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Quality Of Buildings In Poor Compared To Middle Class Area....


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#1 mt774

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 01:40 PM

When i am in low income poor area i will see many buildings which are not been used since very long time, these buildings will not be closed up or knocked down if nobody using for business purpose but will still be left there for years which makes them unclean and broken up and makes such bad smells come into air, but in middle class area when buildings are abandoned they will be dealt with & made to look clean within few weeks ebven if not in use.

i feel that those middle class area should have their buildings left untouched when abandoned to even out feel and image of areas.

your thought?

#2 Deepwater6

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 07:57 PM

There are middle class neighborhoods around Detroit and other nearby cities that are over 50% empty. They were either foreclosed on or abandon by their jobless occupants. I would agree with you though, it would be nice if lower class area homes could be either fixed up for a needy family or taken down to prevent crack houses etc.,but where would the money come from?

I am in the corner of the Wall St. protesters. Corp. greed has forced middle class America to either have their own version of the "Arab Spring" or just slowly get pushed to poverty. Our government is broken and Corporations own them anyway. It's getting closer and closer to absolute frustration of everybody but the rich and this will eventually get ugly. It may get messy, but usually people are better off after a revolution then before. This change may take decades to recognize, but we should be better off.

#3 Jorge1907

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 01:39 PM

Thanks typically liberal comrades - so much better to punish those who try to maintain their neighborhoods than work with those who don't care.

The Wall Street protestrs have no idea what they are protesting. The current economic criss was as much due to the Fair Housing Act elininating financial resoruce limits in home ownerhip as Wall Street traders falsely tailoring loan packages.

#4 JMJones0424

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 06:10 AM

1) While seeking greater equality, why choose the path that lowers the better off to the level of the worse off? Would it not be more beneficial instead to strive to raise the standard of living of the poorest? Rather than allowing more neighborhoods to suffer the scourge of neglected properties and absentee landowners, shouldn't a community's priority instead be to enforce standards and prevent urban blight through code enforcement?

2) I know of no liberal tenet that calls for the spreading of misery.

#5 dduckwessel

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Posted 23 November 2011 - 01:51 PM

Once a community is in decline then businesses won't pour their money into infrastructure and you can't blame them.

I've heard of some communities in the US setting up their own policing system to keep out trouble makers, thus making their neighborhoods attractive to investors.

#6 Deepwater6

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Posted 24 November 2011 - 01:35 PM

Thanks typically liberal comrades - so much better to punish those who try to maintain their neighborhoods than work with those who don't care.

The Wall Street protestrs have no idea what they are protesting. The current economic criss was as much due to the Fair Housing Act elininating financial resoruce limits in home ownerhip as Wall Street traders falsely tailoring loan packages.


I find it hard that yourself and republican candidates have such a hard time understanding what this protest is about.

No, Herman Cain we don't expect bankers to come down from their skyscrapers and write them a check, but we would like congress to enact legislation to end corporate tax loopholes, predatory lending, and huge corporate subsidies.

No, Newt Gingrich they can't go get a shower and then get a job. There are no jobs out there and many have had their houses taken away by bank foreclosure when their mortgage ballooned so they have no shower. That's the point of the protest...get it?

#7 dduckwessel

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Posted 24 November 2011 - 04:11 PM

...It's getting closer and closer to absolute frustration of everybody but the rich and this will eventually get ugly. It may get messy, but usually people are better off after a revolution then before. This change may take decades to recognize, but we should be better off.


True. Strange how they (the rich) can't see the writing on the wall!!

#8 Abe40

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Posted 14 April 2014 - 11:57 AM

Hi mt774, your posting reminds me of my experience in Chicago. I took up a job as ice-cream salesman the summer after graduation. My sales route took me through some of the seediest part of "South-side". So many houses are left abandoned because the owners had either moved on to better neighborhoods or been sent packing by estate developers.



#9 RainMan

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Posted 14 April 2014 - 07:09 PM

Many of the abandoned buildings in the big cities are owned by out of state investors. When the economy goes south, and their buildings with it, those are the ones low on their priority list of things to improve.