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Salt Water Electrolysis


Artifact
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I recently conducted an experiment where I ran 21V of electricity through some artificial salt water I made. This solution was 3% Ionized salt and 97% filtered tap water. after placing the anode and the cathode into the solution it began to bubble. I understood from my research that this was the likely outcome, as the hydrogen from the water and the chloride from the salt reacted with the electricity. What I did not predict was the change in color of the solution. After 1-3 minutes the solution began to turn to a gold/yellow hue. after 5 more minutes if this I decided to remove the anode and the cathode from the bottle. I left it to rest over night. When I returned the next day some small orange debris was left at the bottom of the container. and the surface was mostly transparent. If anyone can tell me about what happened during this process it would be greatly appreciated.

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Edited by Artifact
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You didn’t mention what type of electrodes you were using, but that looks like a rust sediment, (some derivative of Fe2O3) which you will get from using iron electrodes.

If you were using copper electrodes, when the copper (Cu) gives up electrons it forms a copper ion (Cu2+) which then goes into the solution, turning the electrolyte blue / green.

I’m no expert , so hopefully someone else with more experience will verify what I wrote or just research it.

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3 hours ago, OceanBreeze said:

You didn’t mention what type of electrodes you were using, but that looks like a rust sediment, (some derivative of Fe2O3) which you will get from using iron electrodes.

If you were using copper electrodes, when the copper (Cu) gives up electrons it forms a copper ion (Cu2+) which then goes into the solution, turning the electrolyte blue / green.

I’m no expert , so hopefully someone else with more experience will verify what I wrote or just research it.

Hey thanks for the response! This makes so much sense I used an iron based conductor instead of a copper. 🤦‍♂️  Will definitely redo this experiment with the copper electrodes.

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On 9/17/2021 at 12:40 PM, OceanBreeze said:

You didn’t mention what type of electrodes you were using, but that looks like a rust sediment, (some derivative of Fe2O3) which you will get from using iron electrodes.

If you were using copper electrodes, when the copper (Cu) gives up electrons it forms a copper ion (Cu2+) which then goes into the solution, turning the electrolyte blue / green.

I’m no expert , so hopefully someone else with more experience will verify what I wrote or just research it.

This is so exciting, I restarted the experiment using copper electrodes instead of iron ones. An immediate difference was noticed. Instead of turning yellow, it turned into a blue green solution just like you predicted. I believe what I have on my hands now is sodium hydroxide, or at least a very impure form of it.69646F80-C7CC-4BE3-80D5-3165C27E29FE.thumb.jpeg.f36ab3edabd080b9898e85ab073a9bfc.jpeg

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  • 3 weeks later...

I have been looking into the process of electrolysis.

The gases given off is hydrogen and oxygen.

Recombining the two gases forms water molecules while giving off a lot of heat.

Whatever it is that splits the water molecule is the key to a future energy source.

Look for a way to accelerate the process, is it higher voltage or what?

You could possibly create a chain reaction, split the water molecule, and then reunite the two gases back to water. Repeating this cycle over and over and over.

This could be the future energy source we need

Edited by atomsmasher
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On 10/10/2021 at 2:10 PM, atomsmasher said:

I have been looking into the process of electrolysis.

The gases given off is hydrogen and oxygen.

Recombining the two gases forms water molecules while giving off a lot of heat.

Whatever it is that splits the water molecule is the key to a future energy source.

Look for a way to accelerate the process, is it higher voltage or what?

You could possibly create a chain reaction, split the water molecule, and then reunite the two gases back to water. Repeating this cycle over and over and over.

This could be the future energy source we need

Wow! Super cool concept! I wonder if the energy gained from this process would exceed the power applied to the system in the first place? It would have to in order to be implemented I guess. 🤔

 

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On 10/17/2021 at 9:24 PM, Artifact said:

Wow! Super cool concept! I wonder if the energy gained from this process would exceed the power applied to the system in the first place? It would have to in order to be implemented I guess.

The object of the game is to get as much of whatever it is you want.

If your objective is to create as much heat as you can, uniting H2 & O gives off more heat than any other process per unit volume of mass.

As I see it, today;.,.,.,.,.,,,. tomorrow I might see this differently

And no, there are losses in the process, this is not a perpetual motion machine.

Then again.,,.,,,.,.,.,.,.,,.,,

Edited by atomsmasher
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On 10/21/2021 at 7:27 PM, atomsmasher said:

The object of the game is to get as much of whatever it is you want.

If your objective is to create as much heat as you can, uniting H2 & O gives off more heat than any other process per unit volume of mass.

As I see it, today;.,.,.,.,.,,,. tomorrow I might see this differently

And no, there are losses in the process, this is not a perpetual motion machine.

Then again.,,.,,,.,.,.,.,.,,.,,

Do you think you could emulate this is an experiment?

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What I am trying to get at is what exactually caused the water molecule to split?

We know that direct current passes from a positive pole to a negative pole submerged in saltwater. In the process oxygen atoms collects on one pole and hydrogen on the other.

 Others may have already discovered this, but I want to know if changing the current amperage accelerates the process and if not, are their other changes that could be done to accelerate the process?

What if the two poles are attached to wafers, flat disks that creates more surface area for the oxygen and hydrogen atoms to collect on?

What if-?

(:-

 

 

Edited by atomsmasher
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