Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Popularity Paradox


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 petrushkagoogol

petrushkagoogol

    SMIEEE (Jerk who took engineering)

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 594 posts

Posted 18 January 2017 - 04:49 AM

Charles Bronson was a popular cine artist well into his eighties.
Newton was popular and enigmatic in-spite of being of a nervous disposition.
Unstable individuals on account of certain parameters like advanced age or poor health are remarkably stable in the popularity stakes.
Why this paradox ? :vava:

 


#2 sanctus

sanctus

    Resident Diabolist

  • Administrators
  • 4225 posts

Posted 18 January 2017 - 05:45 AM

Because to be popular you have to be either like the masses want (eg. pop-sgars, hollywood actors,...) or be different enough to make you interesting?



#3 exchemist

exchemist

    Creating

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2761 posts

Posted 18 January 2017 - 01:27 PM

 

Charles Bronson was a popular cine artist well into his eighties.
Newton was popular and enigmatic in-spite of being of a nervous disposition.
Unstable individuals on account of certain parameters like advanced age or poor health are remarkably stable in the popularity stakes.
Why this paradox ? :vava:

 

I don't believe Newton can be said to have been popular. I doubt that more than 5% of the population was even aware of his existence. 



#4 Turtle

Turtle

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15452 posts

Posted 18 January 2017 - 02:32 PM

I don't believe Newton can be said to have been popular. ...


Then why did you say it? :doh:
 

... Newton was popular and enigmatic in-spite of being of a nervous disposition.
...



#5 CraigD

CraigD

    Creating

  • Administrators
  • 8034 posts

Posted 18 January 2017 - 10:35 PM

I don't believe Newton can be said to have been popular. I doubt that more than 5% of the population was even aware of his existence.

It would be a work of serious scholarship, I think, to estimate how many people knew of a given 18th Century celebrity, but given that Newton was, in addition to a scientist and mathematician, a politician, with a couple of years in Parliament, and over 25 years as Master of the Mint and president of the Royal Society, my guess would be that his name and visage was about as well known in England ca 1725 as Albert Einstein’s was in the US ca 1960, well over 50% recognition.

There was much less international communication in the 18th Century than now, though, so Newton’s fame among ordinary folk was, I think, limited mostly to England, and highest in London.