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How Is Your Math(S)?


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#1 hazelm

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Posted 11 July 2019 - 06:41 AM

A "must read" - or "must scan, at least".  Expert mathematicians are stumped by simple subtraction.

 

https://neuroscience...traction-14451/

 

High-level mathematicians have trouble solving primary school level subtraction problems.  And the fault, of course, is on the shoulders of the educators. 

 

All right.  As an educator, I can only ask:  could not this long-winded story have been written with far fewer words?  :innocent:

 

 


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#2 GAHD

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Posted 12 July 2019 - 01:11 PM

I bet it could have been, but they wouldn't have been able to fill up the page or take direct quotes from the article and still justify ad revenue without plagiarism claim.

It doesn't surprise me though. I've had personal experience with MA holders taking 8 hours of mat-lab simulation time to find an answer for a problem I solved in 5 minutes on the back of a coffee receipt. It often comes down to understanding of numbers as objects/values vs concepts IMHO.


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#3 hazelm

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Posted 12 July 2019 - 01:49 PM

I bet it could have been, but they wouldn't have been able to fill up the page or take direct quotes from the article and still justify ad revenue without plagiarism claim.

It doesn't surprise me though. I've had personal experience with MA holders taking 8 hours of mat-lab simulation time to find an answer for a problem I solved in 5 minutes on the back of a coffee receipt. It often comes down to understanding of numbers as objects/values vs concepts IMHO.

It comes down to something else, too.  Publishers - maybe not all but most - pay by the word.  So, the more words .....   My one pet peeve with many instructive books is their plethora of examples.  They will make a simple statement and then recite example after example after .... on and on.  Most of us would get it the first time.  Don't need to hear four or five ongoing stories.

 

Anyway, when I run into that, I think "extra words = extra money + boredom. 



#4 Dubbelosix

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 06:06 AM

A "must read" - or "must scan, at least".  Expert mathematicians are stumped by simple subtraction.

 

https://neuroscience...traction-14451/

 

High-level mathematicians have trouble solving primary school level subtraction problems.  And the fault, of course, is on the shoulders of the educators. 

 

All right.  As an educator, I can only ask:  could not this long-winded story have been written with far fewer words?  :innocent:

 

Yes well, I've caught some experts out on simple subtraction terms on physicststack so this does not really surprise me. But it happens. Susskind got his units wrong in one of his lectures and couldn't work out where he went wrong, the difference here is that Susskind doesn't mind such mistakes because his ego isn't over the roof. 



#5 hazelm

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 07:02 AM

Yes well, I've caught some experts out on simple subtraction terms on physicststack so this does not really surprise me. But it happens. Susskind got his units wrong in one of his lectures and couldn't work out where he went wrong, the difference here is that Susskind doesn't mind such mistakes because his ego isn't over the roof. 

 

If the story is accurate - and I have trouble believing it - it is a boost to those of us who do not comprehend a lot of the "advanced math".  Let all top-notch mathematicians take notice. 

 

Susskind has company.  I once worked with a woman who was showing a math problem around the departments.  All of the steps in solving the problem were correct (she said) but the final answer was wrong.  Everyone was being very polite and moving on.  I took one look and saw "1 x 0 = 1.  Unfortunately, I said 1 x 0 = 0.  Not at all nice of me.  We all make such mistakes at any level.  Right?