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Switching From Biology To Physics

Universitycareer advice physics career transition biology Switching fields career change nanotechnology universities

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#1 Sayajin123

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Posted 01 February 2019 - 08:41 AM

Hi,

 

I recently completed my Bachelors in Biomedical Science at Monash University with the intention of going into research, specifically cancer research and aging. I liked all the sciences but my passion was originally directed towards mathematics and physics where I used to enjoy reading scientific literature related to these fields from a relatively young age. They were also my strongest subjects in high school with biology and chemistry came in 2nd. However, I ended up taking Biomedical Science because I felt the research would be more geared and relevant in reality than the fields I was truly passionate about. 

 

However, after doing a research project and getting hands-on experience in the arena of clinical research, I realized that I do not have what it takes to conduct clinical research as I found a lot of time going towards tasks that could be done better if automated along with the literature not being exciting to read as i felt it can be a little narrow. Seeing that working in clinical research isn't something I can do in the long run, I wanted to switch gears and pursue my old flame of physics specifically fields that get into nanotechnology. Nanotechnology is a large realm but I have a keen interest to explore quantum mechanical phenomena and try to find ways of incorporating it into real-life applications.

 

I was thinking about doing it in the US but I don't know whether I would have to do a 2nd bachelors or if there was any pre-masters or transitioning program for masters in physics being offered by any universities over there. I wanted to know how feasible it is to do this and whether a better career pathway is available towards nanotechnology. 

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 



#2 VictorMedvil

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Posted 01 February 2019 - 08:54 AM

Hi,

 

I recently completed my Bachelors in Biomedical Science at Monash University with the intention of going into research, specifically cancer research and aging. I liked all the sciences but my passion was originally directed towards mathematics and physics where I used to enjoy reading scientific literature related to these fields from a relatively young age. They were also my strongest subjects in high school with biology and chemistry came in 2nd. However, I ended up taking Biomedical Science because I felt the research would be more geared and relevant in reality than the fields I was truly passionate about. 

 

However, after doing a research project and getting hands-on experience in the arena of clinical research, I realized that I do not have what it takes to conduct clinical research as I found a lot of time going towards tasks that could be done better if automated along with the literature not being exciting to read as i felt it can be a little narrow. Seeing that working in clinical research isn't something I can do in the long run, I wanted to switch gears and pursue my old flame of physics specifically fields that get into nanotechnology. Nanotechnology is a large realm but I have a keen interest to explore quantum mechanical phenomena and try to find ways of incorporating it into real-life applications.

 

I was thinking about doing it in the US but I don't know whether I would have to do a 2nd bachelors or if there was any pre-masters or transitioning program for masters in physics being offered by any universities over there. I wanted to know how feasible it is to do this and whether a better career pathway is available towards nanotechnology. 

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 

Well, for Nanotechnology you could just get a Minor in Nano-science as I did but Biochemistry is the degree for Nanotechnology or an actual degree in Nanotechnology itself. Nanotechnology is generally a self contained major unless you get a minor in it, but originally I went for Biotechnology then changed my Major to Bio-physics then went for Biochemistry, which makes me a Bio-Chemical-Physicist with a Minor in Nano-science and experience in Biotechnology, that is the path I took but I mainly work in Bio-Nanorobotics when dealing with Nanotechnology. So, I dunno depends if you want to work in Inorganic or Organic nanotechnology in my experience, Biotechnology or actual Nanotechnology.


Edited by VictorMedvil, 01 February 2019 - 08:58 AM.


#3 Sayajin123

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Posted 01 February 2019 - 10:05 AM

Do you get to explore quantum phenomena with graphene or carbon nanotubes or is it just working with proteins and other molecules in the body? Is there a lot of mathematics in the work that you do?



#4 VictorMedvil

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Posted 05 February 2019 - 09:27 PM

Do you get to explore quantum phenomena with graphene or carbon nanotubes or is it just working with proteins and other molecules in the body? Is there a lot of mathematics in the work that you do?

 

I work mainly with Organic things made of proteins and DNA/RNA, but also Inorganic as well such as Carbon Nanotubes. There is some Math in the Calculus (I,II,III) area but mainly algebra. The Heavy math lifting is done by computer mainly like Protein folding for instance.


Edited by VictorMedvil, 05 February 2019 - 09:32 PM.




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