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Study: Bilingualism Produces Experience-Dependent Gray And White Matter Changes In Brain Structures Of Adults

bilingualism gray matter white matter neuroscience

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#1 HSE01

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Posted 23 April 2020 - 10:16 AM

An interesting paper was recently released on bilingualism and how it affects gray and white matter in brain structures of adults. The study was conducted by a group of UK-based researchers at the University of Reading.

 

Highly recommend, it's a good read.

 

Source


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#2 Flummoxed

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Posted 23 April 2020 - 11:35 AM

An interesting paper was recently released on bilingualism and how it affects gray and white matter in brain structures of adults. The study was conducted by a group of UK-based researchers at the University of Reading.

 

Highly recommend, it's a good read.

 

Source

 

Being bilingual is also supposed to delay the onset of alzheimers and dementia, by about 4 years. https://www.medicaln...articles/320864

https://www.scienced...80206140713.htm

 

I wonder if speaking bits of lots of languages works the same as being bilingual??? 


Edited by Flummoxed, 23 April 2020 - 11:35 AM.


#3 Mpossum

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Posted 28 July 2020 - 07:45 AM

Great forum topic. I honestly have been learning my language, Chamorro language, as I am part Chamorro, for next to 5 years now. I think that I am a much cleaner and logical person for it; not that there is too much difference, just the fact that I always wanted to be a certain kind of person, and it used to show that I was missing an entire cultural component. Sort of like too American for my kind, as I am more than half white, but I wasn't full white. It also made me realize that, it is kinda logical that if it is impossible for someone to learn a language, there might be some kinks in their thinking. Not to say that people cannot think strait, since they do speaking a language at all, but if it's next to impossible, then I would suggest that maybe there is a learning problem going on. I used to think like this, until I tackled a language head on. I think the basics of most languages, the basic syntax, could be learned on 1 sheet of paper, aside from vocabulary.





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: bilingualism, gray matter, white matter, neuroscience