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Muscle fatigue and shaking after excersise


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#1 lurch

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Posted 15 April 2008 - 06:00 AM

hey. for my p.e. btec national a level i have recently worked my muscles to the point where i can no longer lift anything (fatigue). i did this doing fly lifts. i kept a diary throughout the recovery process and have do explain why i felt how i felt.
could anyone please give me a scientific explanation as to why my muscles started shaking straight after exercise. thanks alot your help is much appreciated because i have searched lots of books and internet pages for the answer.

#2 InfiniteNow

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Posted 15 April 2008 - 06:50 AM

Too bad Racoon is no longer an active member here. This is his area of expertise.

I believe it has something to do with the fact that working out literally tears the muscles. You become stronger due to the fact that they rebuild themselves... they repair... stronger than they were prior to the tear. My guess (and please note my apology that this is all this is... a guess) is that the shaking has something to do with the muscles being torn.

Perhaps another viewer of this thread will be able to offer greater insight. Good luck with your questions. :beer:


:beer:

#3 Tolouse

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Posted 15 April 2008 - 08:38 AM

alright

i used to do the workout for the SEAL teams since i was going to go to BUDs and had to keep fit to pass the screening

the reason why your muscles shake is because they are cooling down

have you ever heard the stovetop crack after turning off?

that is what your muscles are doing

because whenever you are excercising a certain muscle group, it causes friction in the fibers of muscles

hours after your muscles cool down where they aren't shaking anymore, there are sometimes twitches (don't worry, i used to wake myself up from my body twitches)

the 'twitches' are the torn muscles that are repairing themselves

hope this helps

*note: all observations concerning this were conducted over 10 yrs of excercising, observation, and experience*

#4 HydrogenBond

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Posted 15 April 2008 - 09:32 AM

Lifting is an anaerobic exercise. By targeting particular muscle groups with a lot of exertion, they will burn more energy then they can get oxygen. The result is incomplete breakdown of fuel into CO2 and H20, with the result lactic acid builds up in the muscles. This acid has an impact on the muscles causing fatigue until it flushes out.

Enough anaerobic training allows a certain type of energy storage molecule, called phosphocreatine, to build up in the muscles, that can form ATP without oxygen. For example, the sprinter who is running 400 meters will burn way more energy than they can supply oxygen into the legs. With a lot of training their legs start to store more of the creatine-phosphate. This will supplement the total energy requirement so there is less lactic acid. If one can get that energy source to build up throughout the muscles of the body it gives the body extra vitality even during low oxygen. There are supplements one can buy, but I prefer o-natural so the body maintains balance.

Phosphocreatine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

#5 Kayra

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Posted 15 April 2008 - 09:35 AM

At a guess (Old man here quite new to the exercise game) I would think that exercising a muscle to the point of exhaustion completely changes the way the muscle response to the brains requests for it to do something.

Since the muscle feeds its position back to the brain, and the brain senses that the muscle did not do as it was told, the brain attempts to compensate and have the muscle move again, this time with more force. Under and over compensation for a muscle not responding the way the brain thinks it should might cause exactly what we experience.

The reason I believe it is the control system is that the shaking (as opposed to twitching) only occurs when I try to do something with the exhausted muscle, not when I am at rest.

Just a guess.

#6 Kayra

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Posted 15 April 2008 - 09:53 AM

with the result lactic acid builds up in the muscles. This acid has an impact on the muscles causing fatigue until it flushes out.


I am reasonably certain that lactic acid is not a waste product in the mucles, but rather a fuel source. A rather large science boo boo for the last century.

#7 nutronjon

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Posted 15 April 2008 - 10:01 AM

Lifting is an anaerobic exercise. By targeting particular muscle groups with a lot of exertion, they will burn more energy then they can get oxygen. The result is incomplete breakdown of fuel into CO2 and H20, with the result lactic acid builds up in the muscles. This acid has an impact on the muscles causing fatigue until it flushes out.

Enough anaerobic training allows a certain type of energy storage molecule, called phosphocreatine, to build up in the muscles, that can form ATP without oxygen. For example, the sprinter who is running 400 meters will burn way more energy than they can supply oxygen into the legs. With a lot of training their legs start to store more of the creatine-phosphate. This will supplement the total energy requirement so there is less lactic acid. If one can get that energy source to build up throughout the muscles of the body it gives the body extra vitality even during low oxygen. There are supplements one can buy, but I prefer o-natural so the body maintains balance.

Phosphocreatine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Thank you for this information, following the link and then googling further, lead to finding information that explains my own physicial condition better than any doctor has explained it. This is very satisfying to me.

Kayra what you said about shaking makes sense if we think of the neuron system as separate for the muscle system. Like the muscle system is exhausted, but the neuron system is not, the message for movement would come through, but the muscle could not respond adequately. Rest allows all the chemicals involved to achieve the balance of inactivity and then restore the chemicals needed for action?

#8 InfiniteNow

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Posted 16 April 2008 - 09:56 AM

As it turns out, Racoon is online right now! :hihi:

So... :xparty:

#9 palmtreepathos

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Posted 09 May 2008 - 09:24 PM

As I stepped up my workout with weights I really started to experience the shakes you describe, often for a hour or so after lifting. I did some research and found info on L-glutamine. It helps in muscle repair and from personal use I found it works very quickly to resolve shakes and quivering in the muscles. Here's why....

L-glutamine remains the supplement of choice for many bodybuilders. It is a free form amino acid that can be found naturally in beans, meat, fish, poultry and dairy products. It is also an important component of protein powders and is one of the twenty non-essential amino acids found in the body.

It is widespread throughout the body and plays an important role in protein metabolism. From a bodybuilder's perspective, glutamine's strength is its ability to reduce the amount of muscle deterioration that occurs as a result of intense physical workouts. Failure to replace the high levels of glutamine consumed during intense exercise could result in greater susceptibility to illness due to a weakening of the immune system. In addition, glutamine stolen from the muscles to maintain the immune system must be replaced to keep those muscles building.

Bodybuilders can benefit from taking 10 grams of l-glutamine each day, preferably taken post-workout to enhance its recuperative effects. As a nutrient that occurs naturally in the body glutamine is safe to take although ingesting excessive amounts could cause an upset stomach.


The Role Of L-Glutamine In Building Muscle
http://www.bodybuild...lements-reviews
/glutamine.htm

#10 Galapagos

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Posted 09 May 2008 - 10:59 PM

Are you making sure you eat enough? If you are new to lifting, you might not be eating enough, and this is probably your problem.
Here is a good calculator to help you find out how much you need:
Estimated Calorie Requirements

#11 palmtreepathos

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Posted 10 May 2008 - 11:27 AM

Nice calorie calculator, Galapagos. I was doing weight loss at the time I experienced the shaking and I also had some issues with fibromyalgia. Thx to weightlifting sites I found the L-glutamine. Now that I am down to my desired weight I could possibly add some calories per the calculator and lifting to build up the tone I desire. :phone: