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Biology Books


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#1 nWorld

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Posted 28 December 2004 - 08:54 PM

Hello. As of late I have became very interested in the human body and the life sciences in general (due to discussions with proponents of pseudoscience). I have not taken a biology class since grade 10, and I am now in second year university in economics. Basically what I'm asking is what are some good books that teach the basics of human biology, and cover a wide range of the subject. Also, is Origin of Species a worthwhile read? Any help is greatly appreciated.

#2 Tormod

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Posted 28 December 2004 - 09:28 PM

Hello. As of late I have became very interested in the human body and the life sciences in general (due to discussions with proponents of pseudoscience). I have not taken a biology class since grade 10, and I am now in second year university in economics. Basically what I'm asking is what are some good books that teach the basics of human biology, and cover a wide range of the subject. Also, is Origin of Species a worthwhile read? Any help is greatly appreciated.


Welcome nWorld! Good to have you onboard!

I'd say Origin of Species is a must-read for anyone looking into biology.

But as for specific biology books - I assume you want some popular science books? - I am not too familiar with that genre. MAybe you could be more specific? Are you looking for evolution, medicine, ecology?

#3 nWorld

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Posted 28 December 2004 - 09:34 PM

Welcome nWorld! Good to have you onboard!

I'd say Origin of Species is a must-read for anyone looking into biology.

But as for specific biology books - I assume you want some popular science books? - I am not too familiar with that genre. MAybe you could be more specific? Are you looking for evolution, medicine, ecology?



Thanks.

Not necessarilly popular science books, but just books that outline the science and go into considerable detail. Pretty much my goal is to learn biology as if I were in the classroom, but without paying the $5000. I'm interested in human biology, which would include genetics, evolution, medicine, even psychology. Ecology is not what I'm looking for. Thanks.

#4 TeleMad

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Posted 06 February 2005 - 12:30 AM

Hello. As of late I have became very interested in the human body and the life sciences in general (due to discussions with proponents of pseudoscience). I have not taken a biology class since grade 10, and I am now in second year university in economics. Basically what I'm asking is what are some good books that teach the basics of human biology, and cover a wide range of the subject.


I'll offer again the way I prefer to do it myself ... video lecture series! Here are a few on biology that I've bought:

Human Anatomy & Physiology
http://www.teach12.c... and Physiology

General Biology
http://www.teach12.c...Science of Life

And one on evolution that I don't have:
http://www.teach12.c... of Controversy

And you later mentioned psychology: I have the following video lecture series:
http://www.teach12.c...s of Psychology

If you see one you are interested in but it's not listed as being on sale - and it's price is like $300 or $500 - keep checking back at the web site. For example, the one on psychology is currently listed at $519 - it's not on sale - but it was just on sale before Christmas for around $100.



Also, is Origin of Species a worthwhile read?


In my opinion, no. It is far too longwinded. To make a single point, Darwin goes on for page after page after page: the book is quite boring. It could probably be condensed to 25 pages without losing much. Unless you need to see what Darwin himself said - such as to counter something an opponent claims - you might want to invest your time on some other book on evolution.

#5 Fishteacher73

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Posted 07 February 2005 - 11:40 AM

Bill Bryson's A Short History of Nearly Everything is not a bad overview of the state of most sciences today.

Just about anything by Gould is not a bad option (predominantly evolutionary theory, but a decent amount of biology as well. Pretty easy read as well.)