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#35 Turtle

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Posted 24 July 2009 - 02:14 AM

You do realize that most of your pics would make excellent ID 'tools', right?

Awesome photo! And just for sheets and niggles I'll say, suksdorfii! :hyper:

It never gets old. :hihi: :hyper:


yes i realize that. thanks to you & Cedars, i have a new bag of tricks & a full-blown obsession to use them toward that end. :bow: part of my promote-hypography-as-the-place-to-go-to-get-what-no-one-else-has-while-increasing-my-own-knowledge plan. :hyper: we discussed that a bit as a goal for the wildflower social group(s), but as i say that seems not to have worked out & i thought i'd give a thread a try. if you see an opportunity to better position our wildflower pics or descriptions as go-to resources at hypog, by all means drop me a note or just post it up here. as you see, i hop madly from subject to subject and often don't finish what i start. :hihi:

i have some more seeds still to photograph, and those wild green mountain lupine seedlings i started are getting the first primary leaves. :ip: :rant: so many flowers, so little time. :kuku: :lol: . . . . . . . .. :hihi:

ps suksdorfii seed pods explode when still green and touched. if they're ripe that is, which only 1 of 5 pods i picked was. picked too soon, the seeds don't ripen, get there too late & they have already burst out. timing is so critical i'm finding in collecting wildflower seeds. :rip: maybe i'll tie a little bag on a suksdorfii pod & see if i have better results. yep; no such thing as too much suksdorfii. :rotfl:

pps: this blog entry has wildflower id info unlike any to be found. :D >> http://hypography.co...ny-trumpet-224/

#36 Turtle

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Posted 25 July 2009 - 01:06 PM

say seeed! B)

early blue violet - Viola adunca seeds
july 2009
suburbia
clark county washington - native


Posted Image

seedling of unknown species of lupine from green mountain- 1 week old.
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self heal - Prunella vulgaris seeds
july 2009
suburbia
clark county washington - native


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#37 Turtle

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 02:17 PM

... ps suksdorfii seed pods explode when still green and touched. if they're ripe that is, which only 1 of 5 pods i picked was. picked too soon, the seeds don't ripen, get there too late & they have already burst out. timing is so critical i'm finding in collecting wildflower seeds. :) maybe i'll tie a little bag on a suksdorfii pod & see if i have better results. yep; no such thing as too much suksdorfii. ;)


i was bound & determined to video record the explosion of the pods, and 36 hours later i caught it this morning. :eek: the launch is too fast however to grab any stills that are not just a blur. as you see, the launch is lightning fast. :lol:

the pod has 5-cavities, each holding a brace of seeds for launch. each seed is held pointy end inward, clasped in a white fleshy horseshoe shaped launcher. when the trigger goes, whatever that is exactly i don't know, both the launcher & the seed burst out of the pocket. as far as i have observed, the laucher & seed generally separate during the launch and you can see them gathered on the bottom of the vile. the seed foremost in the image is stuck to the inside of the glass after a launch, leaving me to wonder if the seeds are coated with an adhesive? ;)

but, i run on. :doh: :lol: without further ado: >>
YouTube - exploding pod

#38 Cedars

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 05:02 PM

i was bound & determined to video record the explosion of the pods, and 36 hours later i caught it this morning. :lol: the launch is too fast however to grab any stills that are not just a blur. as you see, the launch is lightning fast. :hihi:

the pod has 5-cavities, each holding a brace of seeds for launch. each seed is held pointy end inward, clasped in a white fleshy horseshoe shaped launcher. when the trigger goes, whatever that is exactly i don't know, both the launcher & the seed burst out of the pocket. as far as i have observed, the laucher & seed generally separate during the launch and you can see them gathered on the bottom of the vile. the seed foremost in the image is stuck to the inside of the glass after a launch, leaving me to wonder if the seeds are coated with an adhesive? :(

Most excellent lab work there turtle!

I will have to take pics of the exploded pods on the meadows. They turn brown before they explode and it appears they burst along the seam and the pod twists giving them a barber pole like look. But its a different type of lupine and we never witnessed the event.

#39 Turtle

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 06:07 PM

Most excellent lab work there turtle!

I will have to take pics of the exploded pods on the meadows. They turn brown before they explode and it appears they burst along the seam and the pod twists giving them a barber pole like look. But its a different type of lupine and we never witnessed the event.


erhm...nice maybe except for labeling what kind of pod. :doh: but thank you. :) it's actually the pod of the western yellow wood sorel, Oxalis suksdorfii & not Lupine. scale to the left has 1mm divisions (forgot to label that too! :doh: :doh: ):(

i agree about what you have seen on the Lupines though, and i don't think they 'explode' or act fast as does this plant. i still have some Lupine cultivars in my flower bed with still-green pods, so i will keep an eye on them for any action contrary to my thinking and look forward to your pod shots. :clue: :lol: :hihi:

#40 Michaelangelica

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Posted 27 July 2009 - 02:12 AM

say seeed! :steering:

seeds of Early Blue Violet - Viola adunca

I am re-building my Violet collection (Viola spp). They are the only things that seem to do well in my crap soil.
So if anyone comes across any seed, I would love to swap or pay postage.

#41 Turtle

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Posted 27 July 2009 - 03:00 AM

I am re-building my Violet collection (Viola spp). They are the only things that seem to do well in my crap soil.
So if anyone comes across any seed, I would love to swap or pay postage.


:eek: people actually collect violet seeds!!! :msn: :steering: :doh: i guess my main concern would be precipitating an ozzy case of viola run-amuckus. i mean what with my seeds not being native d'under and all. if you can convince me it's not a concern, i'll see what i can do to hook you up pro bono.

i did put 3 of the Viola aduncus seeds in peat pots to start & so far they have just set there.:( perhaps they are physically dormant & need a bit of roughing up to get the show on the road. :hihi: as the plants grow runners, cuttings might be my better option for propogating them here.

that's it. . . . . . . :rotfl:

#42 Michaelangelica

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Posted 27 July 2009 - 03:24 AM

i guess my main concern would be precipitating an ozzy case of viola run-amuckus. i mean what with my seeds not being native d'under and all. if you can convince me it's not a concern, i'll see what i can do to hook you up pro bono.

Thanks Turtle,
The feral Oz customs have a list of what they will allow and what is prohibited. The ICON data base:-
ICON Database - Import Conditions - DAFF
I just had some seeds of a grass impounded because the Yank supplier put the wrong name on them. This has been sorted and i am waiting to bail my babies. Violets aren't prohibited and i have just found a German source for many. I haven't tried them from seed but plants are difficult unless you build your own quarantine station.

i guess I should start researching how to germinate them. The annual V. conuta is easy

Viola cornuta L. cv. Perfection seeds were germinated on moist filter paper under differing conditions of temperature and pH. The optimum temperature range for germination was between 20[degrees]C and 25[degrees]C. Germination occurred from pH 2.0 to pH 9.0. Solutions of pH 3.0 and pH 9.0 enhanced the rate of germination without affecting the final number of germinated seeds. Water was a better imbibing fluid than buffered solutions. Standard conditions were chosen for rapid and slow germination of V. cornuta seeds. Seeds incubated in water, at 22[degrees]C, in the dark, began germinating two days later. Most seeds germinated [72.7%]by the third day of imbibition and maximal germination [87.6%] occurred by the seventh day of imbibition, Seeds incubated in water, in the dark, at 5[degrees]C failed to germinate through the first 14 days of imbibition but did germinate 21 days after imbibition and were 73.6% germinated by 28 days. Water uptake after one day was similar for seeds incubated at both 5[de grees]C and 22 [degrees]C. Seeds incubated at 22[degrees]C continued to increase in fresh weight for three days, but the fresh weight of seeds incubated at 5[degrees]C, increased on only the first day of incubation.

ANALYSIS OF HORNED VIOLET, VIOLA CORNUTA L., SEED GERMINATION. (22-SEP-00) Bulletin of the New Jersey Academy of Science
Others seem to need encouragement

Viola pedata Birdfoot Violet seeds may be extremely slow to germinate. Germination of birdsfoot violet seeds may be improved with an overnight soak in GA3 (Gibberellic acid) resulting in germination in approximately 10 days. Some of my customers also suggest pre-soaking hard to germinate birdfoot violet seeds in a kelp solution for 24 hours before planting.

Viola pedata, Birdfoot Violet, Pansy Violet Plants & Seeds

A bit on Viola adunca
PLANTS Profile for Viola adunca (hookedspur violet) | USDA PLANTS

Viola adunca is the sole source of food for the endangered Oregon silverspot butterfly larvae. For more information on this important native, see our special article about the Oregon silverspot butterfly project


plant description
This is good on germination. It seems they like a lot of cold moist stratification.
http://www.plant-mat...orpmcpr6822.pdf

#43 Turtle

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Posted 27 July 2009 - 09:34 AM

Thanks Turtle,


my pleasure. :)

A bit on Viola adunca
PLANTS Profile for Viola adunca (hookedspur violet) | USDA PLANTS

plant description
This is good on germination. It seems they like a lot of cold moist stratification.
http://www.plant-mat...orpmcpr6822.pdf


excellent! from the latter link, this bit is particularly helpful to me insasmuch as i earlier lamented how hard it is to be on hand before the seed capsules burst open, but after the seeds ripen. (emphasis mine)

Seeds were determined ready to harvest when the capsule they were in turned to
point upward
. Observation led to the belief that this stage immediately precedes the seed pod splitting open, at which time seeds can be lost. Ripe pods were pinched from their stems and put in a cloth bag in the greenhouse to dry. As they dried, most of the harvested capsules split and the seeds were easily separated from the majority of their pods by shaking the bag to settle the seeds at the bottom


the butterfly connection is new to me also and i have never seen these, or any, butterflies on the plants.

i see no mention of propogating Viola aduncus from cuttings, but i'm going to go ahead & try it as i have many of the plants now growing that have spread from seed. should you want some of my seed for this plant and the forces that be align favorably, contact me.

that's it. . . . . . . . :turtle:

#44 Cedars

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 01:23 PM

erhm...nice maybe except for labeling what kind of pod. :doh: but thank you. :) it's actually the pod of the western yellow wood sorel, Oxalis suksdorfii & not Lupine. scale to the left has 1mm divisions (forgot to label that too! :doh: :doh: )B)

i agree about what you have seen on the Lupines though, and i don't think they 'explode' or act fast as does this plant. i still have some Lupine cultivars in my flower bed with still-green pods, so i will keep an eye on them for any action contrary to my thinking and look forward to your pod shots. :clue: :shrug: :cup:


Maybe they dont explode like the sorel (and yes, labeling at least the film would have kept me from embarrassing myself).

Theres still lupine blooming on the meadows (and I hope to go there tomorrow) so I will mark the spots and note where the late bloomers are. But its really a quest for butterflies. Someone reported Reakirts in wisconsin (other side of the state) and its one of my goal butterflies this year.

#45 Turtle

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 01:40 PM

Maybe they dont explode like the sorel (and yes, labeling at least the film would have kept me from embarrassing myself).

Theres still lupine blooming on the meadows (and I hope to go there tomorrow) so I will mark the spots and note where the late bloomers are. But its really a quest for butterflies. Someone reported Reakirts in wisconsin (other side of the state) and its one of my goal butterflies this year.


i'll fix the label at Youtube and repost it. B)

when Rac & i gathered the Lupine pods on the mountain, i didn't even notice that many of the pods were already curled & the seed gone, as the pods were all the same color and the long outline is maintained. lesson learned about the 'by the handfull' appraoch to wildflower seed gatherization. :clue:

to the meadows!! :cup: :shrug:

#46 Cedars

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Posted 29 July 2009 - 08:17 PM

Today I stumbled across some wild rice near the shore. People have been floating around (might be tagging swans, might be checking the rice beds to figure out harvest quota). Usually I dont notice it until the ricing has begun which means everything near shore has been taken or spilled. Its just beginning to flower. I read or was told this wild rice bed is the largest single rice bed left in Wisconsin (phantom lake in crex meadows).

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#47 freeztar

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Posted 30 July 2009 - 07:52 AM

Interesting. I had no idea that rice was such a big deal in Wisconsin until I looked at this site.

Wild Rice Harvest in Wisconsin - WDNR

I wonder how much the licensing is enforced in the field...

#48 Cedars

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Posted 30 July 2009 - 01:29 PM

Interesting. I had no idea that rice was such a big deal in Wisconsin until I looked at this site.

Wild Rice Harvest in Wisconsin - WDNR

I wonder how much the licensing is enforced in the field...


I think its enforced more on the primary ricing areas. I remember being told a few years ago that the Crex DNR staff person was out checking ricing licenses that day and couldnt answer my questions.

I cant speak for other areas of wisconsin, but western wisconsin all around generally takes these things to be privileges and figures the best way to keep the cops out of their ricing beds is to self police. Besides, if one sob is taking all the rice, theres less for the rest of them so you have that self-interest thingy going on.

And they all drink at the bars. Sucks when your having a good time and then a group gets together and kicks your *** for taking more than your share.

#49 Turtle

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 10:43 AM

i noticed a splash of blue along a road while drving in the neighborhood last week, so yesterday i took a walk out to the site for a closer look. :rainumbrella: i thought, perhaps hoped, that i was onto a native, possibly an aster, but alas it was not to be. what i found was the introduced wildflower, Common Chicory -Cichorium intybus.

PLANTS Profile for Cichorium intybus (chicory) | USDA PLANTS

common chicory -Cichorium intybus
july 2009
suburbia
clark county washington - introduced


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#50 Turtle

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 12:37 PM

these flowers are on a dandy 4 1/2 foot tall specimen in a volunteer weed-patch that i have kept watered. :photos:
Sonchus asper - WTU Herbarium Image Collection

prickly sow-thistle - Sonchus asper
august 2009
suburbia
clark county washington - introduced


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#51 freeztar

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 01:53 AM

Excellent photos!
Unless my memory is tainted, your photos have increased in quality since you started them. :clue:

Did you ever get an ID for the purple/blue flower in the wildflower group?
I gave it a good lookin at, but I don't even know where to start with that one. My guess is that it's an exotic that somehow found a home on that patch of dirt. :photos: