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The Unintelligent Quantum Human


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#1 petrushkagoogol

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 12:27 AM

A child is like a quantum computer using fuzzy logic and developing experiences.
A human has "collapsed quantum states", akin to a preferred outlook on certain subjects that
are necessary for him to function in society.
 
eg) A child may have ambiguous attitudes towards religion, but an adult follows either -
 
* no faith
* a specific faith
 
This enables him to function effectively in society.
 
Is this realistic ?  
 


#2 exchemist

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 01:45 AM

 

A child is like a quantum computer using fuzzy logic and developing experiences.
A human has "collapsed quantum states", akin to a preferred outlook on certain subjects that
are necessary for him to function in society.
 
eg) A child may have ambiguous attitudes towards religion, but an adult follows either -
 
* no faith
* a specific faith
 
This enables him to function effectively in society.
 
Is this realistic ?  

 

Not in the least. Many adults adopt an "ambiguous" attitude to religion. In fact I suspect such an attitude  is more common than the wholehearted, unquestioning embrace of any religious belief system. There is no evidence that having a settled view on religion is in any way necessary for functioning in society.

 

In fact, I would argue the contrary: a degree of sympathetic detachment on the subject of religion helps a person socially. 



#3 Farming guy

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 09:06 AM

Not in the least. Many adults adopt an "ambiguous" attitude to religion. In fact I suspect such an attitude  is more common than the wholehearted, unquestioning embrace of any religious belief system. There is no evidence that having a settled view on religion is in any way necessary for functioning in society.

 

In fact, I would argue the contrary: a degree of sympathetic detachment on the subject of religion helps a person socially. 

One might say that many of us remain in a quantum state of uncertainty, both believing and not believing.


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#4 Mariel33

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 09:38 AM

People adopt beliefs to help them function, but what happens if all people stop all beliefs?


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#5 petrushkagoogol

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 10:03 AM

One might say that many of us remain in a quantum state of uncertainty, both believing and not believing.

 

That produces the skeptic.  :censored:

 

People adopt beliefs to help them function, but what happens if all people stop all beliefs?

 

Then people stop thinking.... that implies that the wave-function of the individual gravitates to the more macabre option..... :irked:  :irked:



#6 Mariel33

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 10:33 AM

That produces the skeptic.  :censored:

 

 

Then people stop thinking.... that implies that the wave-function of the individual gravitates to the more macabre option..... :irked:  :irked:

Without beliefs, is it possible that there'd be no internet?



#7 exchemist

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 04:24 AM

That produces the skeptic.  :censored:

 

 

Then people stop thinking.... that implies that the wave-function of the individual gravitates to the more macabre option..... :irked:  :irked:

I think it would be good to stop misusing quantum theory terminology. Bandying about terms like "wave function" in a context such as this is just quantum woo, really.