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Inner And Outer Space


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#1 JudgeDracoAmunRa

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Posted 15 January 2012 - 07:20 PM

Here's how you contain infinity within a unity


We're all familiar with the concept of optical reflection. When a beam of light hits a mirrored surface, it gets reflected right?. And we've all seen that crazy situation where, if you set up two mirrored surfaces facing each other, you can get them to reflect each other out to infinity.

Well, here's a concept called spatial reflection. If you create a perfect hollow sphere - and it has to be perfect or this doesn't work - and coat the inner surface with a material that reflects space and nothing else, then the space contained within the sphere gets reflected out in all directions to infinity. In this way, just like light and optical reflectors traps a finite beam of light and reflects that beam of light out to infinity in both directions, space and spatial reflectors traps a finite space bubble within a sphere and reflects that space bubble out in all directions to infinity.

If you have the technology to build such a sphere, and know how to coat it's inner surface with a spatially reflecting material, you can contain an infinite space bubble within a finite sphere.

Of course, when you're inside the sphere, space appears to be infinite in all directions - and in fact it is. However, when you're outside the sphere, it's obvious the sphere is actually only the size of, say, a snooker ball.

Are you science geeks sure you're not trapped within such a sphere?

#2 Eclogite

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Posted 15 January 2012 - 09:04 PM

Would you explain what you mean by the reflection of space? What fundamental particles or field are responsible for this reflection? Can you cite examples of space reflection that are currently known, either naturally, or through laboratory experiment?

#3 Ken

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Posted 15 January 2012 - 11:32 PM

Would you explain what you mean by the reflection of space? What fundamental particles or field are responsible for this reflection? Can you cite examples of space reflection that are currently known, either naturally, or through laboratory experiment?


You saved me some typing.

B)

#4 sigurdV

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 09:32 AM

Space moves?
Supposing your definitions are valid, then tell this nonscientist (...eh... Philosophy and Logic aint sciences are they?) what it means that the space inside gets "reflected OUT"? At first sight it seems to me that all that might happen in this thought experiment is that space inside the sphere no longer will exist close to or at the coated surface.

#5 JudgeDracoAmunRa

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 01:50 PM

Would you explain what you mean by the reflection of space? What fundamental particles or field are responsible for this reflection? Can you cite examples of space reflection that are currently known, either naturally, or through laboratory experiment?


Certainly.

Space can be reflected in the same way light can be reflected. Space is actually a material in the same way that light is a material. Optical-mirrors reflect light. Spatial-mirrors reflect space.

The reflected space is a kind of dimension that inner-matter can pass through. This creates infinite inner-space contained within a finite sphere that exists in outer-sopace.

I cant give any examples of spatial-reflection, because science doesn't know how to do that yet. But in time, science will figure it out.

For the moment, I draw your attention to the phenomenon I mentioned in my OP: infinite optical reflection.

#6 JudgeDracoAmunRa

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 01:53 PM

Space moves?
Supposing your definitions are valid, then tell this nonscientist (...eh... Philosophy and Logic aint sciences are they?) what it means that the space inside gets "reflected OUT"? At first sight it seems to me that all that might happen in this thought experiment is that space inside the sphere no longer will exist close to or at the coated surface.


No, space doesn't move. It's a reflection.

Space gets reflected out to infinity (i.e. into the surface of the spatial reflector) in the same way that light gets reflected out to infinity (i.e. into the surface of the optical reflector).

#7 Moontanman

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 02:06 PM

No, space doesn't move. It's a reflection.

Space gets reflected out to infinity (i.e. into the surface of the spatial reflector) in the same way that light gets reflected out to infinity (i.e. into the surface of the optical reflector).



First of all optical reflections do not reflect out to infinity, try the mirror thing and you will see that, there are no perfectly reflective surfaces, secondly your assertion that space can be reflected and that we will find a way to do so is nonsensical unless you can show space is something that can be reflected to begin with...

#8 JudgeDracoAmunRa

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 02:06 PM

First of all optical reflections do not reflect out to infinity, try the mirror thing and you will see that, there are no perfectly reflective surfaces, secondly your assertion that space can be reflected and that we will find a way to do so is nonsensical unless you can show space is something that can be reflected to begin with...


You've hit the nail on the head about the mirror thing. The reason why optical reflections do not (as yet) reflect out to infinity is because the reflective surfaces are not perfect. If you re-read my post, you'll see that I indicated the sphere had to be perfect or the reflection thing wouldn't work.

As for the reflection of space, well, let's start with a simple concept then. Do you know what I mean by a "unity"?

It's similar to a quantum: In physics, a quantum is the minimum amount of any physical entity involved in an interaction.

So a unity is the smallest indivisible quantum that could ever exist. It can be thought of as a perfect sphere. It cannot be destroyed (because it is a "unity" it represents the mathematical concept called "1" - try dividing "1" by anything real and see how far you get).

Show me you understand this much, and I'll take you a step further. :unsure:

#9 JudgeDracoAmunRa

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 02:08 PM

First of all optical reflections do not reflect out to infinity, try the mirror thing and you will see that, there are no perfectly reflective surfaces, secondly your assertion that space can be reflected and that we will find a way to do so is nonsensical unless you can show space is something that can be reflected to begin with...


Hey, what's your IQ then Mr Hello Low IQers? I'll tell you mine if you'll tell me yours! :o

#10 Moontanman

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 02:10 PM

Hey, what's your IQ then Mr Hello Low IQers? I'll tell you mine if you'll tell me yours! :o



IQ is irrelevant here, evidence counts, show yours...

#11 Moontanman

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 02:12 PM

You've hit the nail on the head about the mirror thing. The reason why optical reflections do not (as yet) reflect out to infinity is because the reflective surfaces are not perfect. If you re-read my post, you'll see that I indicated the sphere had to be perfect or the reflection thing wouldn't work.

As for the reflection of space, well, let's start with a simple concept then. Do you know what I mean by a "unity"?

It's similar to a quantum: In physics, a quantum is the minimum amount of any physical entity involved in an interaction.

So a unity is the smallest indivisible quantum that could ever exist. It can be thought of as a perfect sphere. It cannot be destroyed (because it is a "unity" it represents the mathematical concept called "1" - try dividing "1" by anything real and see how far you get).

Show me you understand this much, and I'll take you a step further. :unsure:



I understand that you are constructing a strawman, do i have to destroy it or are you going to destroy it?

#12 pamela

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 02:46 PM

Here's how you contain infinity within a unity


We're all familiar with the concept of optical reflection. When a beam of light hits a mirrored surface, it gets reflected right?. And we've all seen that crazy situation where, if you set up two mirrored surfaces facing each other, you can get them to reflect each other out to infinity.

Well, here's a concept called spatial reflection. If you create a perfect hollow sphere - and it has to be perfect or this doesn't work - and coat the inner surface with a material that reflects space and nothing else, then the space contained within the sphere gets reflected out in all directions to infinity. In this way, just like light and optical reflectors traps a finite beam of light and reflects that beam of light out to infinity in both directions, space and spatial reflectors traps a finite space bubble within a sphere and reflects that space bubble out in all directions to infinity.

If you have the technology to build such a sphere, and know how to coat it's inner surface with a spatially reflecting material, you can contain an infinite space bubble within a finite sphere.

Of course, when you're inside the sphere, space appears to be infinite in all directions - and in fact it is. However, when you're outside the sphere, it's obvious the sphere is actually only the size of, say, a snooker ball.

Are you science geeks sure you're not trapped within such a sphere?

sigh......define space in your opinion, then post what science dictates it is. Then you reflect on that and try again

#13 Moontanman

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 05:49 PM

Hey, what's your IQ then Mr Hello Low IQers? I'll tell you mine if you'll tell me yours! :o



I think i need to apologize to you, i googled you (your line of I didn't know who you were was just too provocative) and I see that you are from the UK. My avatar pokes fun at me, no one else. Bullwinkle the Moose is an icon of old American children's cartoons, he called himself "Mr. Know-It-All" His opening line was "Hello Low IQ'ers" he was a total dumbass, he couldn't do anything right and his little science experiments always ended in disaster. So please view it in that light, it is making fun of me not anyone else...