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Chemistry Carbon To Silicon.


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#1 VictorMedvil

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Posted 07 October 2018 - 07:56 AM

This post is about something I have been thinking about, what would happen if you bond silicon directly to carbon.

 

image34.gif
 

Fig1Roetski.jpg

 

 

 

The Carbon Anions will bind to which Silicon Anions any ones with a positive charge should bind to the negative charged ones right?



#2 exchemist

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Posted 07 October 2018 - 09:08 AM

This post is about something I have been thinking about, what would happen if you bond silicon directly to carbon.

 

image34.gif
 

Fig1Roetski.jpg

 

 

 

The Carbon Anions will bind to which Silicon Anions any ones with a positive charge should bind to the negative charged ones right?

The Si=C double bond doesn't seem to exist. I'm very rusty on this but I suspect the differing valence orbital sizes, which would weaken the Si=C pi bond compared to C=C, result in a pi bond strength insufficient to overcome the energy needed to promote one of the s electrons to a p orbital, as needed for sp2 hybridisation. So energetically it may not stack up.   

 

You will need to explain what all these numbers mean, as it is not very obvious. The "r" for interatomic distance in Angstroms is OK, but the bond energies look odd to me and I can't work out what the numbers in bold, with + and - in front of them, are supposed to be.  

 

Carbanions and carbocations are highly unstable reaction intermediates. I'm not sure what these diagrams of them are intended to signify.  



#3 VictorMedvil

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 04:23 PM

The Si=C double bond doesn't seem to exist. I'm very rusty on this but I suspect the differing valence orbital sizes, which would weaken the Si=C pi bond compared to C=C, result in a pi bond strength insufficient to overcome the energy needed to promote one of the s electrons to a p orbital, as needed for sp2 hybridisation. So energetically it may not stack up.   

 

You will need to explain what all these numbers mean, as it is not very obvious. The "r" for interatomic distance in Angstroms is OK, but the bond energies look odd to me and I can't work out what the numbers in bold, with + and - in front of them, are supposed to be.  

 

Carbanions and carbocations are highly unstable reaction intermediates. I'm not sure what these diagrams of them are intended to signify.  

 

I do not exactly know but I do know that there are Organosilicon bonds which are carbon and silicon, I was wondering if anyone on this forums knew more about them then I do which is not much other than they do form.



#4 exchemist

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 01:24 AM

I do not exactly know but I do know that there are Organosilicon bonds which are carbon and silicon, I was wondering if anyone on this forums knew more about them then I do which is not much other than they do form.

Sure there is a class of organosilicon compounds. You can start here: https://en.wikipedia...i/Organosilicon

 

But so far as I know they are almost all sigma bonded.

 

My recollection is that one of the key differences between Si and C is that the Si-O bond is a lot stronger than the the Si-H bond, whereas for carbon the bond strengths are similar. This is one reason why in an environment with a lot of oxygen, like that of the Earth, it is carbon that forms the long chains, while silicon is almost all tied up with oxygen, in the rocks. 

 

I don't pretend to be an expert on silicon chemistry, but I do know my way around my books, so if you have specific questions I may be able to find some of the answers. 

 

Thanks for starting a proper chemistry thread by the way. We don't often get them, though Hazel does her bit from time to time.


Edited by exchemist, 09 October 2018 - 05:13 AM.


#5 VictorMedvil

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Posted 04 April 2019 - 12:24 AM

Sure there is a class of organosilicon compounds. You can start here: https://en.wikipedia...i/Organosilicon

 

But so far as I know they are almost all sigma bonded.

 

My recollection is that one of the key differences between Si and C is that the Si-O bond is a lot stronger than the the Si-H bond, whereas for carbon the bond strengths are similar. This is one reason why in an environment with a lot of oxygen, like that of the Earth, it is carbon that forms the long chains, while silicon is almost all tied up with oxygen, in the rocks. 

 

I don't pretend to be an expert on silicon chemistry, but I do know my way around my books, so if you have specific questions I may be able to find some of the answers. 

 

Thanks for starting a proper chemistry thread by the way. We don't often get them, though Hazel does her bit from time to time.

 

I got distracted from this thread, Yes I was wondering what the bond strength would be in a Silicon and Carbon bond along with what process generate them and lastly could they be generated by adding an electron to another material's bond such as with an electron-lithography device.



#6 fahrquad

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Posted 06 April 2019 - 05:25 PM

My chemistry is probably rustier than any of yours, but isn't Carbon combined with Silicon called Silicone Carbide?

 

340px-SiC6Hstructure.jpg

 

https://en.wikipedia...Silicon_carbide



#7 VictorMedvil

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Posted 06 April 2019 - 08:34 PM

My chemistry is probably rustier than any of yours, but isn't Carbon combined with Silicon called Silicone Carbide?

 

340px-SiC6Hstructure.jpg

 

https://en.wikipedia...Silicon_carbide

 

Ya, well I want to make Nano-factories out of Silicon Carbide with an electron lithography device, good it is made through an electrical process. This can be used to be a Semiconductor with the Silane and Carbon Nanotubes for nano-electronics. This material can also be nano-fabricated using a electron beam.

 

Resist-Patterning2.png


Edited by VictorMedvil, 06 April 2019 - 08:41 PM.