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Hypernuclei In Genetics

biochemistry nuclear physics

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#1 Anchovyforestbane

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Posted 30 January 2020 - 07:23 PM

Wasn't sure if this was better suited to the physics forum or biology forum, but I feel like it applies more to biology. A query commonly posed amidst my thoughts is what would happen should, by any means possible, exotic matter such as hypernuclei be present in one's gene structure. Would the presence of strange quarks alter gene transcription in any manner? Would gene transcription even be possible? Or would there be effectively no difference in the biochemistry whatsoever? What are your thoughts?



#2 VictorMedvil

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Posted 31 January 2020 - 12:28 PM

Wasn't sure if this was better suited to the physics forum or biology forum, but I feel like it applies more to biology. A query commonly posed amidst my thoughts is what would happen should, by any means possible, exotic matter such as hypernuclei be present in one's gene structure. Would the presence of strange quarks alter gene transcription in any manner? Would gene transcription even be possible? Or would there be effectively no difference in the biochemistry whatsoever? What are your thoughts?

Genes, as they are nothing more than chemicals, are made of atoms if they could not be made of higher level matter as they do not form atoms, thus if strange quarks were present gene transcription would be impossible. There is also the concept that the strange quarks would decay releasing gamma spectrum radiation, thus breaking the DNA around the strange quarks making gene transcription more difficult, If the strange quarks were stable and just around the DNA it, there would be no difference in biochemistry what so ever besides maybe a space issue as the strange quarks would take up space within the nucleus of a cell possibly blocking messager RNA from entry into the ribosomes or blocking  proteins from replicating DNA.


Edited by VictorMedvil, 31 January 2020 - 12:42 PM.

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#3 Anchovyforestbane

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Posted 31 January 2020 - 06:22 PM

Genes, as they are nothing more than chemicals, are made of atoms if they could not be made of higher level matter as they do not form atoms, thus if strange quarks were present gene transcription would be impossible. There is also the concept that the strange quarks would decay releasing gamma spectrum radiation, thus breaking the DNA around the strange quarks making gene transcription more difficult, If the strange quarks were stable and just around the DNA it, there would be no difference in biochemistry what so ever besides maybe a space issue as the strange quarks would take up space within the nucleus of a cell possibly blocking messager RNA from entry into the ribosomes or blocking  proteins from replicating DNA.

This makes sense. I thank you for entertaining my thought experiment.





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