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#52 Farming guy

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 05:12 PM

Yes, it's the hypothesis in my mind. I'm just trying to prove it.

I always thought it best to try to test a hypothesis rather than prove it.  Attempts at proof or disproof  may leave one more open to confirmation bias.


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#53 houseknight

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 05:22 AM

I always thought it best to try to test a hypothesis rather than prove it.  Attempts at proof or disproof  may leave one more open to confirmation bias.

Well, there are already proved hydrogen vehicles, produced by Toyota, Honda and Hyundai:

https://en.wikipedia...ydrogen_vehicle


Edited by houseknight, 31 October 2017 - 05:22 AM.


#54 exchemist

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 05:52 AM

Well, there are already proved hydrogen vehicles, produced by Toyota, Honda and Hyundai:

https://en.wikipedia...ydrogen_vehicle

These have nothing at all to do with "explosion engines".  

 

They use either slightly modified internal combustion engines or, far better, fuel cells.

 

Fuel cells have the advantage that they are not limited to Carnot Cycle efficiency constraints, as they are not heat engines. In theory I understand you can get 80% efficiency from a fuel cell conversion, though in practice 40-60% is the most that seems to be achievable. 



#55 houseknight

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 08:17 AM

These have nothing at all to do with "explosion engines".  

 

They use either slightly modified internal combustion engines or, far better, fuel cells.

 

Fuel cells have the advantage that they are not limited to Carnot Cycle efficiency constraints, as they are not heat engines. In theory I understand you can get 80% efficiency from a fuel cell conversion, though in practice 40-60% is the most that seems to be achievable. 

Correct, My intention is to explain, that Carnot Cycle doesn't play outside classic heat engines.



#56 exchemist

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 08:24 AM

Correct, My intention is to explain, that Carnot Cycle doesn't play outside classic heat engines.

Well we know it applies only to heat engines, nobody would question that.

 

What is your point, though? Is it that your proposed detonation engine is not a heat engine? Could be I suppose, but how would you argue that?  



#57 houseknight

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Posted 01 November 2017 - 12:12 AM

Well we know it applies only to heat engines, nobody would question that.

 

What is your point, though? Is it that your proposed detonation engine is not a heat engine? Could be I suppose, but how would you argue that?  

This question needs exploration. I cannot answer it.



#58 Farming guy

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Posted 04 November 2017 - 04:23 AM

Well, there are already proved hydrogen vehicles, produced by Toyota, Honda and Hyundai:

https://en.wikipedia...ydrogen_vehicle

Yes, but I believe those are fuel cell systems and not combustion or "detonation" engines, and who is buying them, or can afford them?  My old VW diesel is in the shop for repairs to the body, and I started researching possible replacement options, and I am coming to the conclusion that my best option is to keep patching my old diesel.





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