Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Super Lightning??


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 Untergang

Untergang

    Curious

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 11 August 2005 - 10:24 AM

Ok, so I was watching the National Geographic channel a few nights ago and it was talking about "super lightening" or something of the sort and that it's above the clouds and somewhat extends into space. Earlier in the program though it said it came up from the ground, but then later it said it was above the clouds, although I may have not been paying close attention I'm still confused, could somebody explain?

#2 Fishteacher73

Fishteacher73

    Coincidence of Molecules

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1646 posts

Posted 11 August 2005 - 10:28 AM

Lightning occurs in a number of forms...
A lot of it is just atmospheric and it doesn't touch the ground. The strikes that to hit the ground are actually met by a stream of electricity that reaches up from the ground to meet the bolt coming down.

#3 erich

erich

    Understanding

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 484 posts

Posted 14 August 2005 - 08:43 AM

I thought you may be interested in this new thread that has evolved from some of my research and correspondence involving fusion power over the last few months.

One of the top lightning researcher in the world, Joe Dwyer at FIT, got his Y-ray and X-ray research published in the may Scientific American,

http://www.sciam.com...F9683414B7FFE9F

Dwyer's paper:
http://www.lightning...F/Gammarays.pdf


and according to Clint Seward it supports his lightning models and fusion work at EPS, Electron Power Systems
www.electronpowersystems.com/ .

He proposes applications as varied as home power generation@ .ooo5 cents/KW hr, cars, distributed power, airplanes, space propulsion , power storage and kinetic weapons.

And also provides a theoretic base for ball lightning:

Ball Lightning Explained as a Stable Plasma Toroid http://www.sciencene...020209/bob8.asp

Clint sent me his new paper on a lightning charge transport model of cloud to ground lightning (If your interested I'll send it,he did not want me to post it to the web yet) and if Joe concurs with it's theory it could mean big press for EPS. Joe suggested some other papers and now Clint is in re-write.

It may also explain Elves, blue jets, sprites and red sprites, plasmas that appear above thunder storms. After a little searching, this seemed to have the best hard numbers on the observations of sprites.

Dr. Mark A. Stanley's Dissertation
http://nis-www.lanl....ation/main.html


And may also explain the spiral twist of fulgurites, hollow fused sand tubes found in the ground at lightning strikes.

Not to blow my own horn, but I got them talking with my E-mail inquires!



Erich J. Knight

#4 Turtle

Turtle

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15452 posts

Posted 26 September 2005 - 10:03 AM

Not to blow my own horn, but I got them talking with my E-mail inquires!
Erich J. Knight

:) I blow a horn in your general direction erich; nice work. I have also found many researchers who will answer a personal E-mail on their subject; USGS scientists for example. I intend to take the time to read those links.
___By the by, have you heard anyone mention noctilucent clouds in this vein?
:D

http://www.nlcnet.co.uk/

#5 erich

erich

    Understanding

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 484 posts

Posted 26 September 2005 - 12:23 PM

I got an error with your link , not heard of such clouds.

This new work By Dr.Kuzhevsky on neutrons in lightning: Russian Science News http://www.informnau...9-13-5_65_e.htm is also supportive. I sent it to Clint Seward and here's his reply:

"There is another method to producing neutrons that fits my lightning model that I have described to you.
It is well known that electron beams have been used extensively to produce neutrons, above electron energies of 10 MeV, well within the voltages reported in the lightning event. (An Internet search produced several articles that reported this). I do not pretend to have researched this extensively, and do not know the actual target molecules or the process, but it appears plausible from what the papers report, and is consistent with my lightning model.
The proposed method you sent to me is a lot more complex, and I would have to say I can not agree with the article as written without experimental results."


A New Manhattan Project for Clean Energy

Erich J. Knight

#6 Turtle

Turtle

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15452 posts

Posted 26 September 2005 - 12:36 PM

I got an error with your link , not heard of such clouds.Erich J. Knight


___Weird :) ; it was good when I posted it. No matter, I have replaced it with this:
http://www.nlcnet.co.uk/
____Off to read your other thread> :D

#7 erich

erich

    Understanding

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 484 posts

Posted 26 September 2005 - 09:19 PM

Very interesting, I'll send the link to Joe Dwyer at FIT and Clint Seward at EPS and see what they say about NLCs. they look so aurora like,

#8 Turtle

Turtle

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15452 posts

Posted 27 September 2005 - 01:14 AM

Very interesting, I'll send the link to Joe Dwyer at FIT and Clint Seward at EPS and see what they say about NLCs. they look so aurora like,

Sweet! In looking for a good link I noticed for the first time in reading about these that they appeared beginning in the late 1800's. More mystery than I meant to suggest & sites for reporting & submitting photos & really contributing to new discoveries. I read those links you posted & find it very interesting. The twisting of the fused ground strikes (I forget the term right off) is new although I have studied the fusing effect a little in geology & these casts are also sought by rockhounds. :)

#9 MrToke

MrToke

    Curious

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 21 July 2009 - 09:12 PM

You know i just herd on tv they don't know what causes lighting to strike. Is this true? I'd be glad to tell everyone.

#10 Glanders

Glanders

    Curious

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 03 March 2016 - 04:44 AM

You know i just herd on tv they don't know what causes lighting to strike. Is this true? I'd be glad to tell everyone.

I would think that the general area of lightening in a storm striking is random but the point on Earth where it hits isn't random.


Edited by Glanders, 29 January 2020 - 02:34 AM.


#11 xTcHero

xTcHero

    Thinking

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 28 posts

Posted 03 March 2016 - 06:02 AM

Necrobump of the eternity?

 

Holy crap. 7 year bump.


Edited by xTcHero, 03 March 2016 - 06:02 AM.


#12 Glanders

Glanders

    Curious

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 03 March 2016 - 06:04 AM

Necrobump of the eternity?

 

Holy crap. 7 year bump.

 

Woopsie, didn't realize lol.


  • xTcHero likes this

#13 petrushkagoogol

petrushkagoogol

    SMIEEE (Jerk who took engineering)

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 612 posts

Posted 15 March 2016 - 03:22 AM

Ok, so I was watching the National Geographic channel a few nights ago and it was talking about "super lightening" or something of the sort and that it's above the clouds and somewhat extends into space. Earlier in the program though it said it came up from the ground, but then later it said it was above the clouds, although I may have not been paying close attention I'm still confused, could somebody explain?


Flachenblitz !