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The 60's Movement


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#1 ThisIsMyName

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 10:56 AM

The Beatles... Hippies... Woodstock...

The 60's was a very interesting time with a ton of changes. How do you think all the different things that happened within that single decade effected how we see the world today??

Can you see the evidence still?

Where?

Are people just decorading this decade to amke it look like it was the turn of the century?

This should prove to be interesting :shrug:

#2 Drip Curl Magic

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 12:58 PM

haha. The drug culture explosion. There is a very good documentary on this time period, and many other time periods. The documentary is called "the drug years" It aired on VH1. Keep an eye out. It's actually really interesting.


I certainly do think that the 60's changed California in a lot of ways. The changes are still VERY evident in certain areas of San Francisco.

But I don't think there was that dramatic of a change anywhere else in the world.

there was a time when there was such a significant chunk of caifornians dropping LSD and smoking weed, that even commercial advertisements for our area changed to appeal to these people. "psychedelic advertisments"

I wasn't alive at the time, but I know they exist because I've seen a few examples of these "psychedelic advertisments" on that documentary "the drug years".


all in all, there WAS a change... but it probably wasn't as big- or as ideal as the hippies would have liked it to be.

For a while, it looked like it was going to spread.... it looked like there was going to be a nationwide revolution.

And right as the revolution was building up enough steam to do so- We atarted to see the downside of a drug-induced-love culture.

The Altamont concert, the manson murders, and the death of Jim Morrison, Janis Joplin, and Jimi Hendrix.

after the string of those 5 events, the entire hippie scene had lost it's leadership, and it's hope for peace.

If you ever get the chance to make it to SF, you can check out the haight-ashbury district. You can still find many neo-hippie types waddling around, making music and art in the streets. But most of them look a lot more burned out than they did in the 60's.

#3 ThisIsMyName

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 02:03 PM

I agree with you for the most part, but I do think that more parts of the world other than California were changed. After all, New York was the "host" of Woodstock


Revolution - The Beatles
You say you want a revolution
Well, you know
We all want to change the world
You tell me that it's evolution
Well, you know
We all want to change the world
But when you talk about destruction
Don't you know that you can count me out
Don't you know it's gonna be all right
all right, all right

You say you got a real solution
Well, you know
We'd all love to see the plan
You ask me for a contribution
Well, you know
We're doing what we can
But when you want money
for people with minds that hate
All I can tell is brother you have to wait
Don't you know it's gonna be all right
all right, all right
Ah

ah, ah, ah, ah, ah...

You say you'll change the constitution
Well, you know
We all want to change your head
You tell me it's the institution
Well, you know
You better free you mind instead
But if you go carrying pictures of chairman Mao
You ain't going to make it with anyone anyhow
Don't you know it's gonna be all right
all right, all right
all right, all right, all right
all right, all right, all right


This song had to do with a ton of political issues going on. What political things do you think affected our nationat the time? I'm sure the whole Flower Power thing put somewhat of a strain of school systems and the government to stop it. Your guess is as good as mine... I wasn't even around during the 80's :lol:

#4 Freddy

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 05:56 PM

The sixties brought many changes for good or bad.

Music with a message.
Free love/birth control/abortion, "Make love, not war".
Political change through protests.
"Hell no we won't go!"
A lost trust in government/military.
Questioning of religion/tradition/authority/parents.
Transformed the underground drug culture to the pop culture.
"Tune in, turn on, drop out"

#5 ThisIsMyName

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 09:40 PM

"Tune in, turn on, drop out"

I don't believe I've ever heard that before. Would you mind explaining it a little to me?

#6 InfiniteNow

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 09:29 AM

I don't believe I've ever heard that before. Would you mind explaining it a little to me?

It's a common statement made by what I'll call "mind explorers," generally referring to the steps taken to begin a psychedelic experience.

#7 alexander

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 10:11 AM

Tune in, turn on, drop out hmm... either psychadelic or sexual :shrug:

#8 ThisIsMyName

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 11:07 AM

Oh I see.... Kinda like, tune into the world and what going on and drop out of school, work, and responsibilites? Act on it? I'll have to research that a bit...
:shrug: Thanks!

#9 InfiniteNow

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 12:17 PM

Here ya go:

http://en.wikipedia....ne_in,_drop_out

:shrug:

[Timothy] Leary later explained in his 1983 autobiography Flashbacks: "'Turn on' meant go within to activate your neural and genetic equipment. Become sensitive to the many and various levels of consciousness and the specific triggers that engage them. Drugs were one way to accomplish this end. 'Tune in' meant interact harmoniously with the world around you - externalize, materialize, express your new internal perspectives. 'Drop out' suggested an elective, selective, graceful process of detachment from involuntary or unconscious commitments. Drop Out meant self-reliance, a discovery of one's singularity, a commitment to mobility, choice, and change. Unhappily my explanations of this sequence of personal development were often misinterpreted to mean 'Get stoned and abandon all constructive activity.'"



#10 ThisIsMyName

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 12:24 PM

Ahh, Wikipedia... If you could only download music from it, then it'd be better than Google.... :shrug:

Thanks!

#11 alexander

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 01:06 PM

it would not be better then google, google just has so much stuff in it, features and information-wise... now google if google combined with wikipedia, the results may be godly... answer to any question....

#12 ThisIsMyName

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 01:52 PM

True true!!
My God... :shrug:
We should write a letter to the President or something...
They can call it... "WikiGoogle" :)

#13 Freddy

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 04:21 PM

Here ya go:

http://en.wikipedia....ne_in,_drop_out

:hihi:


Yes, what Dr. Tim meant and how the hippies/students interpreted it then were sometimes two different things. My take at the time was, "wake up to the times, expand your mind, and do not follow the government blindly."

#14 Spiked Blood

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 04:44 PM

The 60s were overrated, I should know, I was there. Ok I wasn't, I'm not that old, but we've all saw the pictures, we know how bad the haircuts got!!:hihi:

and the death of Jim Morrison,


When Jim Morrison died, do you think it was 'the end', or did he 'break on through' to the other side?

I reckon in the sixties freedom probably quickly became synonymous with indulgence, and peace confused with 'hit someone else just not me'.

The music was awesome though!

#15 ThisIsMyName

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 05:19 PM

The music was awesome though!


Amen :hihi:

#16 Freddy

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 07:00 PM

The 60s were overrated, I should know, I was there. Ok I wasn't, I'm not that old, but we've all saw the pictures, we know how bad the haircuts got!!:hihi:



When Jim Morrison died, do you think it was 'the end', or did he 'break on through' to the other side?

I reckon in the sixties freedom probably quickly became synonymous with indulgence, and peace confused with 'hit someone else just not me'.

The music was awesome though!


After Vietnam (1973) and Watergate (1974) many of the hippies sold out, even Yippie Jerry Rubin, to corporate America. I think that is one of the reasons why Abbie Hoffman committed suicide. I attended his funeral service in Worcester (1989) which marked the end of the Movement.

#17 HydrogenBond

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 02:55 PM

The love children of the 1960's, were the children of WWII and Korean War parents. These children grow up in a time of strong family values and national pride. But it was also a time of the cold war which kept the idea of world annihilation over everyone's head. The combination of love, secuity and fear led to a need to change the world in a way to promote world peace, i.e, remove the fear.

President Kennedy was one of the youngest presidents ever. His election in 1960 shifted the perspective of the future away from the values of the older war generation to that of the idealist younger generation. Had he not been assasinated a more balanced changing of the guard may have occurred. Kennedy years were portrayed as Camelot or a blend of positive social change, material prosperity and strong family values. But upon his death, a vaccum was created in the younger generation, as politics shifted back to the old school. This incubated a generation gap.

The Beatles played a pivotal role. They filled in some of hero void in the youth created by Kennedy's death. Their music was hated by the older generation who saw it as immoral. This separation of music tastes helped solidify the generation gap. The youth than began to go in the opposite direction of their parents. They still had the love in their hearts that their mother instilled but they saw the need for radical social change to make a world of love and peace.

During the 1960's into the early 1970's the youth were integrated. It was called the love generation not just because of free sex, but also because anyone from the young generation was accepted by everyone else of that generation. It was like one big family that lived underground. Because the youth were so organized and peacefully concerned with progressive social change, they had an impact on their parents, who in turn began to listen and then politically helped the needs of the younger generations vision.

But at the same time, the youth were experimenting with alternate reality through eastern philosophy, a wide spectrum of drugs, alternate lifestyles, etc. This sort of messed up their heads during a time when their hearts were in the right place, i.e, love. The result was social change with much of it being very irrational and not thought out with respect to long term consequences.

By the late 1970's and early 1980's, this same generation, who fought against materialism for spiritualism became the more superfisical than their parents had ever been. They had successfully thrown out the baby (good moral values) with the bathwater (discrimination) with respect to what their parents stood for. This led to both progressive social change and social degeneration. The Hippies went from pot and rock to become Yuppies with disco cocaine parties. Free-love changed to degenerate, STDS, and AIDS, etc..

The Hippi-crates now run the country and preach constraint which they themselves never did when they were young. While this generation of youth are not organized enough to stand up to the hippi-crate generation and make a better world.