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Ionic Fluid Tubing Vs Electrical Wiring In A Tesla

Electricity fluid engineering

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#1 andytak3740

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 02:03 PM

Hello Everyone, 

 

I was hoping that someone could help me with a science question. Is it feasible to use tubes of Ionic Fluid to replace standard metal wiring? If so, would it transfer the electrical? Would this charge be less or more efficient to a normal metal cable and by how much?

 

Knowing all of this, would it be plausible to create a Tesla Coil that is primarily composed of tubing filled with an Ionic Fluid in place of the copper cable/wire? Would it still create a decent voltage, and how would it compare to the original fully metal design?

 

Can't wait to hear everyone thoughts on the matter. 

 

 



#2 exchemist

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 03:23 PM

Hello Everyone, 

 

I was hoping that someone could help me with a science question. Is it feasible to use tubes of Ionic Fluid to replace standard metal wiring? If so, would it transfer the electrical? Would this charge be less or more efficient to a normal metal cable and by how much?

 

Knowing all of this, would it be plausible to create a Tesla Coil that is primarily composed of tubing filled with an Ionic Fluid in place of the copper cable/wire? Would it still create a decent voltage, and how would it compare to the original fully metal design?

 

Can't wait to hear everyone thoughts on the matter. 

It will not be very effective. In the conduction band of a metal you have an effectively unlimited number of charge carriers (electrons) that experience low resistance to motion through it. An ionic solution requires the physical diffusion of relatively large charge carriers (whole atoms rather than electrons)  through a solvent.  For example sea water has a specific conductance about a millionth of that of copper.

 

I'm not saying you could not do it, but the resistive losses would be high. 


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#3 andytak3740

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 03:37 PM

Thanks for your informative reply, I was hoping that it could be a viable experiment to undertake. I thought I could give off a unique result. So it may function poorly, but it still may work? Well, I suppose that would be enough, for me to undergo the project. 

 

Thank you for the help, if I ever get it to work I'll post the results here. 





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