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Swine flu: The new pandemic?


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#1 mynah

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 01:35 AM

In several years, the avian flu outbreak that has mainly been claiming victims in Asia has reached phase 3, which is the earliest phase of the pandemic warning period. In a few weeks the swine flu outbreak that started in Mexico has gone to phase 5, the last of the pandemic warning period. Just how serious is this disease going to be? (If it is any consolation, it does not appear to have as high a mortality rate as avian flu - although no-one seems to know just what the mortality rate is.)

#2 Racoon

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 02:30 AM

At least a thousand people die of Malaria per day! But is that considered a Pandemic??
Those are proven numbers..
36,000 die in America alone yearly from the regular garden variety flu..

I think this Swine Flu is to take our attention off the Politics and Banking Shenanigans that are going on

:cheer::phones::smart:

#3 Buffy

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 02:52 AM

Nah, it's just part of the economic stimulus package: the news on teevee is reporting now that it's easier to find gold than it is to find hand sanitizer here in the Bay Area....

Fact is that the answer really ends up being "better safe than sorry".

There is a strong suspicion that due to the poor public health infrastructure in Mexico, all that's been reported is the proverbial tip-of-the-iceberg and many more cases and unreported deaths are still off the radar.

What's more scary is the very rapid spread of *confirmed* cases in the US. It still could be very mild, but when you're talking about a virus that we have no immunity for, it can very easily become 1918 all over again.

Sobering thought: just like in 1918, this Swine Flu seems to mostly kill healthy folks in their 20s and 30s, bypassing the old and young that are in that 36,000 per year of flu deaths in the US....

Insisting on perfect safety is for people who don't have the balls to live in the real world, :phones:
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#4 Racoon

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 03:02 AM

I'll let it go that its still too early to tell.. :phones:

But with other everyday viruses in the world that kill thousands on a 24 hour basis, the swine flu is No big deal comparatively so far.

There are a few other roads I didn't go down yet. One being race specific eugenics (ie Latino death rate compared to American) , another being NWO trial runs for forced innoculations and quarantines..

#5 Racoon

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 03:05 AM

I'm sure that Buffy will be first in line to get her Baxter Labs swine flu shot :naughty:

#6 mynah

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 03:08 AM

Would be informative to know what really kills swine flu victims. With ordinary flu, it is usually people with weakened immune systems and underlying medical problems who die, or those who contract pneumonia. The deaths of healthy people, however, suggest cytokine storm - a pretty ghastly and dramatic way to go, and usually the result of a violent immune system reaction to something it experiences as totally alien.

Swine flu and cytokine storm


#7 mynah

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 03:26 AM

There are a few other roads I didn't go down yet. One being race specific eugenics (ie Latino death rate compared to American) , another being NWO trial runs for forced innoculations and quarantines..


I wouldn't regard either "Latino" or "American" as valid racial categories - but yes, there could very well be good reasons other than coincidence why more people have died in Mexico than the USA.

#8 Theory5

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 06:27 AM

but yes, there could very well be good reasons other than coincidence why more people have died in Mexico than the USA.


How about the fact that Mexican hospitals can't even deal with normal desease's and viruses while the swine flu here in America is just something for the news to hype about taking our minds off of the political stuff?
Heck the news claimed my school has a teacher that has swine flu. But in reality he just has a cold and his doctor told him to inform our school because of everything that is happening.
I see this as nothing but a tool for the media to cause panic with.

#9 Turtle

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 11:14 AM

In several years, the avian flu outbreak that has mainly been claiming victims in Asia has reached phase 3, which is the earliest phase of the pandemic warning period. In a few weeks the swine flu outbreak that started in Mexico has gone to phase 5, the last of the pandemic warning period. Just how serious is this disease going to be? (If it is any consolation, it does not appear to have as high a mortality rate as avian flu - although no-one seems to know just what the mortality rate is.)


No :esmoking:; there is a phase 6. The idea that this is some sort of scare-tactic or political maneuvering is ridiculus beyond the pale. (get it; pale? :() Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it. :read:

CDC - Influenza (Flu) | Pandemic Influenza: Phases

Stages of a Pandemic

The World Health Organization (WHO) has developed a global influenza preparedness plan, which defines the stages of a pandemic, outlines the role of WHO, and makes recommendations for national measures before and during a pandemic. The phases are:

Interpandemic period
Phase 1 : No new influenza virus subtypes have been detected in humans. An influenza virus subtype that has caused human infection may be present in animals. If present in animals, the risk of human infection or disease is considered to be low.

Phase 2: No new influenza virus subtypes have been detected in humans. However, a circulating animal influenza virus subtype poses a substantial risk of human disease.

Pandemic alert period
Phase 3: Human infection(s) with a new subtype but no human-to-human spread, or at most rare instances of spread to a close contact.

Phase 4: Small cluster(s) with limited human-to-human transmission but spread is highly localized, suggesting that the virus is not well adapted to humans.

Phase 5: Larger cluster(s) but human-to-human spread still localized, suggesting that the virus is becoming increasingly better adapted to humans but may not yet be fully transmissible (substantial pandemic risk).

Pandemic period
Phase 6: Pandemic: increased and sustained transmission in general population.



#10 Michaelangelica

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 01:55 PM

Fact Buster
Posted Image
Q: Will a face mask protect me from swine flu?
A: Yes, but use it correctly and take other hygiene measures

.

Our expert: Dr Raina MacIntyre
Published 29/04/2009
Have your say

Would you wear a face mask to ensure you don't catch the flu? Have your say on the messageboard below.
Conditions of Use

We've all seen the pictures of Mexican commuters wearing face masks to protect them from that country's outbreak of deadly swine flu. But is there any evidence the masks actually work?

Well it seems there is. Public health expert Professor Raina MacIntyre researched the protective value of surgical versus P2 masks in 143 NSW families who had a child attend a hospital emergency department because of influenza.

Those parents who wore a surgical or P2 mask while tending to their sick kids were four times less likely to get influenza or other respiratory viruses, the study found.

But there's the rub. Getting people to wear the masks was an uphill battle. Just under half of parents wore their masks on the first day and the rate declined with every day that passed.

Of course, with the world in a frenzy over swine flu, and an effective vaccine unlikely to be available for months, that attitude could be about to change. MacIntyre now expects to see more people using the masks on public transport and in other crowded places.
How masks work

They may not be a great fashion statement, but the principle behind face masks is simple.

Because the influenza virus is transmitted in droplets of water, rather than through the air, placing a protective barrier over your face can block its entry into your mouth or nose.

So when the passenger sitting next to you on the bus coughs and splutters all the way into town, those virus-bearing droplets will stay on the outside of the mask rather than entering your system.

To be effective, you need to change your mask every time you remove it, for example, to eat. MacIntyre suggests using disposable paper masks, which you can buy from pharmacies, as they are cheap and easy to use.

Try to touch your face mask as little as possible, remove it using the straps, and dispose of it properly after use. There's not much point collecting the virus on the outside of the mask if you then smear it all over your hands immediately before eating.

You should also make sure you keep used masks away from children.
Other protective measures

It is important to remember, however, that the flu virus can live on surfaces for a couple of hours. That means even if you're wearing a mask it is still possible to catch the flu from your fellow commuters if you haven't washed your hands before putting them near your face.

Apart from wearing a mask, the best way to protect yourself from influenza – and any other infectious disease – is to follow normal good hygiene practices.

"Hand washing is extremely important and very, very protective," says MacIntyre.

You should wash your hands with normal soap and water:

* after removing your mask
* before and after contact with other people
* before and after touching your mouth, nose or eyes
* before you eat.

Alcohol gel, rinses and foams do work, but they are no more effective than soap and water.

You'll also lessen your chances of catching the flu if you keep your hands away from your face.

If you are unlucky enough to pick up influenza, or other respiratory virus, then good sneezing etiquette will help protect those around you from sharing the pain. Don't cough or sneeze into your hand, use a tissue and dispose of it properly when you have finished.

It's also worth teaching children basic infection control principles, such as how to wash their hands properly and to cover their mouths when they cough or sneeze. You might also want to encourage them not to run their hands along surfaces when they are in public places.
Treatment

Go to your doctor if you have any symptoms of influenza such as fever, headache, muscle aches and pains, fatigue, runny nose, sore throat or cough. Prompt administration of antiviral drugs can dramatically reduce the severity of your symptoms.

It is also important to have your flu shots, MacIntyre says. Although the currently available vaccine probably won't provide any significant protection against swine flu, it will protect against other strains of influenza circulating in the community.

Professor Raina MacIntyre is an epidemiologist and the head of Public Health and Community Medicine at the University of NSW. She was interviewed by Jane McCredie.

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Matthew :

01 May 2009 12:37:03am


This answer really concerns me. I searched the WHO website for "Respirator protection".

The very first result is "Guide for field operations: Collecting, preserving and shipping specimens for the diagnosis of avian influenza A (H5N1) virus infection"

On the very first page of this document is states "Surgical and procedure masks do not provide protection against small-particle aerosols
(droplet nuclei)"

The second page states "Also it is almost impossible to prevent occasional leaks of contaminated air into the mask".

I don't feel the answer the ABC is giving is correct.


*
Rewhine :

30 Apr 2009 10:40:22pm

So let me see if I got this so far: If you know or suspect that you have the flu, then it's 'good' to wear a mask (assuming this is the stuff you can buy from the pharmacy), so you minimise spreading your germs around.

On the other hand, putting on a mask (of the unspecified kind)as a precautionary measure so you don't get someone else's bug is pretty much useless.

But if you wear an N95 mask then you're ok for either scenario?


*
Deb :

30 Apr 2009 5:23:31pm

If you're sick wear a mask so you don't infect others. Wearing a mask to stop you getting the virus just sounds overkill to me and as explaimed by Greg doesn't work with dust masks.


*
GREG :

30 Apr 2009 12:04:11pm

bollocks!
Unless the mask is a certified N95 respirator as per WHO's own guidelines then most of these other masks being sold or used are totally useless.
The type of surgical mask shown is only assisting in preventing the spread of the flu by containing the droplets within the mask of an infected person not preventing you getting the flu. A N95 is the only type of mask that would achieve this for the general public.
Some of the masks that are being worn on news reports etc even by reporters are also useless (just a nuisance dust mask) they are not even a surgical mask.
Please if you are going to put this information out in the public domain check your facts first or contact a specialist respiratory mask supplier.
No mention either in your article about the importance of a correctly fitted mask and the fact to achieve a protective seal you may have to look at masks of different sizes
.
regards
greg

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naughtee :

30 Apr 2009 4:53:09pm

no one mentioned putting the mask on your bollocks greg, although i'd imagine a correctly fitting bollock mask would be very important


.

Will a face mask protect me from swine flu? - Health & Wellbeing
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Will a face mask protect me from swine flu? - Health & Wellbeing

#11 Buffy

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 08:23 PM

I'm sure that Buffy will be first in line to get her Baxter Labs swine flu shot :)


Absolutely!

And I would encourage those who think its all a hoax to get one too in order to slow its spread of the virus....although if there are limited supplies, those folks definitely should pass up a shot....Darwin will take it from there! ;)

Quit worrying about your health. It'll go away, :)
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#12 Turtle

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 08:36 PM

Would be informative to know what really kills swine flu victims. With ordinary flu, it is usually people with weakened immune systems and underlying medical problems who die, or those who contract pneumonia. The deaths of healthy people, however, suggest cytokine storm - a pretty ghastly and dramatic way to go, and usually the result of a violent immune system reaction to something it experiences as totally alien.

Swine flu and cytokine storm


The authorities are making these assesments as we type. Keep in mind the majority of deaths were 20 - 40 years old, not the usual aged, young, and weakend immune system folks the 'regular' flu usually kills. This 20-40 age group mortality is just what we saw with the pandemic of 1918.

The reason this has killed more in Mexico may well just be because that's where it started.

Here's the CDC update page on H1N1, aka 'swine flu'. :) >> CDC H1N1 Flu
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#13 GAHD

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Posted 01 May 2009 - 12:47 AM

so it culls the strong and leaves the weakling...this should be renamed the 'anti Darwin flu'.

#14 HydrogenBond

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Posted 01 May 2009 - 08:07 AM

The swine flu is real, but the media hype appears to be tapping into the human fear of the unknown, to transfer a fear virus at epidemic proportions. If one puts the flu into perspective, like comparing the mortality to malaria, which takes more lives, there is an irrational tendency to make the lessor appear worse, due to collective unconscious processes that are triggered by the fear virus. Instead of a vaccine, maybe science needs to work on a chill pill, since the fear virus has infected tens of millions.

The next thing that comes to mind, is a strong fear virus provides an unconscious motivation to help move the herd. The situation is like there is one wolf among a herd of 10,000 sheep, with the entire herd starting to move because of the spreading fear. Once in motion, because of the fear virus, this is a good time to funnel the sheep down a chute so we can shear them for their wool.

#15 Turtle

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Posted 01 May 2009 - 01:12 PM

The swine flu is real, but the media hype appears to be tapping into the human fear of the unknown, to transfer a fear virus at epidemic proportions. ...


Unsubstantiated twaddle! :) Good grief! :)


CDC H1N1 Flu

...CDC continues to issue and update interim guidance daily in response to the rapidly evolving situation. Early this morning [May1, 2009], CDC provided interim guidance on school closures. Supplies from CDC’s Division of the Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) are being sent to all 50 states and U.S. territories to help them respond to the outbreak. In addition, the Federal Government and manufacturers have begun the process of developing a vaccine against this new virus.

Response actions are aggressive, but they may vary across states and communities depending on local circumstances. Communities, businesses, places of worship, schools and individuals can all take action to slow the spread of this outbreak. People who are sick are urged to stay home from work or school and to avoid contact with others, except to seek medical care. This action can avoid spreading illness further.

U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection
(As of May 1, 2009, 11:00 AM ET)
Arizona 4
California 13
Colorado 2
Delaware 4
Illinois 3
Indiana 3
Kansas 2
Kentucky 1
Massachusetts 2
Michigan 2
Minnesota 1
Nebraska 1
Nevada 1
New Jersey 5
New York 50
Ohio 1
South Carolina 16
Texas 28 1
Virginia 2
TOTAL COUNTS 141 cases 1 death



#16 Racoon

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Posted 02 May 2009 - 04:30 AM

Heres a 10 minute video worth watching, especially after the third minute... If you can get past Alex Jones interupting Dr. Deagle.

Dr. Deagle gives a good explanation about the virus, and whats happening. :naughty:

YouTube - Dr. Bill Deagle on Alex Jones Tv (HD) Report on Swine Flu Outbreak in Mexico City

Note: Apparently Alex Jones videos have been Ixnee on YouTube eey.. conspiracy or not. They've been taking them down.. Better that you Don't know whats going on apparently

#17 InfiniteNow

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Posted 02 May 2009 - 07:27 AM

If you can get past Alex Jones interupting Dr. Deagle.


Speaking of "fear viruses"... :jumpforjoy:

Why live a life grounded in reality when you can make up <quote> facts <unquote> as you please to suit your preconceived biases?