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Ocean Trash


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#1 Deepwater6

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Posted 07 November 2017 - 02:31 PM

http://www.bbc.com/n...r-the-Caribbean

 

Do you think it would be worthwhile or even profitable to set up and outfit fishing trawlers to collect/recycle this stuff? It would require different rigging aside from just a boom and the regular fishing nets they use, but I think it could be achieved. Not while fishing of course, but if the tourism industry starts to get impacted, would it be something the nearby governments would want to explore?



#2 wiseshopper

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Posted 25 July 2018 - 04:11 AM

There are so many start-up companies nowadays who make an effort to contribute something positive to the environment. It's such a shame that the brilliant ideas aren't being implemented on a worldwide scale.

I hope everyone realizes how crucial taking care of the ocean is! Trash in the ocean = water rises = flooding.



#3 BryceMac

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Posted 17 August 2018 - 05:59 AM

The problem is that those ideas are not developed enough for wide use yet. At least I don't know of any that are.



#4 MadMax003

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Posted 08 September 2018 - 06:17 AM

I think we don"t have an opportunity and funds to clear all trash from the ocean... 



#5 fahrquad

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Posted 09 February 2019 - 09:45 PM

I have snorkeled all along the Atlantic coast from Wrightsville Beach to Key West, the Gulf from the Florida Panhandle to Louisiana and parts of Texas, several of the islands of the Bahamas, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, and the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico.  The vast majority of the trash I have found is plastic.  Although some small amount may come from careless beach-goers or local landfills, it appears that much of it comes from cruise ships.  I am not aware of any authority able to fine a cruise ship in international waters for littering, and it is nearly impossible to prove the point of origin for anything that washes up on a beach.  Short of deploying fleets of skimmer ships to collect the plastic or completely banning plastic on cruise ships, it seems the best option would be to develop biodegradable plastics.



#6 fahrquad

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Posted 09 February 2019 - 10:01 PM

When I was a kid glass bottles could be returned for a 5 cent deposit.  My friends and I used to pick them up along the road to redeem for candy, soda, and fireworks.  Since then plastic and aluminum have unfortunately become the non-biodegradable litter of choice.  The anti-littering campaigns of the late 1970's and 1980's helped, but we are still living in a disposable society that has only gotten worse (and substantially more toxic).