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Did The Pentagon Weaponize Ticks With Lyme Disease? Congress Wants To Know


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#1 Thoth101

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Posted 16 February 2020 - 03:24 AM

I would not be surprised and I did suspect this for a long time.

 

Did the Pentagon weaponize ticks with Lyme disease? Congress wants to know

https://www.ancient-...-wants-to-know/

 

The House is quietly pressuring the Pentagon’s inspector general to tell Congress whether the agency experimented with weaponizing ticks by infecting them with Lyme disease. House members also want to know whether they were released on unsuspecting members of the public — accidentally or otherwise.

 

An amendment introduced by Rep. Chris Smith (R-N.J.), was passed last week by voice vote during a House debate on the fiscal 2020 defense authorization bill, which passed the next day. The measure specifically requires the IG to examine “whether the Department of Defense experimented with ticks and other insects regarding its use as a biological weapon between the years of 1950 and 1975, CBS News reports.

 



#2 Flummoxed

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Posted 16 February 2020 - 05:18 AM

I would not be surprised and I did suspect this for a long time.

 

Did the Pentagon weaponize ticks with Lyme disease? Congress wants to know

https://www.ancient-...-wants-to-know/

 

The House is quietly pressuring the Pentagon’s inspector general to tell Congress whether the agency experimented with weaponizing ticks by infecting them with Lyme disease. House members also want to know whether they were released on unsuspecting members of the public — accidentally or otherwise.

 

An amendment introduced by Rep. Chris Smith (R-N.J.), was passed last week by voice vote during a House debate on the fiscal 2020 defense authorization bill, which passed the next day. The measure specifically requires the IG to examine “whether the Department of Defense experimented with ticks and other insects regarding its use as a biological weapon between the years of 1950 and 1975, CBS News reports.

 

It was described in germany 130 years ago. https://www.bayareal...y-lyme-disease/ It is now the fastest growing vector born disease in the states. 

 

It seems any animal carrying ticks could also be spreading the disease. https://www.aberdeen...mes_disease.pdf


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#3 Thoth101

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Posted 16 February 2020 - 05:45 AM

It was described in germany 130 years ago. https://www.bayareal...y-lyme-disease/ It is now the fastest growing vector born disease in the states. 

 

It seems any animal carrying ticks could also be spreading the disease. https://www.aberdeen...mes_disease.pdf

 

Yes. My parents live in Pennsylvania and even most of the animals have it. Their dog died from it. There is also a lot of mountains in PA and woods so the ticks thrive. My dad also had gotten it also but they know how to make colloidal silver and that seems to clear it up for humans. But my mom didn't want to try it on the dog.

 

I think it is worst on the east coast because the bio labs were Fort Detrick, Maryland, and Plum Island, New York. PA is right in between the two.



#4 Dubbelosix

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Posted 16 February 2020 - 11:44 AM

I highly doubt it.

#5 VictorMedvil

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Posted 16 February 2020 - 08:14 PM

It wouldn't surprise me if they did until Nixon ended the U.S. Biological weapons program many diseases were being researched as potential biological weapons.

 

"The United States biological weapons program officially began in spring 1943 on orders from U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt. Research continued following World War II as the U.S. built up a large stockpile of biological agents and weapons. Over the course of its 27-year history, the program weaponized and stockpiled the following seven bio-agents (and pursued basic research on many more):

Throughout its history, the U.S. bioweapons program was secret. It was later revealed that laboratory and field testing (some of the latter using simulants on non-consenting individuals) had been common. The official policy of the United States was first to deter the use of bio-weapons against U.S. forces and secondarily to retaliate if deterrence failed.

In 1969, President Richard Nixon ended all offensive (i.e., non-defensive) aspects of the U.S. bio-weapons program. In 1975 the U.S. ratified both the 1925 Geneva Protocol and the 1972 Biological Weapons Convention (BWC)—international treaties outlawing biological warfare. Recent U.S. biodefense programs, however, have raised concerns that the U.S. may be pursuing research that is outlawed by The United States. Initial interest in any form of biological warfare came at the close of World War I. The only agent the U.S. tested was the toxin ricin, a product of the castor plant.[1] The U.S. conducted tests concerning two methods of ricin dissemination: the first, which involved adhering the toxin to shrapnel for delivery by artillery shell, was successful;[1] the second, delivering an aerosol cloud of ricin, was proven less successful in these tests.[1] Neither delivery method was perfected before the war in Europe ended.[1] "

 

"When the U.S. biological warfare program ended in 1969 it had developed six mass-produced, battle-ready biological weapons in the form of agents that cause anthraxtularemiabrucellosisQ-feverVEE, and botulism.[13] In addition staphylococcal enterotoxin B was produced as an incapacitating agent.[13] In addition to the agents that were ready to be used, the U.S. program conducted research into the weaponization of more than 20 other agents. They included: smallpoxEEE and WEEAHFHantavirusBHFLassa feverglanders,[36] melioidosis,[36] plagueyellow feverpsittacosistyphusdengue feverRift Valley fever (RVF), CHIKVlate blight of potatorinderpestNewcastle diseasebird flu, and the toxin ricin.[37]"

 

"Work on delivery systems for the U.S. bioweapons arsenal led to the first mass-produced biological weapon in 1952, the M33 cluster bomb.[39] The M33's sub-munition, the pipe-bomb-like cylindrical M114 bomb, was also completed and battle-ready by 1952.[1][39] Other delivery systems researched and at least partially developed during the 1950s included the E77 balloon bomb and the E86 cluster bomb.[14] The peak of U.S. biological weapons delivery system development came during the 1960s.[1] Production of cluster bomb submunitions began to shift from cylindrical to spherical bomblets, which had a larger coverage area.[40] Development of the spherical E120 bomblet took place in the early 1960s[41] as did development of the M143 bomblet, similar to the chemical M139 bomblet.[1] The experimental Flettner rotor bomblet was also developed during this time period.[42] The Flettner rotor was called, "probably one of the better devices for disseminating microorganisms", by William C. Patrick III.[43]"

 

 

I think it was a mistake that Richard Nixon ended the program on offensive biological weapons however that is what happened. It is amazing the progress they made on natural diseases and delivery however those diseases were much weaker than, what the synthetic biological weapons of the 2010s and 2020s would be like using synthetic biology. They are outdated as the program had stopped. The natural biological agents are weaker than the atomic bomb however modern synthetic agents would not be. High Yield genetic agents in modern warfare would have the ability to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecophagy the planet if released being highly virulent synthetic biological machines.

 

"Perhaps the earliest-recognized and best-known danger of molecular nanotechnology is the risk that self-replicating nanorobots capable of functioning autonomously in the natural environment could quickly convert that natural environment (e.g., "biomass") into replicas of themselves (e.g., "nanomass") on a global basis, a scenario usually referred to as the "grey goo problem" but perhaps more properly termed "global ecophagy"."


Edited by VictorMedvil, 16 February 2020 - 08:54 PM.

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#6 Thoth101

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Posted 16 February 2020 - 11:25 PM

 

It wouldn't surprise me if they did until Nixon ended the U.S. Biological weapons program many diseases were being researched as potential biological weapons.
 
"The United States biological weapons program officially began in spring 1943 on orders from U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt. Research continued following World War II as the U.S. built up a large stockpile of biological agents and weapons. Over the course of its 27-year history, the program weaponized and stockpiled the following seven bio-agents (and pursued basic research on many more):


Throughout its history, the U.S. bioweapons program was secret. It was later revealed that laboratory and field testing (some of the latter using simulants on non-consenting individuals) had been common. The official policy of the United States was first to deter the use of bio-weapons against U.S. forces and secondarily to retaliate if deterrence failed.

In 1969, President Richard Nixon ended all offensive (i.e., non-defensive) aspects of the U.S. bio-weapons program. In 1975 the U.S. ratified both the 1925 Geneva Protocol and the 1972 Biological Weapons Convention (BWC)—international treaties outlawing biological warfare. Recent U.S. biodefense programs, however, have raised concerns that the U.S. may be pursuing research that is outlawed by The United States. Initial interest in any form of biological warfare came at the close of World War I. The only agent the U.S. tested was the toxin ricin, a product of the castor plant.[1] The U.S. conducted tests concerning two methods of ricin dissemination: the first, which involved adhering the toxin to shrapnel for delivery by artillery shell, was successful;[1] the second, delivering an aerosol cloud of ricin, was proven less successful in these tests.[1] Neither delivery method was perfected before the war in Europe ended.[1] "

 

"When the U.S. biological warfare program ended in 1969 it had developed six mass-produced, battle-ready biological weapons in the form of agents that cause anthrax, tularemia, brucellosis, Q-fever, VEE, and botulism.[13] In addition staphylococcal enterotoxin B was produced as an incapacitating agent.[13] In addition to the agents that were ready to be used, the U.S. program conducted research into the weaponization of more than 20 other agents. They included: smallpox, EEE and WEE, AHF, Hantavirus, BHF, Lassa fever, glanders,[36] melioidosis,[36] plague, yellow fever, psittacosis, typhus, dengue fever, Rift Valley fever (RVF), CHIKV, late blight of potato, rinderpest, Newcastle disease, bird flu, and the toxin ricin.[37]"

 

"Work on delivery systems for the U.S. bioweapons arsenal led to the first mass-produced biological weapon in 1952, the M33 cluster bomb.[39] The M33's sub-munition, the pipe-bomb-like cylindrical M114 bomb, was also completed and battle-ready by 1952.[1][39] Other delivery systems researched and at least partially developed during the 1950s included the E77 balloon bomb and the E86 cluster bomb.[14] The peak of U.S. biological weapons delivery system development came during the 1960s.[1] Production of cluster bomb submunitions began to shift from cylindrical to spherical bomblets, which had a larger coverage area.[40] Development of the spherical E120 bomblet took place in the early 1960s[41] as did development of the M143 bomblet, similar to the chemical M139 bomblet.[1] The experimental Flettner rotor bomblet was also developed during this time period.[42] The Flettner rotor was called, "probably one of the better devices for disseminating microorganisms", by William C. Patrick III.[43]"

 

 

I think it was a mistake that Richard Nixon ended the program on offensive biological weapons however that is what happened. It is amazing the progress they made on natural diseases and delivery however those diseases were much weaker than, what the synthetic biological weapons of the 2010s and 2020s would be like using synthetic biology. They are outdated as the program had stopped. The natural biological agents are weaker than the atomic bomb however modern synthetic agents would not be. High Yield genetic agents in modern warfare would have the ability to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecophagy the planet if released being highly virulent synthetic biological machines.

 

"Perhaps the earliest-recognized and best-known danger of molecular nanotechnology is the risk that self-replicating nanorobots capable of functioning autonomously in the natural environment could quickly convert that natural environment (e.g., "biomass") into replicas of themselves (e.g., "nanomass") on a global basis, a scenario usually referred to as the "grey goo problem" but perhaps more properly termed "global ecophagy"."

Thanks for the information! Great findings and research. What I notice also yes they say it was ended with Nixon. But that don't mean it wasn't started back up again under a different name. What really gets me thinking is the nanotechnology that is talked about in your post. I just think of Geoengineering and nanotechnology. Who knows what kind of experiments they are doing with that.

#7 Thoth101

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Posted 16 February 2020 - 11:26 PM

 

I highly doubt it.


Why do you doubt it?