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Somebody had to do it...


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#18 Freddy

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Posted 13 June 2006 - 09:06 PM

History in high school was bland and boring. I think there was too much that "somebody" found offensive, so we were taught the drab bits. History in college was mesmerizing--great teacher--great lectures.

I am particularly fascinated with the way History seems to transmogrify with sudden saltations or "leaps" of new facts and interpretation. For example, the History of Christianity has for centuries suffered from a near total lack of evidence for the origin of that religion, and its first 400 years. First, Constantine took it as his state religion. Then nothing. Suddenly, 400 years later, there was Pope Leo II, on the throne in Rome, issuing bulls and burning pagans. What happened?

Over the last century and a half, a wealth of archeological evidence has emerged. Including the Gnostic Gospels which had nearly been eradicated from the Earth--by the early Roman Church, apparently. A factless and boring story has now become a great mystery and riddle, with piles of evidence and smoking guns!! Fascinating!!

I am well aware that there are millions of people who do NOT like this turn of events.


Constantine the Great did not make Christianity the state religion of Rome during his lifetime, he only put it on an equal footing. In fact, he only converted on his deathbed in 338. He followed his original faith, the pagan, Sol Inviticus cult, throughout his life while financing Christian churches and missions throughout the Empire. Talk about a conflicted ruler. Actually, he used Christianity as a means to better organize the empire. He also murdered one son and that son's mother. Some Christian he was. It was the emperor Theodosious in 392 who made Christianity the official state religion of the Roman Empire.

#19 Qfwfq

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Posted 14 June 2006 - 03:15 AM

History in high school was bland and boring. I think there was too much that "somebody" found offensive, so we were taught the drab bits.

Not over here!

#20 Jay-qu

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Posted 14 June 2006 - 05:51 AM

I wouldn't quite call them exceptions though, how about the Roman Empire, Charlemagne and the Middle ages, the French and American revolutions and what led up to them, just to mention prominent things.

I can still remember, back when I was at high school, the teacher starting the subject by explaining why we study it. The answer is simple, understanding history helps to understand who we are and why things are the way they are.

did a mention of 'to learn from our mistakes' come up? I think thats an important part of history, although it may not be used that way all that often..

#21 Qfwfq

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Posted 14 June 2006 - 07:53 AM

Indeed many people don't heed Santayana's advice!

#22 Pyrotex

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Posted 14 June 2006 - 10:23 AM

Constantine the Great did not make Christianity the state religion of Rome during his lifetime, he only put it on an equal footing. In fact, he only converted on his deathbed in 338. He followed his original faith, the pagan, Sol Inviticus cult, throughout his life while financing Christian churches and missions throughout the Empire. Talk about a conflicted ruler. Actually, he used Christianity as a means to better organize the empire. He also murdered one son and that son's mother. Some Christian he was. It was the emperor Theodosious in 392 who made Christianity the official state religion of the Roman Empire.

You are correct. Constantine wasn't in Rome, but in what became Constantinople, so of course, he couldn't say anything about Rome's policies. However, what I meant was that he chose Christianity as the ("a") official religion for Asia Minor (Turkey). Its spread to Rome occurred later as you said.

If I had a point (?) it was that this history is totally unknown to most Christians today. They have their own "tradition" of what happened, that smooths over all the rough spots. Now that new evidence is coming to light, the pressure to either suppress or accept the history of early Christianity may get "turbulent".