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I just seen a star disappear?


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hi geko, I've been an amateur astronomer for 50 years now, and I've seen a couple of events like you described. Once my brothers and I were "camping out" in the back yard, lying on our backs, looking

Welcome to hypography, DonSimone! :) Please feel free to start a topic in the introductions forum to tell us something about yourself.   This is a common, and very bad, misunderstanding of nonlocal

Hey Start! You say you saw this MONDAY at 255 Slovenian time. Well I happened to have seen the EXACT same thing. It was a little after 11 pm central time. (Chicago). I'm still struggling to rati

I was just oustide looking up at the sky and seen what i thought at the time was a disappearing star. It was a relatively bright one and as i was looking at it, it got dimmer and dimmer until it was gone. Took like 5 seconds or so to completely disappear from what i could see.

 

Star disappearring seems a little far-fetched i thought, so was thinking of ways that it could or couldnt have been but have no idea where im coming from really. How likely is it? Once in a lifetime i would imagine but dont know.

 

It wasnt the space station as that was in the sky at the same time. The star was kind of in the path of the satellite so i thought that maybe it was reflecting light off of something, and as the angles changed the light changed path and that's what i seen? No idea.

 

No clouds in the sky.

 

What do you make of it?

 

Maybe you saw a reference star; those glowing sodium atoms [about 100 km up?] that observatories create with a laser, to use as a reference point for adaptive optics programs. But I don't know what the decay rate is for those, once they turn off the laser.

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this is even weirder,i was looking out the bedroom window one stary night and felt compelled to star at three stars together,forming a triangle,the sky was full of stars nothing stood out about theses three.just 3 stars not moving,sudenly all 3 started to move in the same direction at different speeds,then thay slowly faded out one at a time,was that clouds in the way or an optical illusion,or satalites getting in the way,ill never forget it,weird.:)

 

 

I see this one all the time

glad someone else has seen it also

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  • 1 year later...

Hi, new here, did a search on google and found this thread.

 

Just wanted to say I have just witnessed the same thing:

 

Saw a stationary "star-like" object dim out in 1-2 seconds never to return during a smoke break this morning.

 

I live out in Barstow, CA. Completely clear skies about 2 hours before sunrise.

 

I noticed it due to an airplane nearby that caught my eyes attention as I was just gazing around, once I was focused on the plane, to the left of it about 20 degrees I caught the dimming out and focused on that for its last moments of light.

 

I dont know anything about brightness levels, but if I had to describe how bright it was at its brightest (before going poof be gone) I would say it was just a little brighter than the average star that you can see with the naked eye. If north is 0, the position was about 160 degrees (in between south and southeast) and if the earth was flat, it would have made about a 45 degree angle with the ground.

 

If it was indeed something falling into the earths atmosphere coming 100% strait into my direction, that would be a first for me, it would also be a first on any other explanation.

 

Ive seen my fair share of "shooting stars" and what not, satellites catching the suns reflection, etc etc, but never something that did not move from my point of view.

 

Anyways, enjoyed the read on the many possibilities of what such a phenomena could be.

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Laymen reports on phenomena have poor credibility, im waiting for an astronomical observatory to report a "missing star". I suppose their star maps are fairly accurate. So a vanishing star would be noticed,even if the actual disapperence wasnt.

That is, IF we are looking ...Are we?

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  • 2 years later...

I was just oustide looking up at the sky and seen what i thought at the time was a disappearing star. It was a relatively bright one and as i was looking at it, it got dimmer and dimmer until it was gone. Took like 5 seconds or so to completely disappear from what i could see.

 

Star disappearring seems a little far-fetched i thought, so was thinking of ways that it could or couldnt have been but have no idea where im coming from really. How likely is it? Once in a lifetime i would imagine but dont know.

 

It wasnt the space station as that was in the sky at the same time. The star was kind of in the path of the satellite so i thought that maybe it was reflecting light off of something, and as the angles changed the light changed path and that's what i seen? No idea.

 

No clouds in the sky.

 

What do you make of it?

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Morning of 11/26/2014, I saw this EXACT same phenomenon near either Merak or Dubhe. I let my dogs out, looked up thinking 'why is there an extra star in the Big Dipper?'. There is no prominent star there. It then disappeared over 3-5 seconds. I suspect a geosynchronous satellite that changed direction just enough to occlude reflection (or as others have mentioned it is more likely occlusion by a planet or even the horizon, although probably not Jupiter in this case since Jupiter was also visible in Leo where it would not have occluded a satellite in this area).

 

But it was a very interesting sight, very UFO-ish looking. I haven't verified against any satellite trackers but I'm pretty sure that's what it was.

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  • 4 weeks later...

This same thing has happened to me last night. As I was focussing on the brightest star in the sky, the star started to dim and after 5 or 10 seconds disappeared. When I looked away, it reappeared. I repeated this a few times with several different stars, and the same thing happened over and over again, even without clouds or any other inteference I could think of, besides of my own... Guys, has it ever occurred to you that this may not be the light of the stars changing but you making a change to the light of the stars? I know this may sound strange, but please bear with me, this statement is actually based on some solid scientific evidence.

 

Let me start by pointing out a strange property in the subatomic world called ‘nonlocality’. This refers to the ability of a quantum entity such as an individual electron to influence another quantum particle instantaneously over any distance despite there being no exchange of force or energy. This means that quantum particles once in contact retain a connection even when separated, so that the actions of one will always influence the other, no matter how far they get separated. So whenever two particles are connected, the action on one will always influence the other, no matter the distance. In a famous experiment, an Irish phycisist named John Bell took 2 quantum particles that were connected, separated them and started doing tests on them. Every time he would influence one particle, for instance by heating or freezing it, the other particle would react in the same way, as if it were being heated or frozen itself. This effect happened instantaneously and with no regard to the space between them. So if each particle was in a different part of the world, they still would behave in the same way, with a transfer of information faster than the speed of light. Einstein called this 'spooky action at a distance', but failed to recognize himself that this basic feature of quantum particles defied one of his own basic premises of the physical world: that nothing in the universe travels faster than the speed of light. Several experiments since then have demonstrated decisively that the speed of light is not an absolute outer boundary in the subatomic world. Einstein was right about a lot of things, but not this...

 

So some invisible wire connects all quantum particles in a huge energetic field that is in constant interaction and can directly influence each other over any distance. We also know that our thoughts, our actions and basically every little thing we do has a physical effect on the world around us in the form of wave patterns that interact with each other on the quantum level. That is a given, backed up by the most distinguished physicists of our time. Now, let's take this to its logical conclusion. If we are all part of the same strange universe and interact with the same strange particles that all behave in the same strange way, wouldn't that mean that it is possible for us to make an instantaneous connection with anything anywhere, even a faraway star or galaxy? Just think about it. We all have the power to influence particles just by focusing our attention to it, no matter the distance. All we need is that there is some sort of connection between particles for them to be able to interact with each other. But the fact that we are looking to a star or galaxy from far away, might mean that we are able to connect with all the particles at once. Or perhaps every single particle in our universe is already connected as they all belonged to one single entity before they all got spread across the universe by a Big Bang. Therefore it should be theoretically possible for us to influence the emission of particles, such as light, from other parts of the universe, including the ones that have already been sent out.

 

This is just a thought. It may all sound crazy, but so do the findings of today's quantum physicists. Now, before you all start gazing at stars and try to make them disappear, I don't think any person is capable of doing that at just any time. When I did it, I was feeling in a state of trance because I was just figuring all this stuff out while standing on a secluded tropical beach in northern Colombia after a few glasses of wine and a few puffs of weed. Circumstances were perfect for me to connect with this higher force field and I felt the connection very strongly. This might not always be the case. Nevertheless, I invite all of you to do the same and try to interact with the skies above. I hope you can confirm what I believe happened to me!

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This same thing has happened to me last night. As I was focussing on the brightest star in the sky, the star started to dim and after 5 or 10 seconds disappeared. When I looked away, it reappeared. I repeated this a few times with several different stars, and the same thing happened over and over again, even without clouds or any other inteference I could think of, besides of my own... Guys, has it ever occurred to you that this may not be the light of the stars changing but you making a change to the light of the stars?

Or *maybe*, just *maybe* it's that our brains aren't perfect consumers of our eyes' information, and so when we stare at a single, dim point of light for a while our brain starts to "ignore" it. This in combination with the relative lack of rods in the center of the eye means that looking directly at a dim star will make it appear to disappear, while looking away from it will bring it back into "existence".

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Welcome to hypography, DonSimone! :) Please feel free to start a topic in the introductions forum to tell us something about yourself.

 

Let me start by pointing out a strange property in the subatomic world called ‘nonlocality’. This refers to the ability of a quantum entity such as an individual electron to influence another quantum particle instantaneously over any distance despite there being no exchange of force or energy. This means that quantum particles once in contact retain a connection even when separated, so that the actions of one will always influence the other, no matter how far they get separated. So whenever two particles are connected, the action on one will always influence the other, no matter the distance.

This is a common, and very bad, misunderstanding of nonlocality, a consequence of quantum entanglement.

 

Entanglement between to particles occurs only in special circumstances. The two particles must share a single quantum wave function, and that wave function must be in a state of coherence regarding some quantum physical property, such as momentum, spin, or polarization. Then a measurement is made of this property for one particle, determining its value, the value of the other particle becomes know (that is, when that particle is measured, its value can be predicted with 100% certainty)

regardless of how separated they are.

 

However, because these properties can only be measured, not forced to have a specific value, quantum entanglement can’t be used to communicate instantly.

 

For an encyclopedic summary, and some references, to this consequence, see this Wikipedia section.

 

In a famous experiment, an Irish phycisist named John Bell took 2 quantum particles that were connected, separated them and started doing tests on them. Every time he would influence one particle, for instance by heating or freezing it, the other particle would react in the same way, as if it were being heated or frozen itself.

This claim has a couple of inaccuracies.

 

A minor historical one is that John Bell didn’t actually conduct experients. He was a theorist, not an experimentalist. In 1964, he published a paper resolving a concern about quantum mechanics published by Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky, and Nathan Rosen. These concerns are now known as the EPR paradox, Bell’s resolution as Bell's theorem (also Bell’s inequality, and Bell’s test). Bell’s theorem provided a method to experimentally test if quantum mechanics, with its prediction of entanglement and nonlocality, is correct, or if a “locally realistic” alternative is. Many experimentalists conducted experiments to test Bell’s theorem – this Wikipedia page lists notable ones.

 

An important conceptual inaccuracy is that quantum mechanics doesn’t predict that entangled particles have the same properties, but that their properties are complementary. For example, if two particles are produced by a single particle, the sum of their momenta equal the momentum of the original particles. Measuring the momentum of one particle measures the momentum of the other, not as the same, but as equal and opposite relative to the original particle. So rather than saying an entangled particle “reacts in the same way” as its partner, it’s more accurate to say it reacts in a “complementary”, or “opposite” way – being careful to understand that you’re using the word “react” not in the normal cause-and-effect sense, but is the peculiar quantum mechanical sense of “to be measured”.

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  • 8 months later...

I had the same experience as Shun.  There were the general stars in the sky when all of the sudden a bright "star" appeared and then disappeared.  I have no idea what it was.  I watched the  same area for another 5 minutes and nothing reappeared.  I don't believe there were any satellites in the area.  If you have an idea or website to check please let me know.  So glad I found this site.  Thanks so much.

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  • 10 months later...

just saw a star increase brightness and then vanishing... monday, 11th july 2016, 2.55 +- 5 mintes in the morning from ljubljana city, direction was northertly below W constelation (the stars that form W, which is helpfull with finding northern star)  and right.. about 20 degrees down and right.. ..  It wasn't a satelite/shooting star because it did not move at all... it just increased brightness for about 5s and then vanished... no clouds in the sky...

 

anybody maybe seen it also?

 

regards

Edited by start
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Hey Start! You say you saw this MONDAY at 255 Slovenian time. Well I happened to have seen the EXACT same thing. It was a little after 11 pm central time. (Chicago). I'm still struggling to rationalize this. I'm an avid star gazer and I've NEVER seen anything like this before. I saw it near the W constellation as well! Would have been a little after 6am your time.

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