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Five Dimensional Curvature Model


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#1 devin553344

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 08:37 AM

PDF File Attached File  20191017WaveCurvatures.pdf   420.25KB   0 downloads

 

I'm proposing a new idea using 5 dimensional n-spheres. First it defines the fine structure as a curvature of space which is the origin of matter. All curvatures of space carry the elementary charge as a quantum value. And then that curvature exists 5 dimensional as Planck's constant. This allows all curvatures of space (including particles) to carry the elementary charge and the DeBroglie wavelength:

 

h / (2π) = (e^2) / * c/2) * 8/15 * π^2 * RZ(5)

 

Where h is Planck's constant, e is the elementary charge, ε is the permittivity of free space, c is the speed of light, RZ is Riemann zeta function.


Edited by devin553344, Today, 05:20 PM.


#2 devin553344

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Posted Yesterday, 03:18 PM

Another idea is that the bending of space carries the elementary charge as a charge per bend which forms for particles, also there may exist a bend energy that carries the Planck energy. Then we might calculate that with the natural logarithm of 45 degrees and the infinite charge plane solution. Also 5 dimensional n-sphere volume is used:

 

h/(2π * 8/15 * π^2) * ln(π/4) = (e^2)/(2εc)

 

Where h is Planck's constant, e is the elementary charge, and ε is the permittivity of free space, c is the speed of light.


Edited by devin553344, Today, 09:49 AM.


#3 devin553344

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Posted Today, 09:51 AM

The last solution is a breakdown angle of bending space, where at 60 degrees the energy is near maxed for a bend of space:

 

h/(2π) * ln(π/3) = (e^2)/(2εc)

 

Note: this equation is an approximation. To get the equation accurate one must use loop 1 QED. The equation represents a spin 1/2 pair:

 

h/(2π) * ln(acos((1+a/(4π))/2)) = (e^2)/(2εc) * (1 - a/(2π))

 

Where a is the fine structure constant.


Edited by devin553344, Today, 12:15 PM.


#4 devin553344

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Posted Today, 04:45 PM

There should be multiple solutions since Planck's constant describes waves and particles. And I found one last solution which might make sense for particles and perhaps waves, it uses the strong force adjustment:

 

h/(2π * 2π^2) = (3Ke^2)/c * 2exp(π) * (1 + 1/(4πexp(2)))

 

K is the electric constant.


Edited by devin553344, Today, 04:45 PM.


#5 inverse

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Posted Today, 05:06 PM

external approach

 

 

as a mathematician ,I do not think that specifications of dimension has been obtained when it  has been accepted / assumed that dimension was higher than 3.

 

visualization/appearance and/or usage is a core reason to claim this.


Edited by inverse, Today, 05:09 PM.