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#18 freeztar

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 12:52 AM

woo hoo! :evil: found this sensitive 'ranked' wildflower species right in my veggy garden hiding behind the bush beans.


I'm curious. Did you measure the petal lengths?

Identification Tips: Oxalis suksdorfii is most closely related to
O. stricta, O. dillenii, and O. corniculata. These species can be
distinguished by their petal length and number of peduncles. The
petals of O. suksdorfii are ½ to ¾ in. (12 to 20 mm) long, and it has 1
to 2 flowers. The petals of O. stricta, O. dillenii, and O. corniculata are
1/8 to ¼ in. (4 to 9 mm) long, and they have 1 to 7 flowers.

http://www1.dnr.wa.g.../pdf/oxasuk.pdf

Cool photo of the pink ladyslipper Cedars!

Violets are tricky. Between adunca and odorata, I'd say you are correct Turtle.

:rant:

#19 Turtle

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 01:20 AM

I'm curious. Did you measure the petal lengths?


http://www1.dnr.wa.g.../pdf/oxasuk.pdf


i did not Sir. :doh: rest assured i shall not now rest 'til i have measured yon yellow petals, both kurz und lang. :lol: excellent source by the way thank you very much freezy san. :bow: it's now in my new & growing plants links folder. :hyper: the flowers were closed when i was out looking today, and i found 2 or 3 more of the plants also hiding among the bush beans. :lol:


Violets are tricky. Between adunca and odorata, I'd say you are correct Turtle. :)


roger. i plan on getting some photos of the main plant in situ where it came up volunteer. also some shots of the seed pods before & after 'sploding. i have new babies some 6 feet away from this main plant. :doh: i have only got maybe 8 seeds though, and they were still clinging to the pod husks. i was thinking maybe if i put a little plastic wrap around a pod that hasn't blown yet & catch all the seeds. :evil:

thanks for your part keeping me on the hard nut details these many years frezrtar san, if i may mention it. :bow: it's more important than ever now as my precision is going to mean life or death, help or hinder, as i weed out friend plant from foe plant. :rant: you will be assimilated! ;)

#20 freeztar

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 02:10 AM

i did not Sir. :bow: rest assured i shall not now rest 'til i have measured yon yellow petals, both kurz und lang. :doh: excellent source by the way thank you very much freezy san. :bow: it's now in my new & growing plants links folder. :lol: the flowers were closed when i was out looking today, and i found 2 or 3 more of the plants also hiding among the bush beans. :lol:


I don't normally measure petals either. ;)
"A flower so sweet can not be measured." - (I've got dibs if no one else has it)

roger. i plan on getting some photos of the main plant in situ where it came up volunteer. also some shots of the seed pods before & after 'sploding. i have new babies some 6 feet away from this main plant. ;)


Coolio. (which infers coolness rather than a reference to the rapper Coolio, which would completely lameify this post).

i have only got maybe 8 seeds though, and they were still clinging to the pod husks. i was thinking maybe if i put a little plastic wrap around a pod that hasn't blown yet & catch all the seeds. :evil:

Plastic works great for plants as you are using it. Placing the plastic on the plants is not a good idea, imho. A better way to catch the seeds might be to use some cheesecloth. Fwiw, I've been buying my garlic in packs of 5 packaged in cheese cloth. I'm saving the 'cloth' for a sprouting project, but it could be equally useful for the purposes you seek. Another idea is to place paper baglettes around the seed heads. The idea is to not stifle gas transfer so much as well as to keep a bare necessity of moisture.

thanks for your part keeping me on the hard nut details these many years frezrtar san, if i may mention it. :) it's more important than ever now as my precision is going to mean life or death, help or hinder, as i weed out friend plant from foe plant. :rant: you will be assimilated! :hyper:


The honor is mine Don Turtle.
Positive curiosity begets positive curiosity.

Now, who's next for the dastardly shovel?! :doh:

#21 Turtle

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 10:40 AM

...Plastic works great for plants as you are using it. Placing the plastic on the plants is not a good idea, imho. A better way to catch the seeds might be to use some cheesecloth. Fwiw, I've been buying my garlic in packs of 5 packaged in cheese cloth. I'm saving the 'cloth' for a sprouting project, but it could be equally useful for the purposes you seek. Another idea is to place paper baglettes around the seed heads. The idea is to not stifle gas transfer so much as well as to keep a bare necessity of moisture.


gracias. :thumbs_up

here's a shot of the blue violet plant where it came up. talk about rocky ground! :hihi: i never thought to smell the flowers, and a strong smell seems to be key on that invader species. :doh: missed another opportunity to stop & :hyper:smell the flowers!

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here's a detail of the violet with a scale. the un-exploded seed pod is on the left and you can see a single seed still in one of the exploded pods at right-central. :clue:

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#22 Turtle

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 10:48 AM

detail shots on the suspected western yellow wood sorel. :clue: :hihi: :thumbs_up

entire plant
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closed bloom
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seed pod
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#23 freeztar

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 12:52 PM

Upon further review (awesome pics Turtle!), I'm comfortable with calling the violet an adunca. Nice! :thumbs_up

The oxalis is still a bit troubling. Can you measure the petals when open? Also, how many flowers does it have? (it looks like it has 4-5 peduncles, yes/no?)

#24 Turtle

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 02:50 PM

Upon further review (awesome pics Turtle!), I'm comfortable with calling the violet an adunca. Nice! ;)

The oxalis is still a bit troubling. Can you measure the petals when open? Also, how many flowers does it have? (it looks like it has 4-5 peduncles, yes/no?)


proceeding to promote & preserve my Viola aduncu. :thumbs_up

of the 3 other Oxalis species you mentioned as possibilities:

O. stricta has pointy petals; my Oxalis has roundy petals.

O. dillenii is not in my area apparently.

O. corniculata has a creeping habit; my Oxalis is upright.

when open, the flower petals measure 3/8" from base to tip. hard to say how many flowers total, but it looks like they only have 3 open at a time. the plants have a mix of buds, blooms, & seed capsules. :cap:
i'm still leaning to my original id, but then who doesn't want a legit opportunity to say suksdorfii! :clue:

Edit PS: no leaf stipules & 2 flowers per peduncle.

i was off making a video of the Oxalis, yes i ate a leaf, as i saw some bees visiting whilst chewing. :doh: i have some nice action shots of 3 visits and at least 2 species of bees. will put that video over in the bugs & butterflies when it is finished processing. :hihi:

#25 freeztar

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 03:38 PM

Sweet! So we can say Suksdorfii! :thumbs_up

Oxalis is one of my favorite "weeds". It grows nearly everywhere and is a good source of vitamin C. I have used them in wild salad mixes with much delight from the surprised, and skeptical, partakers. While they are tasty and nutritious, they can be deadly if ingested in high enough quantities. Apparently, oxalic acid inhibits the uptake of calcium. Of course, it's highly unlikely anyone would eat enough for that to become lethal.

In the human body, ingested oxalic acid is not (so far as is known today) a useful nutrient; so, like all such unneeded components of diet, it is processed by the body to a convenient form and that byproduct is then excreted--in this case, in the urine. In the course of being processed by the body, oxalic acid combines with other substances to form various salts, called oxalates; usually, those salts are in solution (like salt in salt water or sugar in coffee), but if their concentration is high enough some may precipitate out in crystalline form. Such tiny crystals of these salts can be irritating to human tissue, especially to the stomach, the kidneys, and the bladder. It is commonly believed that oxalates contribute to the formation of kidney and bladder stones; one common nutrient with which oxalic acid combines is calcium, making the salt calcium oxalate, and calcium oxalate is found in kidney stones.
...
Some have argued that by readily combining with calcium, oxalic acid in the diet reduces one's effective intake of dietary calcium. That is true, but the size of the effect is, for anyone getting decent nourishment, not meaningful. Even the conservative RDA for calcium is a gram or so (1000 mg) a day, and many believe that 1.5 to 2 g a day is better. (As one source put it: "While research studies confirm the ability of phytic acid and oxalic acid in foods to lower availability of calcium, the decrease in available calcium is relatively small.")

Oxalic Acid and Foods

#26 Cedars

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 04:44 PM

if i seem a little competitive at times, it's because i'm a little competitive...at times. :thumbs_up

I love having someone to share these things with. Someone who appreciates the hunt, the discovery, and the exploration for more. Its not a competition, its an exchange of knowledge and ideas. Not only do we rush home to the grand halls of hypo, we search for links to back up our claims and we share information gathered to increase each others knowledgebase.

So anyways, I dont feel its a competition. I submit things to various data gathering sites on the net to increase their data. When I post these things at hypography, I consider it an extension of that data sharing.

btw, there is no sacrifice when I am chasing butterflies or photographing flowers. It is a reward to self. And am I getting a pretty decent tan again this year!

Hey, whens the next hunt for sasquatch? Speaking of motivational ideas :hihi:

#27 Turtle

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Posted 18 July 2009 - 10:51 AM

Hey, whens the next hunt for sasquatch? Speaking of motivational ideas ;)


possibly august, though Squatchy is going to play second fiddle to my effort to document some rare tailed frogs i saw in a mountain stream over 10 years ago. ;)

took a short walk yesterday to find some flowers to pick & picture. didn't find the natives i was after, any natives, but there is no shortage of invaders here so that is what i got. still have some poking to do to nail this species of Nightshade. :confused:


nightshade -Solanum
possible species: S. americanum, American Nightshade
Solanum physalifolium, Hoe Nightshade
S. nigrum, European Black Nightshade

Edit: because the berries on my example have remained green, and because the photo of the S. physalifolium at the washington burke site looks just like my photo, i am satisfied that this is Solanum physalifolium.
http://biology.burke...xon.php?ID=4430

hoe nightshade is listed as introduced from s. america, but no mention of the how's, when's, and wherefore's of that introduction. a tantalizing hint that it was way back is an ethnobotanical entry i found indicating uses by sw native americans. ;) >> results of search

additional descriptive material: >> PLANTS Profile for Solanum physalifolium (hoe nightshade) | USDA PLANTS


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#28 Turtle

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Posted 18 July 2009 - 12:48 PM

poking around my yard this morning, i ran across Oxalis stricta. :clue: :shrug:

http://biology.burke...xon.php?ID=2823

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#29 Turtle

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Posted 18 July 2009 - 06:51 PM

poking around the kids' yard today, i noticed a 3rd Oxalis. :clue: looks like it's another native. :bounce: :shrug: they didn't want it where it came up volunteer, a bare cobble boundary, so i shot a couple photos then dug it up. :cap: it's currently in intensive car in a pot in my windowsill. :Nurse: i see we have many more Sorels here than my little Washington Wildflower guide lets on. :clue: anyway, i have the plant on hand if there is any quibble with my identification of Trillium-leaf Wood Sorrel -Oxalis trilliifolia

http://biology.burke...xon.php?ID=2825

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Edit: PS i have looked high & low, and no source actually describes this species. that is to say describes Oxalis trilliifolia, if that is what i have found. i observed on my plant that each leaf and flower has a solitary stem that comes from a central mass where the stems are all nearly white. there is only a single peduncle on my specimen & it is bearing 5 flowers. the petals measure 1/4" and the green sepals have a reddish-brown tip. the stems all lay down in a tangly mat. uhm...i think i counted 5 stamens; tough to be sure for my old eye even with a glass. :clue: that 's a wrap. :turtle:

#30 Turtle

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Posted 19 July 2009 - 05:26 PM

went to lechtenberg forest today and i have lots to process still. this first little native gem however was growing in the field next to the parking lot across the road from the park. :partycheers:

PLANTS Profile for Brodiaea coronaria ssp. coronaria (crown brodiaea) | USDA PLANTS

http://biology.burke...xon.php?ID=2450

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#31 Turtle

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Posted 20 July 2009 - 02:33 PM

this native species is growing abundantly as medium to large bushes to 8 feet tall, along the southern field/forest boundary of lechtenberg park. :weather_storm: the sprig in the photo i brought home for the shot & as i read they can be progated from cuttings i'm going to give it the rootone® treatment & see how it goes. :sherlock:


Plant profiles: PLANTS Profile for Spiraea douglasii (rose spirea) | USDA PLANTS
http://biology.burke...xon.php?ID=4031

Ethnobotany link: results of search

rose spirea -Spiraea douglasii Hook.
july 19, 2009
lechtenberg park
clark county washington - native


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#32 Turtle

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Posted 20 July 2009 - 05:31 PM

i noticed this interesting little gem yesterday just inside lechtenberg park and many plants covered a large portion of the ground in an old clearing of the mixed forest. each petal is a bare 1mm long. :eek_big: i only just before posting realized that some of the flowers have 3 petals and some 4 petals. :Alien: :clue: no wonder i couldn't settle on an id all morning looking for white 4-petaled flowers!!! :sherlock: notice in my photo, the top-right-most flower has only 3 petals: :photos: unlike many other cleavers, another common name for bedstraws, threepetal bedstraw has smooth rather than burred/hooked fruits. :weather_storm:

PLANTS Profile for Galium trifidum (threepetal bedstraw) | USDA PLANTS
http://biology.burke...xon.php?ID=4062

threepetal bedstraw -Galium trifidum
july 2009
lechetenberg park
clark county washington - native


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Fruit:
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#33 Turtle

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 09:48 PM

these wildflower seeds are so tiny, and my eyesight so poor, that i entirely missed this wild pattern on the seeds of suksdorfii until i enlarged a photo of them. fascinating! :hihi:

western yellow wood sorrel - Oxalis suksdorfii seeds
july 2009
suburbia
clark county washinton - native - state ranked sensitive

minor scale divisions 1/32"


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#34 freeztar

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Posted 24 July 2009 - 01:53 AM

You do realize that most of your pics would make excellent ID 'tools', right?

Awesome photo! And just for sheets and niggles I'll say, suksdorfii! :hyper:

It never gets old. :hihi: :hihi: