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Alzheimer's Or Apathy?


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#1 paigetheoracle

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 04:06 AM

It is believed in Holland that dementia is either physical poisoning or mental poisoning of attitude towards life. Could Alzheimer's therefore before severe depression or giving up on life (The well kept house & grounds versus the abandoned to nature residence effect)? Enthusiasm is in small things / detail - apathy is letting things drift away from your control (general, not specific awareness - slow recall, unlike when everything is in order and close by: You can get more into a smaller space, when orderly than when disorderly and dysfunctional: The ability to distinguish one thing from another as opposed to everything blending into an indistinguishable mess, is a sign of intelligence and a controlled life versus chaos through emotional confusion (the disaffected, rebellious, self-destructive out to let go of the reins controlling their lives)).

In other words I'm saying the negative emotions we have are about abandoning response-ability and this relates to memory and intelligence (being there to sense and make sense of the world).

#2 ntuc

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 10:38 AM

Well, reasonably and objectively, most people with certain amount of general medical knowledge would know that Alzheimer’s disease is actually a degenerative brain disorder that destroys neurons and neural networks / connections in the cerebral cortex, resulting in significant loss of brain mass. And as such, Alzheimer’s disease naturally should be medically diagnosable through brain scans.

http://en.wikipedia...._comparison.jpg

Edited by ntuc, 04 June 2013 - 10:41 AM.


#3 Knothead

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 09:12 PM

Personally, I doubt that depression is related to Alzheimer's disease simply because I've been depressed for as long as I can remember and I, I, er..... what was I saying? :blink:


It may not relate to your question, but I read an interesting article in the paper this morning about Alzheimer's. It seems that coconut oil might be worth studying.

http://www.tampabay....heimers/2124596

#4 paigetheoracle

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 05:58 AM

Well, reasonably and objectively, most people with certain amount of general medical knowledge would know that Alzheimer’s disease is actually a degenerative brain disorder that destroys neurons and neural networks / connections in the cerebral cortex, resulting in significant loss of brain mass. And as such, Alzheimer’s disease naturally should be medically diagnosable through brain scans.

http://en.wikipedia...._comparison.jpg


My point is that this could be an effect, not the cause of the disease (Use it or lose it). If you left a tap on and it drained a tank, what would be the cause - your lack of control of the process or the empty tank?

Medical science should ask why does the brain degenerate? That it does is an obvious effect.

Edited by paigetheoracle, 05 June 2013 - 06:00 AM.


#5 paigetheoracle

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 06:03 AM

Personally, I doubt that depression is related to Alzheimer's disease simply because I've been depressed for as long as I can remember and I, I, er..... what was I saying? :blink:


It may not relate to your question, but I read an interesting article in the paper this morning about Alzheimer's. It seems that coconut oil might be worth studying.

http://www.tampabay....heimers/2124596


Very droll. Yes I've read that about coconut oil as well, although I've heard it can be bad if left in the shell and can lead to memory loss or even be fatal, if it falls on your head.

#6 ntuc

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 09:04 AM

Medical science should ask why does the brain degenerate?



Well, generally & certainly, under usual circumstances, that could just be a normal metabolic & physiological phase / process of aging particularly when people get older and older.


Next, under other rarely known scenario, maybe one can just refer to the excerpts below and ponder through the related points:


“Extrapyramidal Symptoms


A network of neurons responsible for the motion in a body with coordination is called as extrapyramidal system. The extrapyramidal system gets affected in a number of ways thereby causing extra pyramidal symptoms (EPS), a set of symptoms that relate to the attack in the extrapyramidal system.

Causes of extrapyramidal symptoms:

•Use of antipsychotic drug causes extrapyramidal symptoms in most people. Anti psychotic medicines such as haloperidol used in curing schizophrenia can trigger extrapyramidal symptoms.

Brain damages are one of the causes of extrapyramidal symptoms.”



as quoted from :

http://www.symptomwi...amidal-symptoms



It is believed in Holland that dementia is either physical poisoning or mental poisoning of attitude towards life. Could Alzheimer's therefore before severe depression or giving up on life (The well kept house & grounds versus the abandoned to nature residence effect)? Enthusiasm is in small things / detail - apathy is letting things drift away from your control (general, not specific awareness - slow recall, unlike when everything is in order and close by: You can get more into a smaller space, when orderly than when disorderly and dysfunctional: The ability to distinguish one thing from another as opposed to everything blending into an indistinguishable mess, is a sign of intelligence and a controlled life versus chaos through emotional confusion (the disaffected, rebellious, self-destructive out to let go of the reins controlling their lives)).

In other words I'm saying the negative emotions we have are about abandoning response-ability and this relates to memory and intelligence (being there to sense and make sense of the world).



My point is that this could be an effect, not the cause of the disease (Use it or lose it). If you left a tap on and it drained a tank, what would be the cause - your lack of control of the process or the empty tank?



Personally, I doubt that depression is related to Alzheimer's disease simply because I've been depressed for as long as I can remember and I, I, er..... what was I saying?




Well, rather than we ourselves doing all these inconclusive unprofessional speculations, surely the related medical experts of the relevant fields will be able to give the exactly precise professional explanations to satisfactory clarify the doubts above.

#7 Donk

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 10:22 PM

Well, rather than we ourselves doing all these inconclusive unprofessional speculations, surely the related medical experts of the relevant fields will be able to give the exactly precise professional explanations to satisfactory clarify the doubts above.

If the experts knew everything, there would be no need for research. There's a lot of research being done on Alzheimer's precisely because we don't know everything. A scientist says "this appears to be true, to the best of our current knowledge", not "this is the exact precise answer".

More and more, we're learning that the mind controls the body in unexpected ways. It's long been known that "belief in the treatment is a large part of the cure." Latterly, the placebo effect has been found to cure real illnesses.

From Alzheimer's Research UK

Some studies suggest that enjoying an active life, with lots of interests and hobbies might be beneficial. Other researchers have found that spending more time in education is associated with a lower risk.

Active life... interests and hobbies... education... research suggests that the very things that ward off depression might also ward off Alzheimer's.

Edited by Donk, 06 June 2013 - 10:44 PM.


#8 ntuc

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 02:31 AM

“Some forms of Alzheimer’s and frontotemporal dementia can be caused by faulty genes.”


Well, regarding this excerpt which is quoted from:

Alzheimer's Research UK


it’s once again very much worthy to take note that, apart from the genetic and congenital factors as suggested above, and given the undisputed fact that Alzheimer’s disease invariably involves the phenomenon of brain damages, then the related post-birth causes of it should be reasonably, objectively & inclusively taken into consideration as well, whilst one of the many examples would be the neurodegenerative side effects of certain mind-altering drugs as follows:


“Extrapyramidal Symptoms


A network of neurons responsible for the motion in a body with coordination is called as extrapyramidal system. The extrapyramidal system gets affected in a number of ways thereby causing extra pyramidal symptoms (EPS), a set of symptoms that relate to the attack in the extrapyramidal system - http://en.wikipedia....yramidal_system

Causes of extrapyramidal symptoms:

•Use of antipsychotic drug causes extrapyramidal symptoms in most people. Anti psychotic medicines such as haloperidol used in curing schizophrenia can trigger extrapyramidal symptoms.

Brain damages are one of the causes of extrapyramidal symptoms.”



as quoted from :

http://www.symptomwi...amidal-symptoms



Additional Information:

http://en.wikipedia...._comparison.jpg - Alzheimer's disease brain comparison.jpg


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Other Details:


http://scienceforums...ts/page__st__30

http://scienceforums..._60#entry327945

Edited by ntuc, 01 July 2013 - 04:19 AM.


#9 Eclogite

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 06:19 AM

My point is that this could be an effect, not the cause of the disease (Use it or lose it). If you left a tap on and it drained a tank, what would be the cause - your lack of control of the process or the empty tank?

Medical science should ask why does the brain degenerate? That it does is an obvious effect.

While there is certainly a great deal still to be learned about Alzheimer's we know enough to say, with confidence, that your questions generally reflect and almost total lack of that knowledge.

#10 CraigD

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 02:18 AM

Well, reasonably and objectively, most people with certain amount of general medical knowledge would know that Alzheimer’s disease is actually a degenerative brain disorder that destroys neurons and neural networks / connections in the cerebral cortex, resulting in significant loss of brain mass. And as such, Alzheimer’s disease naturally should be medically diagnosable through brain scans.

http://en.wikipedia...._comparison.jpg


My point is that this could be an effect, not the cause of the disease (Use it or lose it).

Since there’s yet no strong consensus on the underlying cause of most cases of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), only several promising but tentative hypotheses, we can’t say with certainty that condition like depression, or simply too little challenging mental activity, aren’t contributing causes. However, without well controlled statistical data showing a strong correlation between the two, which to the best of my knowledge doesn’t exist, the suggestion that depression is a contributing cause of AD is just unsupported speculation. The suggestion that it’s the only cause is strongly contradicted by lots of data showing that many people who never self-report or are diagnosed with depression succumb to AD, and many people suffering from mild to severe AD who, even then, don’t exhibit signs of depression.

While little is known with confidence about the underlying cause of most cases of AD, the presence in the brain of distinct protein structures known as amyloid plaques is a required characteristic of it. Practically by definition, dementia without the presence of amyloid plaques in the brain is a disorder other than AD.

Also, while little is known with confidence about the underlying cause of most cases of AD, a minority of cases (estimated between 1% and 5%) are known to be caused by abnormalities in a specific gene that expresses a precursor protein for amyloid known as amyloid precursor protein (APP). Essentially all people with this genetic abnormality develop AD by the age of 40, showing that in their cases, AD is almost certainly caused by this abnormal gene, and supporting the hypothesis that this gene and the genes that regulate it cause most or all cases of AD.

Given this strong and definite understanding of the role of a single gene in causing AD, we might wonder why AD can’t be prevented or cured by “knocking out” or otherwise suppressing the gene. Unfortunately, such a simple approach would likely cause severe mental disorders, as APP appears to play an important role in the formation of long term memories, and likely in brain formation.

Medical science should ask why does the brain degenerate? That it does is an obvious effect.

Medical science asks this question a lot. For just AD, this google search shows there are over 1,000 academic papers published each month!

#11 Kahlil

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 06:58 PM

Up to this day, Alzheimer's disease has remained a mystery, and the medical community has yet to unravel the cause of the disease. Brain imaging results though have shown that the hallmark of Alzheimer's is the presence of plaques in the brain of the patients and that it is a degenerative disease.