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Windows To The Deep 2019


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If anyone is interested, the Okeanos Explorer has just got underway again, making its way out of Port Canaveral and heading for the first dive site off the East Coast of Florida. I won’t be saying any more here as there is a lot of information available at the official NOAA OER website, much better than anything I can post even if I had the time to do it, which I don’t.

 

Here is a live camera view looking over the stern. When the ROVs are inuse, making the dives starting tomorrow morning there will be additional cameras, including underwater feeds that you can follow.

Enjoy the ride!

 

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Just a quick update on what the exploration vessel Okeanos Explorer has been doing and what lies ahead.   The current exploration expedition goes by the name: Deep Connections 2019: Exploring Atlantic

If anyone is interested, the Okeanos Explorer has just got underway again, making its way out of Port Canaveral and heading for the first dive site off the East Coast of Florida. I won’t be saying any

Footage from dive #7 - "Oh My Grouper" on June 28, 2019 was just on WYFF news, one of our local networks up here in Greenville, SC.  While it was nice to see that they finally noticed something outsid

Sorry I could not reply to you sooner; Internet access is limited.

Okeanos Explorer is currently preparing for an ROV dive at coordinates 30.53913N, 78.21681W

This expedition will not be going near your mark at 27.7806N, 77.5089W

But mapping will pass almost directly over your mark of 31.01984N, 79.69799W

In fact there will be an ROV dive very near to that location.

That dive could happen tomorrow, depending on a few factors, and on what the scientists prefer.

You may want to check the link I gave, tomorrow and/or the following day, if you are interested in that particular location. Dives are scheduled for around 8:30 ET.

Did you drop your watch overboard there? Are you offering a reward for recovery? :winknudge:

 

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Sorry I could not reply to you sooner; Internet access is limited.

Okeanos Explorer is currently preparing for an ROV dive at coordinates 30.53913N, 78.21681W

This expedition will not be going near your mark at 27.7806N, 77.5089W

But mapping will pass almost directly over your mark of 31.01984N, 79.69799W

In fact there will be an ROV dive very near to that location.

That dive could happen tomorrow, depending on a few factors, and on what the scientists prefer.

You may want to check the link I gave, tomorrow and/or the following day, if you are interested in that particular location. Dives are scheduled for around 8:30 ET.

Did you drop your watch overboard there? Are you offering a reward for recovery? :winknudge:

I'd be interested to learn the health of the corals. I was appalled a couple of years ago to visit coral in the Mediterranean, off the coast of Corsica, which was completely dead. I don't know whether it was pollution or climate change, but very depressing.

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Sorry I could not reply to you sooner; Internet access is limited.

Okeanos Explorer is currently preparing for an ROV dive at coordinates 30.53913N, 78.21681W

This expedition will not be going near your mark at 27.7806N, 77.5089W

But mapping will pass almost directly over your mark of 31.01984N, 79.69799W

In fact there will be an ROV dive very near to that location.

That dive could happen tomorrow, depending on a few factors, and on what the scientists prefer.

You may want to check the link I gave, tomorrow and/or the following day, if you are interested in that particular location. Dives are scheduled for around 8:30 ET.

Did you drop your watch overboard there? Are you offering a reward for recovery? :winknudge:

Just points of interest. I'm mildly surprised one dive is so close, but then again I can't be the only one to look at the topology maps and be curious about the high signature there.

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Just a quick update: Okeanos Explorer is now heading for a new ROV dive location that is not far off from the location you were interested in, GAHD, reasonably near to  31N, 79.6 and it is a “possible” shipwreck dive so I hope people will be interested in watching the live stream starting about 9 AM ET (13:00 UTC), less than 4 hours from now.

 

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I was watching the footage of ROV collecting a rock sample.  I was not aware that Manganese Nodules were found in that part of the ocean.

 

"Their composition varies by location, and sizeable deposits have been found in four areas:

The largest of these deposits in terms of nodule abundance and metal concentration occur in the Clarion Clipperton Zone on vast abyssal plains in the deep ocean between 4,000 and 6,000 m (13,000 and 20,000 ft). The International Seabed Authority estimates that the total amount of nodules in the Clarion Clipperton Zone exceeds 21 billions of tons (Bt), containing about 5.95 Bt of manganese, 0.27 Bt of nickel, 0.23 Bt of copper and 0.05 Bt of cobalt.[2]"

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manganese_nodule

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I'd be interested to learn the health of the corals. I was appalled a couple of years ago to visit coral in the Mediterranean, off the coast of Corsica, which was completely dead. I don't know whether it was pollution or climate change, but very depressing.

 

I too noticed quite a bit of coral bleaching in the Caribbean a few years ago which I assumed then was acidification from carbon dioxide emisions.  As I understand it the coral ejects the algae symbiote when conditions are less favorable, like higher water temperatures.

 

EL18p-R%C3%A9union.jpg

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coral_bleaching

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I was watching the footage of ROV collecting a rock sample.  I was not aware that Manganese Nodules were found in that part of the ocean.

 

 

 

I thought manganese nodules were found in all of the oceans, but of course in some places they are more abundant. They are not particularly abundant on the Blake plateau, which is where this expedition is being conducted and is almost all carbonate rock. I ain't no physcikisk, but I knows what matters.

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I too noticed quite a bit of coral bleaching in the Caribbean a few years ago which I assumed then was acidification from carbon dioxide emisions.  As I understand it the coral ejects the algae symbiote when conditions are less favorable, like higher water temperatures.

 

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coral_bleaching

 

While a lot of coral rubble has been seen on this expedition, scientists were delighted to see many “happy and healthy” coral colonies of mainly bamboo coral.

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While nobody is predicting a shipwreck dive, I suspect today’s dive, about 60 miles off the Maryland/Delaware coast might be interesting. It is close to some very busy shipping lanes and there there are some known wrecks in the vicinity. Even without a shipwreck, this dive should prove interesting for marine biologist and geologists. Only two more days!

 

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Footage from dive #7 - "Oh My Grouper" on June 28, 2019 was just on WYFF news, one of our local networks up here in Greenville, SC.  While it was nice to see that they finally noticed something outside of Clemson Football, it is disappointing that it took them 12 days to broadcast.

 

https://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1903/dailyupdates/june28/media/sharks-log.html

 

P.S. I thought it was great that the grouper took advantage of the cover provided by your camera sled to grab a quick snack.  I wonder where he normally hangs out?

Edited by fahrquad
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Footage from dive #7 - "Oh My Grouper" on June 28, 2019 was just on WYFF news, one of our local networks up here in Greenville, SC.  While it was nice to see that they finally noticed something outside of Clemson Football, it is disappointing that it took them 12 days to broadcast.

 

https://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1903/dailyupdates/june28/media/sharks-log.html

 

 

 

I think it’s great that they aired that video clip, and thanks for the information.

 

 

 

P.S. I thought it was great that the grouper took advantage of the cover provided by your camera sled to grab a quick snack.  I wonder where he normally hangs out?

 

 

Anywhere he wants to! :yes:

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