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#1 hazelm

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Posted 28 September 2019 - 07:57 AM

Each description I find for "Chemical Engineering" study and career starts with "Masters Degree".  Is there now - or was there in mid 20th century - a Bachelor Degree in Chemical Engineering?  Just a curiosity question.

 

Also, does the study of Chemical Engineering involve studies of various forms of life and how they interact with each other?

 

I am reading the story of Carl Woese's discovery of a "new" life form while studying methanogens. Not new chronologically but new to Woese and his lab assistants. These methanogens should have been - he thought - bacteria but they weren't. The way he describes them, they sound like viruses but there is no mention of them being viruses - at least not yet.  Rather a scary description and I hope the author is exaggerating about the "horrors"  (my word) that they wreak upon humans and other animals as well as plants. 

 

The reason for my first question is in no way related to the story I am reading.  I had a relative who had a B. S. in Chemical Engineering.  Google roused my curiosity in finding only Masters degrees.  But the two facts have a half-century span between  them.  Chemical Engineering can go in many different directions.  Maybe some start at the bachelor's level?  Maybe a good foundation for medical school?

 

 

The reason for my second question is the book I am reading.  One of Carl Woese's assistants had a degree in Chemical Engineering. 

 

The book:  "The Tangled Tree" by David Quammen".  It is described as "A radical new history of life".  It's goal is to learn what various life forms have in common and how they affect each other.  Yes, I caught the word "radical",  no doubt meaning the author has some new ideas that may or may not prove true.  He finally  got my full attention when he got to the methanogens.  Carl Woese had thought of them as bacteria.  Before he was through he was declaring "but they are not bacteria".  Viruses, maybe?  I must read on.

 

Maybe this should be in the Books section.  If so, how do I move it?  Thanks.



#2 exchemist

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Posted 28 September 2019 - 08:22 AM

Each description I find for "Chemical Engineering" study and career starts with "Masters Degree".  Is there now - or was there in mid 20th century - a Bachelor Degree in Chemical Engineering?  Just a curiosity question.

 

Also, does the study of Chemical Engineering involve studies of various forms of life and how they interact with each other?

 

I am reading the story of Carl Woese's discovery of a "new" life form while studying methanogens. Not new chronologically but new to Woese and his lab assistants. These methanogens should have been - he thought - bacteria but they weren't. The way he describes them, they sound like viruses but there is no mention of them being viruses - at least not yet.  Rather a scary description and I hope the author is exaggerating about the "horrors"  (my word) that they wreak upon humans and other animals as well as plants. 

 

The reason for my first question is in no way related to the story I am reading.  I had a relative who had a B. S. in Chemical Engineering.  Google roused my curiosity in finding only Masters degrees.  But the two facts have a half-century span between  them.  Chemical Engineering can go in many different directions.  Maybe some start at the bachelor's level?  Maybe a good foundation for medical school?

 

 

The reason for my second question is the book I am reading.  One of Carl Woese's assistants had a degree in Chemical Engineering. 

 

The book:  "The Tangled Tree" by David Quammen".  It is described as "A radical new history of life".  It's goal is to learn what various life forms have in common and how they affect each other.  Yes, I caught the word "radical",  no doubt meaning the author has some new ideas that may or may not prove true.  He finally  got my full attention when he got to the methanogens.  Carl Woese had thought of them as bacteria.  Before he was through he was declaring "but they are not bacteria".  Viruses, maybe?  I must read on.

 

Maybe this should be in the Books section.  If so, how do I move it?  Thanks.

This description of the Chem Eng course run at Imperial College may explain. https://www.timeshig...cal-engineering

 

It is a four year course, leading to a M Eng qualification, the point being that to become a chartered engineer you need to get further than can be achieved by a simple 3 yr degree. Just as in medicine a 3yr undergraduate course does not make you a doctor. 



#3 hazelm

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Posted 28 September 2019 - 09:00 AM

This description of the Chem Eng course run at Imperial College may explain. https://www.timeshig...cal-engineering

 

It is a four year course, leading to a M Eng qualification, the point being that to become a chartered engineer you need to get further than can be achieved by a simple 3 yr degree. Just as in medicine a 3yr undergraduate course does not make you a doctor. 

Fascinating.  I did not know there were 3-yr degrees but let that go.  I noticed it did not say you get a  B. S. in chemical engineering at the end of those four years but Keele is in England.  Different setup?  It sounds a bit like the Foundations Courses that Kansas Cit University had.  No matter what your plans were, everyone took the Foundations Courses the first two years.  We were not allowed to start any majors courses until the third year.   So, more general than what Keele is doing.  Keele is specializing.  Ours was more general.  It sound rough, also but such a field of study would be rough.  Keep the student on his/her toes, for sure. 

s

Thank you.