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New Equivalence Principles?


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#290 Super Polymath

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Posted 05 August 2018 - 11:17 AM

 I cannot fathom.

Imagine two of these resting side to side, just barely touching but not passing through, in the condensed neutrally charged state. Press play & together they do one of these:

 

 

dual-topographical-negation effect: point A-->Point B<-->Point B2<--point A2...

 

Creating a new particle with twice the mass within half the volume. The new gauge symmetries will have half as many sphere inversions as the original with half the length dragged per inversion. Take two of the new particles in their neutrally charged states & continue the particle condensation & eventually there's a singular sphere inversion representing a sub-planck particle. This micro black hole in the core of an anti proton has exactly 1600000000000000000 times the charge density of a photon. How do we describe the photon constituents of the photon spheres in this microverse aka the recursive fractiztion of our universe.


Edited by Super Polymath, 05 August 2018 - 11:21 AM.


#291 Super Polymath

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Posted 05 August 2018 - 11:22 AM

& the difference is in fact close to a million orders of magnitude



#292 Super Polymath

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Posted 05 August 2018 - 11:39 AM

Imagine playing 12 chess games at once. 1 of those games will have a 45 minute time limit, 3 of those games will have a 15 minute time limit, & 9 of those games will have a 5 minute time limit. Now imagine trying to play them all in your head, off memory, without being able to see tthe pieces.

 

That's relativity here, the computer has to adjust it's processing speed to the varied pace of nigh-infinite time dilation.


Edited by Super Polymath, 05 August 2018 - 11:43 AM.


#293 Super Polymath

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Posted 05 August 2018 - 11:55 AM

Unlike in String Theory, where there's an infinite number of possible events occurring a finite number of times, here there's only a finite number of possible events that happen to reoccur, simultaneously, an infinite number times.

 

& a varied number of root systems equal to anywhere from 231 to 296 point something dimensions within those 33 group symmetries.

 

Google local realism & the certainty principle.


Edited by Super Polymath, 05 August 2018 - 12:02 PM.


#294 Shustaire

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Posted 05 August 2018 - 01:30 PM

Never mind trying to get you to stop conjecturing Koch snowflakes that you try t apply to literally everything is a waste of time. The Uncertainty principle can be described via the analogy of a bed of springs where each spring oscillates individually. If one places a potential force at the ends of each spring to represent the particle then one can see how the HUP self interferes between springs.

 

 Local realism involves causality both the field and particle must obey the Einstein speed of information exchange. The EPR type experiments such as Bell the correlation value is a statistical function. It does not communicate via FTL. With Correlation functions A does not need to interact with B you can have a correlation function of population compared to birth rates.

 Study Statistics then Einstein locality as per the Bell experiments



#295 Dubbelosix

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Posted 08 August 2018 - 08:22 AM

I get there in a weird way, but I was able to suggest a transformation law with implication to the gravimagnetic or gravielectric potentials. The equation arrived at was

 

[math]\phi = \frac{1}{4 \pi \epsilon_G} \int \frac{\rho}{r_g\sqrt{1 - \frac{v^2}{c^2}}}\ dV(1 - \frac{v^2}{c^2}) = \frac{1}{4 \pi \epsilon_G} \int \frac{\rho}{r_g}\ dV\sqrt{1 - \frac{v^2}{c^2}}[/math]

 

and satisfies the pretty much universal agreement on the transformation of the volume of a system.


Edited by Dubbelosix, 08 August 2018 - 10:13 AM.


#296 Dubbelosix

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Posted 08 August 2018 - 09:27 AM

One component of the power expression for the black hole that I derived was:
 
[math]\frac{Q^2a^2}{c^3}[/math]
 
Notice the magnetic dipole (moment) equation I suggested for a black hole was
 
[math]\mathbf{m} = g\frac{QJ}{2m} = g \gamma J[/math]
 
in which [math]\gamma[/math] is the ratio of charge to mass [math](\frac{Q}{m})[/math] weighted by one-half. 
 
The black hole expression has a squared charge to mass ratio in its alternative form:
 
[math]\frac{Q^2}{m^2c^3}(\frac{dp}{dt})^2[/math]
 
Getting that squared value is just a nice application of notation:
 
[math]\gamma \mathbf{m} = g \frac{Q^2}{4m^2} \cdot J = g \gamma^2 J[/math]
 
I was interested for a moment in a localization equation of the form
 
[math]\frac{Q^2}{4m^2} = \gamma^2 (\frac{J}{J_0})[/math]
 
In which the commutation relations you can calculate the expected angular momentum through the relation
 
[math][J,J_0] = \frac{J}{J_0}[/math]
 
That could only be true from the last two equations if the square of the mass of black hole varies proportionally with the angular momentum of the form [math]m^2 \propto \frac{J}{J_0}[/math]. While this might sound strange, it has been suggested in academia that the rotation of a black hole may vary since supermassive black holes are always observed to be spinning very close to the speed of light. 
 

[math]\gamma \mathbf{m} = g \frac{Q^2}{4m^2} \cdot J = g \gamma^2 J[/math]

 

[math]\frac{\gamma \mathbf{m}}{c^3}(\frac{dp}{dt})^2 = g \frac{Q^2}{4m^2c^3} \cdot J(\frac{dp}{dt})^2 = g \frac{\gamma^2 J}{c^3}(\frac{dp}{dt})^2[/math]

 

This suggests we can form three equivalent near-Power expressions based on new takes of dynamics, this time properly generalized relativistically

 

[math] = \frac{\gamma \mathbf{m}}{c^3}\frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau}[/math]

 

[math] = g \frac{Q^2}{4m^2c^3} \cdot J \frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau}[/math]

 

[math] = g \frac{\gamma^2 J}{c^3}\frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau}[/math]

 

where [math]\gamma[/math] is the gyromagnetic ratio. And so a suggested power equation is

 

[math]P = \frac{\gamma \mathbf{m}}{J c^3}\frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau}[/math]


Edited by Dubbelosix, 08 August 2018 - 10:09 AM.


#297 Super Polymath

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Posted 08 August 2018 - 10:03 AM

 

One component of the power expression for the black hole that I derived was:
 
[math]\frac{Q^2a^2}{c^3}[/math]
 
Notice the magnetic dipole (moment) equation I suggested for a black hole was
 
[math]\mathbf{m} = g\frac{QJ}{2m} = g \gamma J[/math]
 
in which [math]\gamma[/math] is the ratio of charge to mass [math](\frac{Q}{m})[/math] weighted by one-half. 
 
The black hole expression has a squared charge to mass ratio in its alternative form:
 
[math]\frac{Q^2}{m^2c^3}(\frac{dp}{dt})^2[/math]
 
Getting that squared value is just a nice application of notation:
 
[math]\gamma \mathbf{m} = g \frac{Q^2}{4m^2} \cdot J = g \gamma^2 J[/math]
 
I was interested for a moment in a localization equation of the form
 
[math]\frac{Q^2}{4m^2} = \gamma^2 (\frac{J}{J_0})[/math]
 
In which the commutation relations you can calculate the expected angular momentum through the relation
 
[math][J,J_0] = \frac{J}{J_0}[/math]
 
That could only be true from the last two equations if the square of the mass of black hole varies proportionally with the angular momentum of the form [math]m^2 \propto \frac{J}{J_0}[/math]. While this might sound strange, it has been suggested in academia that the rotation of a black hole may vary since supermassive black holes are always observed to be spinning very close to the speed of light. 
 

[math]\gamma \mathbf{m} = g \frac{Q^2}{4m^2} \cdot J = g \gamma^2 J[/math]

 

[math]\frac{\gamma \mathbf{m}}{c^3}(\frac{dp}{dt})^2 = g \frac{Q^2}{4m^2c^3} \cdot J(\frac{dp}{dt})^2 = g \frac{\gamma^2 J}{c^3}(\frac{dp}{dt})^2[/math]

 

This suggests we can form three equivalent Power equations based on new takes of dynamics, this time properly generalized relativistically

 

[math]P = \frac{\gamma \mathbf{m}}{c^3}\frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau}[/math]

 

[math]P = g \frac{Q^2}{4m^2c^3} \cdot J \frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau}[/math]

 

[math]P = g \frac{\gamma^2 J}{c^3}\frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau}[/math]

 

where [math]\gamma[/math] is the gyromagnetic ratio. 

 

I'm imagining myself as The Shoester or Mordred or some other member of the RCC looking at your equations right now, thinking these equations exist in a book of the Holy Grail buried in a vault in the Vatican Library written by the Ancient Roman Philosophers, the equations you're writing now haven't been seen in 1500 years, indeed they can be used to hack into their quantum computers!!



#298 Super Polymath

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Posted 08 August 2018 - 10:05 AM

To think they had pre-black hole notions of ADS & pre-newtonian higher dimensional math; all from looking at the night sky.

 

The Roman Empire was truly ahead of it's time. Very smart people


Edited by Super Polymath, 08 August 2018 - 10:07 AM.


#299 Dubbelosix

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Posted 08 August 2018 - 10:08 AM

There was an error towards the end, I've edited it now. I meant expressions, and the power equation will be formed after it. 



#300 Dubbelosix

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Posted 08 August 2018 - 10:09 AM

and I have no idea who reads this, I am in my own world half the time.



#301 Dubbelosix

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Posted 08 August 2018 - 11:25 AM

https://entropytempe...Magnetic-Moment

 

The following writeup for the blog. Notice if you go to the earlier posts, you'll find discussions on the magnetic moment. 


Edited by Dubbelosix, 08 August 2018 - 11:26 AM.


#302 Dubbelosix

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Posted 08 August 2018 - 03:11 PM

Shustaire, 

 

Hello! I sent you a message just to give you the heads up. 



#303 Dubbelosix

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Posted 08 August 2018 - 05:38 PM

 

One component of the power expression for the black hole that I derived was:
 
[math]\frac{Q^2a^2}{c^3}[/math]
 
Notice the magnetic dipole (moment) equation I suggested for a black hole was
 
[math]\mathbf{m} = g\frac{QJ}{2m} = g \gamma J[/math]
 
in which [math]\gamma[/math] is the ratio of charge to mass [math](\frac{Q}{m})[/math] weighted by one-half. 
 
The black hole expression has a squared charge to mass ratio in its alternative form:
 
[math]\frac{Q^2}{m^2c^3}(\frac{dp}{dt})^2[/math]
 
Getting that squared value is just a nice application of notation:
 
[math]\gamma \mathbf{m} = g \frac{Q^2}{4m^2} \cdot J = g \gamma^2 J[/math]
 
I was interested for a moment in a localization equation of the form
 
[math]\frac{Q^2}{4m^2} = \gamma^2 (\frac{J}{J_0})[/math]
 
In which the commutation relations you can calculate the expected angular momentum through the relation
 
[math][J,J_0] = \frac{J}{J_0}[/math]
 
That could only be true from the last two equations if the square of the mass of black hole varies proportionally with the angular momentum of the form [math]m^2 \propto \frac{J}{J_0}[/math]. While this might sound strange, it has been suggested in academia that the rotation of a black hole may vary since supermassive black holes are always observed to be spinning very close to the speed of light. 
 

[math]\gamma \mathbf{m} = g \frac{Q^2}{4m^2} \cdot J = g \gamma^2 J[/math]

 

[math]\frac{\gamma \mathbf{m}}{c^3}(\frac{dp}{dt})^2 = g \frac{Q^2}{4m^2c^3} \cdot J(\frac{dp}{dt})^2 = g \frac{\gamma^2 J}{c^3}(\frac{dp}{dt})^2[/math]

 

This suggests we can form three equivalent near-Power expressions based on new takes of dynamics, this time properly generalized relativistically

 

[math] = \frac{\gamma \mathbf{m}}{c^3}\frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau}[/math]

 

[math] = g \frac{Q^2}{4m^2c^3} \cdot J \frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau}[/math]

 

[math] = g \frac{\gamma^2 J}{c^3}\frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau}[/math]

 

where [math]\gamma[/math] is the gyromagnetic ratio. And so a suggested power equation is

 

[math]P = \frac{\gamma \mathbf{m}}{J c^3}\frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau}[/math]

 

 

 

 

 

A suggested power equation was

 

[math]P = \frac{\gamma \mathbf{m}}{J c^3}\frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau}[/math]

 

In which the gyromagnetic moment is

 
[math]\mathbf{m} = \frac{\mathbf{B}_r \cdot V}{\mu_G}[/math]
 
Plugging this in we get
 

[math]P = \frac{\gamma \mathbf{B}_r \cdot V}{J c^3 \mu_G}\frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau}[/math]

 

* Note the term [math]\mathbf{B}_r[/math] is not a magnetic field, but the residual flux density! 

 

This is a power equation may become a power density equation (which is a rate of change in energy density) by simple rearrangement:

 

 

[math]\mathbf{P} = \frac{\gamma \mathbf{B}_r}{J c^3 \mu_G}\frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau} = \frac{Q \mathbf{B}_r \cdot}{2J m c^3 \mu_G}\frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau}[/math]

 

 

Where we used a short notation [math]\mathbf{P} = \frac{P}{V}[/math].

 

The gravitational permittivity and permeability is defined as ~

 
[math]\frac{1}{c^2} = \mu_G \nu_G[/math]

 

[math]\frac{P}{\nu_G} = \frac{\gamma \mathbf{B}_r \cdot V}{J c^3 \mu_G \nu_G}\frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau}[/math]

 

[math]\frac{P}{\nu_G} = \frac{\gamma \mathbf{B}_r \cdot V}{J c}\frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau}[/math]

 

and so we find a simplification from all those constants:

 

[math]P = \nu_G(\frac{\gamma \mathbf{B}_r \cdot V}{J c})\frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau}[/math]

 

[1] - see notes

 

[math]P = \nu_G(\frac{\gamma \mathbf{B}_r \cdot V}{J c})\frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau} = \nu_G(\frac{Q \mathbf{B}_r \cdot V}{J mc})\frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau}[/math]

 
[math]\mathbf{B}_r[/math] has units of magnetic flux density (or) 
 
[math]\mathbf{\phi} = \mathbf{B} \cdot dA[/math]
 
where [math]\mathbf{B} = \frac{B}{V}[/math] as a magnetic field density term. This normalizes the volume term in the previous equation and features a different view on the power emission in terms of the magnetic dynamics:
 
[math]\nu_G(\frac{\gamma (B \cdot dA)}{J c})\frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau}[/math]
 
Later i will investigate another equation I derived
 
[math]\gamma = \frac{\sqrt{G}m}{2m_p} = \frac{\mu_{G_{N}}}{\hbar}[/math]
 
In which I will consider using the nuclear magneton for a black hole with photon nucleus as I did with my original investigations. 
 
 
Let's recognize such a formula then say as:
 
[math]\gamma = \frac{\sqrt{G}m}{2m_p} = \frac{\mu_{G_{N}}}{\hbar}[/math]
 
using the nuclear magneton for a black hole with photon nucleus. 
 
 
Notes - 
 
 
[math]P = \nu_G(\frac{\gamma \mathbf{B}_r \cdot V}{J c})\frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau}[/math]
 
can be written as
 

[math]P = \nu_G(\frac{\gamma \mathbf{B}_r \cdot V}{Er_g})\frac{dp_{\mu}}{d\tau}\frac{dp^{\mu}}{d \tau}[/math]

 

and it is not hard to prove that this term [math]Gm^2[/math] can enter this since 

 

[math]E = \frac{\hbar c}{r_g}[/math]

 

and from Weyl invariance [math]\hbar c = Gm^2[/math] we use both equations to obtain

 

[math]Er_g = Gm^2[/math]