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Transforming Mars


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#1 hazelm

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Posted 16 July 2019 - 05:53 AM

Greg Bear ("Moving Mars") was right.  Making Mars habitable:

 

https://www.scienced...p Science News)

 

I often wonder if researchers get a lot of their ideas from science fiction writers.  They should maybe pay the authors a royalty?  Or, if the science fiction writer turns out to be wrong?    Something to think about? 



#2 GAHD

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Posted 16 July 2019 - 02:03 PM

Since a lot of sci-fi writers are either scientists or closely related to scientists, I think it's more a positive feedback loop situation where they all play off one another. Especially with the way sci-fi conventions work in spreading around "common knowledge" from specialist areas.

I mean, we DO have subs and diving gear now, but it's not the algae tank oxy production Jules pictured. Mars isn't what John Carpenter saw either, but Red/Green/Blue Mars books do give an interesting set of brainstorms particularly with biometrics unrelated to terraforming. Even Clarke-tech and Clarke's three laws in general have some applications to modern life: most people view cellphones and GPS as Clarke-tech even if they don't know the meaning of the term.



#3 hazelm

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Posted 16 July 2019 - 03:14 PM

Since a lot of sci-fi writers are either scientists or closely related to scientists, I think it's more a positive feedback loop situation where they all play off one another. Especially with the way sci-fi conventions work in spreading around "common knowledge" from specialist areas.

I mean, we DO have subs and diving gear now, but it's not the algae tank oxy production Jules pictured. Mars isn't what John Carpenter saw either, but Red/Green/Blue Mars books do give an interesting set of brainstorms particularly with biometrics unrelated to terraforming. Even Clarke-tech and Clarke's three laws in general have some applications to modern life: most people view cellphones and GPS as Clarke-tech even if they don't know the meaning of the term.

All true, of course.  I need to go back and re-read Clarke's books now that I know more than I knew back then.   Just took a glance at Clarke's Laws.  Must read those carefully now.  Thanks.