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Are The Elderly Adults?


hazelm
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If I and a friend each read this correctly - and I think we do - the elderly are not classed as adults.

 

https://neurosciencenews.com/loneliness-age-16792/

"......The sixth age shifts

Into the lean and slippered pantaloon,

With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;

His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide

For his shrunk shank, and his big manly voice,

Turning again toward childish treble, pipes

And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,

That ends this strange eventful history,

Is second childishness and mere oblivion,

Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything."

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"......The sixth age shifts

Into the lean and slippered pantaloon,

With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;

His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide

For his shrunk shank, and his big manly voice,

Turning again toward childish treble, pipes

And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,

That ends this strange eventful history,

Is second childishness and mere oblivion,

Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything."

Who created this?  I like it.  Thank you. 

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Who created this?  I like it.  Thank you. 

Shakespeare. It's called "The Seven Ages of Man" and is quite widely quoted. It comes from As You Like It. The full poem is as follows:

 

All the world's a stage,

And all the men and women merely players;

They have their exits and their entrances,

And one man in his time plays many parts,

His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,

Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.

Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel

And shining morning face, creeping like snail

Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,

Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad

Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,

Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,

Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,

Seeking the bubble reputation

Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice,

In fair round belly with good capon lined,

With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,

Full of wise saws and modern instances;

And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts

Into the lean and slippered pantaloon,

With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;

His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide

For his shrunk shank, and his big manly voice,

Turning again toward childish treble, pipes

And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,

That ends this strange eventful history,

Is second childishness and mere oblivion,

Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

 

I and others often reference these stages as our lives unfold. Having retired a few years ago, I have now moved from the era of the Justice to that of the lean and slippered pantaloon. Second childhood is to come - if I am spared. My father is there now. 

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Shakespeare. It's called "The Seven Ages of Man" and is quite widely quoted. It comes from As You Like It. The full poem is as follows:

 

All the world's a stage,

And all the men and women merely players;

They have their exits and their entrances,

And one man in his time plays many parts,

His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,

Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.

Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel

And shining morning face, creeping like snail

Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,

Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad

Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,

Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,

Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,

Seeking the bubble reputation

Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice,

In fair round belly with good capon lined,

With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,

Full of wise saws and modern instances;

And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts

Into the lean and slippered pantaloon,

With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;

His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide

For his shrunk shank, and his big manly voice,

Turning again toward childish treble, pipes

And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,

That ends this strange eventful history,

Is second childishness and mere oblivion,

Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

 

I and others often reference these stages as our lives unfold. Having retired a few years ago, I have now moved from the era of the Justice to that of the lean and slippered pantaloon. Second childhood is to come - if I am spared. My father is there now. 

That is the first time I have read that in full, I think.  The first two lines might have clued me in.  We should send it to AARP who think old age begins in the 60s. Good grief!  In my sixties  I was still a young whippersnapper. 

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how old are you?

something seems like interesting to me , because I was supposing you were...between 25-35 :)

Heaven forbid.  That's  a rough road to travel.  Let's just say I'm old enough to have learned a few things but still learning more just for fun.

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Heaven forbid.  That's  a rough road to travel.  Let's just say I'm old enough to have learned a few things but still learning more just for fun.

ok. 

I just explained my opinion regarding one context mentioned in the details. 

but..I nevertheless do not interact with people so much closely in general meaning. 

 

....

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