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Should Tonight's Oscar Winners Say That All People Are Made Of Atoms, And That This Is Why Jobs And Money Shouldn't Exist?

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#1 Mariel33

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Posted 26 February 2017 - 12:21 PM

Whether it's Emma Stone, Ryan Gosling or Nicole Kidman, tonight's Oscar winners could alternatively say that people who don't want Mondays to exist should refuse to talk about science and the universe. 

Do you think any of these actors should say these things, or do you think they would?



#2 Farming guy

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Posted 26 February 2017 - 05:26 PM

There are some fairly crazy actors, but I doubt they are that crazy.   Most of them seem to enjoy the high life that money can buy.

 

Why should we care what they say anyway?



#3 Mariel33

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Posted 26 February 2017 - 05:31 PM

There are some fairly crazy actors, but I doubt they are that crazy.   Most of them seem to enjoy the high life that money can buy.

 

Why should we care what they say anyway?

 

It would be a cool historic moment. It just seems obvious that the status quo is immoral, and because actors are meant to be inspiring anyway, it might as well be at the Oscars that the public and world's population get to have that historic moment.

 

Beyond that, it just feels absurd that history is what it is, given that no one looks forward to Mondays; why did the Roman Empire exist, or the Second World War, or why has reality been companies and lawsuits and festivals when weekends and Mondays make people sad?


Edited by Mariel33, 26 February 2017 - 05:33 PM.


#4 Farming guy

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Posted 26 February 2017 - 06:11 PM

 

It would be a cool historic moment. It just seems obvious that the status quo is immoral, and because actors are meant to be inspiring anyway, it might as well be at the Oscars that the public and world's population get to have that historic moment.

 

Beyond that, it just feels absurd that history is what it is, given that no one looks forward to Mondays; why did the Roman Empire exist, or the Second World War, or why has reality been companies and lawsuits and festivals when weekends and Mondays make people sad?

Personally, I can't really think of any actors that I find particularly inspiring.  Sure, I find many to be entertaining, but I prefer to know nothing about actors so as not to be distracted from the acting performance.  I think giving awards to people who are already being given huge amounts of money is a rather silly thing to do.  Why don't electricians, plumbers, groundskeepers and the like  get awards shows?

 

How do you know that no one looks forward to Mondays?  Some people love their chosen professions, and some of us work every day of the week anyway!



#5 exchemist

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 11:50 AM

 

Personally, I can't really think of any actors that I find particularly inspiring.  Sure, I find many to be entertaining, but I prefer to know nothing about actors so as not to be distracted from the acting performance.  I think giving awards to people who are already being given huge amounts of money is a rather silly thing to do.  Why don't electricians, plumbers, groundskeepers and the like  get awards shows?

 

How do you know that no one looks forward to Mondays?  Some people love their chosen professions, and some of us work every day of the week anyway!

Agree. And very funny that this overblown and self-congratulatory ceremony has been cocked up, this time round. For some reason it has been the lead item of news today. It is hard to imagine anything more trivial.

 

I've nothing against an evaluation of the best film every year, just as there is for the best new novel, but the scale of it and the synthetic emotion make my toes curl. 



#6 Mariel33

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 12:07 PM

Agree. And very funny that this overblown and self-congratulatory ceremony has been cocked up, this time round. For some reason it has been the lead item of news today. It is hard to imagine anything more trivial.

 

I've nothing against an evaluation of the best film every year, just as there is for the best new novel, but the scale of it and the synthetic emotion make my toes curl. 

Should all ceremonies be ended, including all military and government ceremonies? I ask because of the probability that the Oscars is a reaction to the military, Wall Street and government.


Edited by Mariel33, 27 February 2017 - 12:09 PM.


#7 Farming guy

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 04:46 PM

Should all ceremonies be ended, including all military and government ceremonies? I ask because of the probability that the Oscars is a reaction to the military, Wall Street and government.

I don't think it's a good idea to force an end to ceremonies.  A lot of people seem to like ceremonies, even if some of us find them tiresome.  I think we shouldn't make such a big deal about them.  

 

The Oscars and other big awards shows have little to do with anything other than money and the need to feed some egos.



#8 Mariel33

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 05:03 PM

I don't think it's a good idea to force an end to ceremonies.  A lot of people seem to like ceremonies, even if some of us find them tiresome.  I think we shouldn't make such a big deal about them.  

 

The Oscars and other big awards shows have little to do with anything other than money and the need to feed some egos.

 

Is it possible that atoms and the universe need ceremonies, whether it's Oscars or military or government?


Edited by Mariel33, 27 February 2017 - 05:03 PM.


#9 CraigD

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 08:10 AM

The Oscars and other big awards shows have little to do with anything other than money and the need to feed some egos.

Money is a very important thing in our society, some might argue the most important thing, and I think the Academy Awards, for all their near total lack of mention of money, are primarily about it. I think it’s a mistake and misunderstanding to think of them, as you and exchemist seem to, as mere and empty ceremony and ego stroking.

The nearly 6000 Academy members who vote for Oscar nominees and winners nearly all have financial interests in films. Having a film nominated, or better, win and Oscar, can greatly increase the amount of money that film, and thus its investors, make, or decrease the amount they lose.

I’ve noticed that Oscar winning films are often ones that, despite their high quality, were unprofitable in their theatrical releases. Often, after winning, they are re-released, and thanks to their Oscar publicity, are better viewed, resulting in their investors going from losing money to making it. Consider this year’s Best picture and 2 other awards winner Moonlight: according to its IMDB box office/business page, it cost $5,000,000, but in its short October 2016 theatrical run, made only about $1,421,000. Following its Oscar wins, it is now being re-released in many theatres near me, and I would not be surprised if turns a profit.

Although I can’t prove that this actually happens, I suspect that Academy members do favors to for their fellows who have lost money on credibly good films, by voting them awards they would not have had they been profitable.

I don’t mean to imply this financial give-and-take, quid-pro-quo is a bad thing. Rather, I think it is on the whole a very good thing, allowing people to make interesting movies with lessened concern about their financial viability. I do mean to imply that the Oscars are not the simple “best of the year” awards they purport to be.