them". According to an eighteenth-century article in the Tatler magazine, "the wantonness of the thing was to see each other look like a demon, as we burnt ourselves, and snatched out the fruit." Snap-dragon was played in England and the United States (Blain (1912) suggests that in the United States it was played at Halloween instead), but there is insufficient evidence of the practice in Scotland, or other countries.

read more>
http://encyclopedia....com/flap-dragon

#14 Michaelangelica

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 06:02 AM

Looking forward to next Halloween & a go at this!:confused:

read more>
http://encyclopedia....com/flap-dragon

You would need to be an upper middle class family to afford the brandy & the fruit.
Where beards banned?

#15 eric l

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Posted 10 August 2006 - 10:19 AM

The phrase, "lock, stock, and barrel" comes from the parts of the British musket, the Brown Bess.

I thought the expression came from the Harper's Ferry Arsenal, in the days of the"war between the states". According to what I learned, this was the first instance where the locks, the stocks and the barrels came from different suppliers for each item. But I can not trace back my source.

#16 Freddy

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Posted 10 August 2006 - 03:38 PM

I thought the expression came from the Harper's Ferry Arsenal, in the days of the"war between the states". According to what I learned, this was the first instance where the locks, the stocks and the barrels came from different suppliers for each item. But I can not trace back my source.


Actually, interchangeable parts came before the Civil War. Eli Whitney of MA received a pattent. The folks down at the Bunker (Breed's) Hill Monument in Charlestown, MA claim it came from the British Brown Bess musket used in the American Revolution. Several sites claim this. The first wriiten use comes from Sir Walter Scott in 1817. It could have been around some time before he used it, or Scott could have originated it.

#17 Michaelangelica

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Posted 11 August 2006 - 05:10 AM

The Japanese were recieving shipment(s) of uranium via the Phillipines by German U-boat as early as 1942.They were paying in gold bulion stolen from Korea and China and from their extensive heroin trafficking operations

There own A bomb programme statrted in 1930s

Current nuclear activities in Japan
Wikepedia says
http://en.wikipedia...._atomic_program

Since the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan is a staunch opponent of nuclear arms on all government levels. However, Japan does make extensive use of nuclear energy in nuclear reactors, generating a significant percentage of the electricity in Japan.
Japan has the third largest nuclear energy production after the U.S. and France, and plans to produce over 40% of its electricity using nuclear power by 2010. Significant amounts of Plutonium are created as a by-product of the energy production, and Japan had 4.7 tons of plutonium in December 1995. Japan has also developed the M-5 three-stage solid fuel rocket, similar in design to the U.S. LG-118A Peacekeeper ICBM.
While there are currently no known plans in Japan to produce nuclear weapons, it has been argued Japan has the technology, raw materials, and the capital to produce nuclear weapons within one year if necessary, and some analysts consider it a "de facto" nuclear state for this reason.