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#1 hazelm

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Posted 03 May 2019 - 08:24 AM

I have a question for our British cousins.  A friend told me two things.  The first I think I knew.  But not the second.  Please tell the facts.

 

1.  The name Cecil is pronounced with a short e.    This I think I knew.

 

2.  Sometimes Cecil is spelled "Cycle" or "Cycel".   This I've never seen.  If it is true, how is it pronounced?

 

Thank you.


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#2 exchemist

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Posted 03 May 2019 - 08:49 AM

I have a question for our British cousins.  A friend told me two things.  The first I think I knew.  But not the second.  Please tell the facts.

 

1.  The name Cecil is pronounced with a short e.    This I think I knew.

 

2.  Sometimes Cecil is spelled "Cycle" or "Cycel".   This I've never seen.  If it is true, how is it pronounced?

 

Thank you.

I have never heard of any alternative spellings for the man's name Cecil. In my experience it is usually mad Americans who mess about with the perfectly good English spellings of names  :winknudge: .

 

There is a female version Cecily or Cecile, from French, derived from Cecilia. I know two British Cecilias, one the vegan daughter of an old rowing friend and the other a lesbian girl who works in our local butcher's shop (?!). Both contract their names to Ceci, pronounced "sessy". St Cecilia is the patron saint of music, hence Handel's Ode etc. 



#3 hazelm

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Posted 03 May 2019 - 09:27 AM

I have never heard of any alternative spellings for the man's name Cecil. In my experience it is usually mad Americans who mess about with the perfectly good English spellings of names  :winknudge: .

 

There is a female version Cecily or Cecile, from French, derived from Cecilia. I know two British Cecilias, one the vegan daughter of an old rowing friend and the other a lesbian girl who works in our local butcher's shop (?!). Both contract their names to Ceci, pronounced "sessy". St Cecilia is the patron saint of music, hence Handel's Ode etc. 

Thank you.  In this case, it was a girl's name and I was wondering if it should have been Cecile or Cecelia or some such.  But,  no,  it is Mary Cecil. 

 

I'd better explain.  This was an older sister who died as an infant.  When they filled out birth and death certificates, one spelled it Cycel and the other spelled it Cycle.   Dad called her Mary Cecil (long e).  I've never seen how he wrote it but Uncle Tave spelled it Cecil and her tombstone says Mary Cecil.  That leaves us wondering if they meant Cecile, or Cecilia or were they giving her her father's middle name?

 

And therein lies the complications of Sir Winston's "two countries separated by a common language".    I quite agree with you.  "Only in America".  But, you see, we had to prove we were a separate nation.  So we drive on the right and wear boots. 


Edited by hazelm, 03 May 2019 - 09:29 AM.


#4 exchemist

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Posted 03 May 2019 - 09:49 AM

Thank you.  In this case, it was a girl's name and I was wondering if it should have been Cecile or Cecelia or some such.  But,  no,  it is Mary Cecil. 

 

I'd better explain.  This was an older sister who died as an infant.  When they filled out birth and death certificates, one spelled it Cycel and the other spelled it Cycle.   Dad called her Mary Cecil (long e).  I've never seen how he wrote it but Uncle Tave spelled it Cecil and her tombstone says Mary Cecil.  That leaves us wondering if they meant Cecile, or Cecilia or were they giving her her father's middle name?

 

And therein lies the complications of Sir Winston's "two countries separated by a common language".    I quite agree with you.  "Only in America".  But, you see, we had to prove we were a separate nation.  So we drive on the right and wear boots. 

The Continent also drives on the right - but French trains go on the left, strangely. 



#5 hazelm

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Posted 03 May 2019 - 10:09 AM

The Continent also drives on the right - but French trains go on the left, strangely. 

It is a human trait.  We like to be different.  Which is why styles keep changing.  Thank you again.  I just wondered if it was an English spelling.  Not.



#6 Flummoxed

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Posted 09 May 2019 - 09:12 AM

I have a question for our British cousins.  A friend told me two things.  The first I think I knew.  But not the second.  Please tell the facts.

 

1.  The name Cecil is pronounced with a short e.    This I think I knew.

 

2.  Sometimes Cecil is spelled "Cycle" or "Cycel".   This I've never seen.  If it is true, how is it pronounced?

 

Thank you.

 

It might be derived from some ones lack of spelling ability and a broad accent from north of the English border. They could pronounce Cecil like Cycel perhaps.



#7 GAHD

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Posted 11 May 2019 - 01:27 AM

Some dialects would pronounce it "Sess el" or "sess isle" or "cee sil" from the original spelling...as for variant spelling I could see some low-brows "hooked on phonix" using those very same phonetics, Same way "La-a" is "Lah DASH AH" not "Lah ah" in certain flavors of ghetto.



#8 Amplituhedron

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Posted 14 May 2019 - 12:04 PM

“Low brow”? “Flavors of ghetto”?

 

African American vernacular English is a dialect — no better or worse than any other dialect, or which there are endless examples. Its historical roots are in southern American English, which is spoken primarily by white people.