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What's The Point Of Having A Dress Code Stricter Than Business Casual?


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#1 randomsoldier1337

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Posted 12 September 2019 - 05:38 PM

Nowadays a lot of people like to fashion themselves in a way that is less traditional. You might see men wear make up or men and women coloring their hair some color that isn't naturally possible. Since society is so free, even among serious scholars (as I see in my department), what is the point of having a strict dress code?

 

I imagine one doesn't want someone showing up scantily clad or maybe there is a uniform requirement to represent a certain party or for a certain type of job but there doesn't seem to be much point for specifying such at social events in places such as conferences.



#2 Flummoxed

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 04:59 AM

Nowadays a lot of people like to fashion themselves in a way that is less traditional. You might see men wear make up or men and women coloring their hair some color that isn't naturally possible. Since society is so free, even among serious scholars (as I see in my department), what is the point of having a strict dress code?

 

I imagine one doesn't want someone showing up scantily clad or maybe there is a uniform requirement to represent a certain party or for a certain type of job but there doesn't seem to be much point for specifying such at social events in places such as conferences.

 

Maybe if you turned up looking like a tramp. People might think you had slipped by the security or reception, and shouldnt be there.

 

Uniforms take the decision making out dressing. If you are a member of a team and you all rack up to work wearing the same team tee shirt, you will all be recognized as part of the team. ie business people etc, often rack up to work in shirt and tie.  

 

In some failing schools teachers have appeared to dress like the students, and be friendly. The children lose respect for the teachers. In good schools the teachers normally dress smartly. 

 

The police wear uniforms, this lends them a little protection in their work, over a person dressed as a tramp trying to stop a robbery. 

 

Uniforms seem to engender respect in most people, except perhaps teenagers who might want to rebel against authority, and maybe also junior lecturers with pink or green hair etc that perhaps still think they are teenagers, and will not conform. 

 

If you dress scruffily and try and sell a product, are you as likely to sell it as some one dressed smartly. 



#3 randomsoldier1337

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 08:32 AM

I think I agree with you. I've seen fellow scholars dress smartly but at the same time have colored hair. Maybe they haven't lost the rebellious streak yet.



#4 Farming guy

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 03:39 PM

Back in college, I was invited to a function which required "professional dress".  I promised to show up in my coveralls.


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#5 randomsoldier1337

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 11:02 PM

How did that work out for you?



#6 GAHD

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 02:08 AM

There's a lot of schools of thought on this topic.

One good example is the service industry where if you're not "branded" as an employee it's rather hard for any customers to know who to talk to. Granted, living in Canada most of the random people walking around the building supply stores know more about what's needed and where it is than the minimum wage highschool dropouts stocking the shelves...but I still need to talk to the people with the store branding on their tabbard to make a purchase. 

Construction and manufacturing jobs dress code is usually a form-follows-function thing.

In schools, it's probably a similar methodology as it's easier to spot "who should not be here" when they don't have the uniform.

As for social functions: Forbes did a bunch of articles on the post-#MeToo world that probably apply. Damage control and preventative maintenance is a thing....especially with WHICH departments and WHICH squeaky-wheel people in them probably fall into your alt-life preamble descriptions.

As an aside: There's a litany of markers there that flag for DSM-5 checks in those that "fashion themselves in a way that is less traditional." But most civilized societies tend to require them to volunteer for that sort of thing.