Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

8 Infinity Facts


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 hazelm

hazelm

    Creating

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1062 posts

Posted 08 September 2019 - 08:44 AM

I do not know if any of this interests anyone.  However,  I can't let go of the last one:  "Dividing by 0".  The claim is that you can not divide by 0, that it is an error code.  Something is hanging fire there.  Divide - say 8 - by 0.  Answer:  0 with remainder of 8.  No?

 

https://www.thoughtc...82310&utm_term=



#2 hazelm

hazelm

    Creating

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1062 posts

Posted 08 September 2019 - 09:10 AM

I do not know if any of this interests anyone.  However,  I can't let go of the last one:  "Dividing by 0".  The claim is that you can not divide by 0, that it is an error code.  Something is hanging fire there.  Divide - say 8 - by 0.  Answer:  0 with remainder of 8.  No?

 

https://www.thoughtc...82310&utm_term=

Ah!  Never mind.  You cannot divide by 0 when 0 stands for nothing because, once you divide by 0, you have divided by something.  Right? Infinity! 



#3 ralfcis

ralfcis

    Explaining

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 945 posts

Posted 08 September 2019 - 09:54 AM

Although math considers 0 a legit number sometimes it isn't when it associates with infinity. Any answer that is infinity is a wrong answer. I saw an interesting proof recently (from 1790) that .99999 infinite nines is = 1.  At what point do you have enough nines to say it equals 1. The answer is never. How could 2 different numbers be equal? Because if infinity can be  removed from the equation, the equation will have a finite answer.


Edited by ralfcis, 08 September 2019 - 09:56 AM.


#4 hazelm

hazelm

    Creating

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1062 posts

Posted 08 September 2019 - 10:40 AM

Although math considers 0 a legit number sometimes it isn't when it associates with infinity. Any answer that is infinity is a wrong answer. I saw an interesting proof recently (from 1790) that .99999 infinite nines is = 1.  At what point do you have enough nines to say it equals 1. The answer is never. How could 2 different numbers be equal? Because if infinity can be  removed from the equation, the equation will have a finite answer.

Now I'll ponder that  But, first, a cousin is awaiting a paper from me.  Until later......  Thanks.


Edited by hazelm, 08 September 2019 - 10:41 AM.


#5 ralfcis

ralfcis

    Explaining

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 945 posts

Posted 08 September 2019 - 11:08 AM

I read the article and it's the usual science journalism trivia. Infinity is an attic stuffed with dust. Is the dust important? No only in that you must get rid of it. Infinity is mostly filler.  Infinity is what gets in the way of finding meaningful answers. When people start pondering infinity as being worth pondering, they are lost in the trees and can't see the forest. Those people spend their lives calculating pi. That's what the article should have been about.


Edited by ralfcis, 08 September 2019 - 11:12 AM.


#6 hazelm

hazelm

    Creating

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1062 posts

Posted 08 September 2019 - 12:20 PM

I read the article and it's the usual science journalism trivia. Infinity is an attic stuffed with dust. Is the dust important? No only in that you must get rid of it. Infinity is mostly filler.  Infinity is what gets in the way of finding meaningful answers. When people start pondering infinity as being worth pondering, they are lost in the trees and can't see the forest. Those people spend their lives calculating pi. That's what the article should have been about.

That's what Science Daily is - journalism (mostly) trivia.  Once in a while you get a good one.  But mostly, we get stories of tests that are being done.  Someone else wants to confirm with tests of their own and off they go.  Isn't that how science works.  You come up with a good idea.  You want or need someone else to confirm your results?  Welcome to the team.  :-)



#7 LaurieAG

LaurieAG

    Explaining

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1509 posts

Posted 08 September 2019 - 11:06 PM

You can try to divide by zero in Windows 98a upwards and you will receive the message "you cannot divide by zero". On earlier versions of Windows you received a negative infinity message.



#8 exchemist

exchemist

    Creating

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2762 posts

Posted 09 September 2019 - 01:07 AM

In arithmetic, division by zero is strictly speaking said to be "undefined".  In ordinary use, one thinks of division by zero as something that would lead to a infinite result, i.e. n/0 = ∞. 



#9 GAHD

GAHD

    Eldritch Horror

  • Administrators
  • 2669 posts

Posted 09 September 2019 - 03:50 AM

The documentary "Dangerous Knowledge" About Cantor and others does a good job running though infinities. Yes, plural infinity, as there are many of them and you can divide and multiply and add and subtract in them. No wonder the concept made people go mad thinking about it, and made the mad flip back over to sane.

 



#10 hazelm

hazelm

    Creating

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1062 posts

Posted 09 September 2019 - 05:37 AM

The documentary "Dangerous Knowledge" About Cantor and others does a good job running though infinities. Yes, plural infinity, as there are many of them and you can divide and multiply and add and subtract in them. No wonder the concept made people go mad thinking about it, and made the mad flip back over to sane.

I once worked for a science research company.  There was a mathematician there who, when he had a big problem to solve who would come out into that hall and walk up and down frantically mumbling to himself.  I worried about him. 

 

As for dividing by 0, I still say you can.  What you can't divide by is "nothing" because the 0 has then become something.  Infinity.  Of course, that opens the question of multiplying it back.  I think that works.  Off to do some more 'pondering.  Another infinity?


Edited by hazelm, 09 September 2019 - 05:42 AM.


#11 Flummoxed

Flummoxed

    Explaining

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 738 posts

Posted 09 September 2019 - 05:58 AM

In arithmetic, division by zero is strictly speaking said to be "undefined".  In ordinary use, one thinks of division by zero as something that would lead to a infinite result, i.e. n/0 = ∞. 

 

In Quantum field theory calculations infinities can be renormalized ie got rid of https://en.wikipedia...Renormalization :)



#12 exchemist

exchemist

    Creating

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2762 posts

Posted 09 September 2019 - 06:59 AM

In Quantum field theory calculations infinities can be renormalized ie got rid of https://en.wikipedia...Renormalization  :)

Yes I know. 



#13 Flummoxed

Flummoxed

    Explaining

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 738 posts

Posted 09 September 2019 - 07:11 AM

Yes I know. 

 

I know you know :) I just threw it into the discussion, for amusement, and out of boredom :) I wondered if Hazel knew? I will stop posting irrelevant crap?



#14 sluggo

sluggo

    Understanding

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 250 posts

Posted 10 September 2019 - 10:23 AM

hazelm;

 

If integer division means partitioning a quantity into a number of parts of equal size, then you can't divide a quantity into less than 2 parts. If the divisor was 1, that would be redundant and equivalent to doing nothing. Zero isn't a quantity. Rephrased as: when I looked into the pickle barrel, there was 'no' 'thing'.



#15 Farming guy

Farming guy

    Explaining

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 961 posts

Posted 14 September 2019 - 03:41 PM

Although math considers 0 a legit number sometimes it isn't when it associates with infinity. Any answer that is infinity is a wrong answer. I saw an interesting proof recently (from 1790) that .99999 infinite nines is = 1.  At what point do you have enough nines to say it equals 1. The answer is never. How could 2 different numbers be equal? Because if infinity can be  removed from the equation, the equation will have a finite answer.

I was taught to use the phrase, "increases without bounds" in place of "infinity."



#16 ralfcis

ralfcis

    Explaining

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 945 posts

Posted 14 September 2019 - 04:10 PM

Increases to a bound. Like absolute zero. It is a bound but it takes an infinity to reach it.