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Auroantibodies And .....


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#1 hazelm

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 11:08 AM

Can anyone explain what this phrase means in K language?

 

<< (a condition in which the patient) had elevated levels of autoantibodies against the adrenergic alpha 1 receptor. 

 

What are the "autoantibodies doing?

 

What is the "adrenergic alpha 1 receptor?

 

Source:  https://neuroscience...iomarker-14888/

 

Thank you.  hazelm


Edited by hazelm, 10 September 2019 - 11:11 AM.


#2 VictorMedvil

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 12:20 PM

Here's your Answer

 

Definition and Function

2009-1-fig03.gif

 

Metabolic Pathway

alpha1-receptors-contraction.png


Edited by VictorMedvil, 10 September 2019 - 12:21 PM.


#3 hazelm

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 01:14 PM

Victor, where ever did you go to Kindergarten?  :-)  Thanks, though.  hazelm



#4 VictorMedvil

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 01:19 PM

Victor, where ever did you go to Kindergarten?  :-)  Thanks, though.  hazelm

 

You would be surprised how useful the stuff they teach you in kindergarten is versus how useless what they teach in high school is. The Universe itself is a picture drawn to mathematical specs.

 

Pdo-Xc-BH4m-VP2-F9n-YSLA63j-650-80.jpg


Edited by VictorMedvil, 10 September 2019 - 01:22 PM.


#5 hazelm

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 01:26 PM

From the tiny bit I understand, I was wondering about that "muscle control.  Does that apply to large muscles such as in the arms or legs - muscles that move the body in some way?  I looked up all the words but the whole still meant nothing.



#6 VictorMedvil

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 01:28 PM

From the tiny bit I understand, I was wondering about that "muscle control.  Does that apply to large muscles such as in the arms or legs - muscles that move the body in some way?  I looked up all the words but the whole still meant nothing.

 

No, there are other receptors for that each part of the body has a different receptor that neurochemicals bind to. There are so many receptor types that I don't think anyone knows them all.


Edited by VictorMedvil, 10 September 2019 - 01:28 PM.


#7 hazelm

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 01:38 PM

No, there are other receptors for that each part of the body has a different receptor that neurochemicals bind to. There are so many receptor types that I don't think anyone knows them all.

And those other receptors are perhaps more under the person's control?  I really am going somewhere with this.  Thanks



#8 GAHD

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Posted 11 September 2019 - 12:53 AM

auto in this case means "self" I think.

It seems to be describing an immune disorder or allergy that's attacking this particular signal pathway. Based on the article, the antibodies glomp onto the receptors that should control the relaxing and contracting of the blood vessels, leading to a "usually loose" or "slow tightening" of the vessels because they just don't get the "time to tighten up" signal properly after the "switches" that are supposed to get the signal are eaten/attacked by their own body. Severe patients probably also had swelling of the legs/hands and moisture retention in the limbs.

Basically; They'd stand up, their blood would drop away from their brain and into their lower body, and the signal to "crush that blood back up into the brain" wouldn't get though fast enough leading them to just pass out from lack of oxygen.

You "can" train yourself to somewhat control the blood flow to your limbs, but it's more a reaction to the way you control your conscious muscles: Tighten your muscles groups and hold it for 5-20 seconds depending on your fitness level one at a time; like like hands, then arms, then shoulders, then upper body, then midriff/lower back, then pelvis area, then butt and thighs then calvs, then toes. Just long enough you "feel" the tightness get uncomfortable. once you relax they will relax more fully than their natural rest-state and (in normal people) your blood pressure will also drop as the vessels also relax to replenish ATP. With practice you can do it pritty much on command without much prep-time at all. Inverse is true where if you consiously tighten your muscle groups a bit you can force blood where you want it. Iron Shirt martial arts techniques, and the g-force techniques of fighter pilots use it too.


Edited by GAHD, 12 September 2019 - 01:15 PM.
added rogan


#9 hazelm

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Posted 11 September 2019 - 08:31 AM

auto in this case means "self" I think.

It seems to be describing an immune disorder or allergy that's attacking this particular signal pathway. Based on the article, the antibodies glomp onto the receptors that should control the relaxing and contracting of the blood vessels, leading to a "usually loose" or "slow tightening" of the vessels because they just don't get the "time to tighten up" signal properly after the "switches" that are supposed to get the signal are eaten/attacked by their own body. Severe patients probably also had swelling of the legs/hands and moisture retention in the limbs.

Basically; They'd stand up, their blood would drop away from their brain and into their lower body, and the signal to "crush that blood back up into the brain" wouldn't get though fast enough leading them to just pass out from lack of oxygen.

You "can" train yourself to somewhat control the blood flow to your limbs, but it's more a reaction to the way you control your conscious muscles: Tighten your muscles groups and hold it for 5-20 seconds depending on your fitness level one at a time; like like hands, then arms, then shoulders, then upper body, then midriff/lower back, then pelvis area, then butt and thighs then calvs, then toes. Just long enough you "feel" the tightness get uncomfortable. once you relax they will relax more fully than their natural rest-state and (in normal people) your blood pressure will also drop as the vessels also relax to replenish ATP. With practice you can do it pritty much on command without much prep-time at all. Inverse is true where if you consiously tighten your muscle groups a bit you can force blood where you want it. Iron Shirt martial arts techniques, and the g-force techniques of fighter pilots use it too.

Thank you, GAHD.  Sounds as if the body doesn't like itself.  So, by tightening and loosening one's own muscles will improve the blood flow upward?  I must go  back and read the article again.  Then read your and Victor's responses.  A lot of new vocabulary here.  That's why I wasn't getting it. 



#10 hazelm

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Posted 12 September 2019 - 07:12 AM

This morning I have four emails from Science Forums, each stating that there is a reply here from "Real Genius".  But, when I click on the link, I come up with my reply to GAHD and nothing more - nothing shows from Real Genius.  Perhaps someone can explain?



#11 GAHD

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Posted 12 September 2019 - 12:43 PM

This morning I have four emails from Science Forums, each stating that there is a reply here from "Real Genius".  But, when I click on the link, I come up with my reply to GAHD and nothing more - nothing shows from Real Genius.  Perhaps someone can explain?

Spammer that was nuked.



#12 hazelm

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Posted 12 September 2019 - 01:01 PM

Spammer that was nuked.

Good.  I was hoping you'd say that. Thank you.