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Screw Physics

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#18 exchemist

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 05:18 AM

My model is a particle theory of light. You are right that the mesh idea seems to relate to diffraction. Indeed every object at least at the surface is a mesh, which determines its color. Change the mesh dimensions and the object will change its color. One way of changing the dimensions of the mesh is to heat it. This will cause the spacing between each atom to increase; the atoms also vibrate releasing pieces of screw material (light). Since the mesh dimensions are larger owing to heat, the color of the object changes. Sending this light into a prism will indeed yield a different spectrum. When the object cools, its dimensions get back to normal and we see its normal color again. This is how my model accounts for spectroscopy.

If light is particles and not waves, how does the mesh spacing determine the colour (i.e. the proportions of light and dark) in the emitted light?   



#19 exchemist

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 05:20 AM

My model is a particle theory of light. Think of each photon as a bullet from a machine gun. It has a frequency. But a blue photon is more energetic than a red photon because it contains less proportion of dark. It looks blue for the same reason, via Goethe's theory of color.

How can a particle have a frequency?



#20 LightStorm

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 05:36 AM

If light is particles and not waves, how does the mesh spacing determine the colour (i.e. the proportions of light and dark) in the emitted light?   

 

The mesh blocks out (some) light that impinges on it. This blocking (that creates the dark) depends on the mesh dimensions. Thus the color changes when the object's dimensions change.


Edited by LightStorm, 30 April 2019 - 05:38 AM.


#21 LightStorm

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 05:37 AM

How can a particle have a frequency?

 

The emitter emits light at a certain frequency. Just like a machine gun has a frequency of emissions. The emissions are all particles. Why can't a machine gun have a frequency? The bullet per se has no frequency. 


Edited by LightStorm, 30 April 2019 - 05:40 AM.

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#22 exchemist

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 08:21 AM

The emitter emits light at a certain frequency. Just like a machine gun has a frequency of emissions. The emissions are all particles. Why can't a machine gun have a frequency? The bullet per se has no frequency. 

I begin to see: the frequency, in your model, is the rate of emission of these particles. The more emitted per second the higher the frequency. OK. And the energy per particle is given by the amount of light and dark that each one contains, which is determined by the mesh size. Is that it?  


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#23 LightStorm

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 10:13 AM

I begin to see: the frequency, in your model, is the rate of emission of these particles. The more emitted per second the higher the frequency. OK. And the energy per particle is given by the amount of light and dark that each one contains, which is determined by the mesh size. Is that it?  

 

Yes, that's it.





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