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Brain-To-Computer Interface (Full-Dive Vr)

brain-to-computer interface full-dive vr

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#1 beatenpatharchives

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 10:29 PM

Hello all:

 

I am researching the topic listed above. This topic is concerning creating a system that will not only let us see a "seamless" virtual world, but experience the feelings related to what happens in that environment as if our body were actually there. Hence, I want to pose a few questions. If you have a remark regarding the topic please do so by posting on this thread and leaving your ideas and opinions. (Do not merely claim yes, this is possible/no, it isn't possible, please. I want reasons and facts, not excuses.)

 

The first question is about the ethical soundness of such a device. If we could create it, should we humans use it for our own purposes, from fully-immersive gaming to medical research and treatment?If you are sound in the field of ethics, please leave specific reasons you think the way you do and, if possible, any ethical theories so we may fully see and understand your position.

 

The second question is in regards to the largest hurdle researchers face in this specific realm of study, and that is how to connect the brain to said device and use the device to send signals from the computer to the brain, allowing this software to work? This question requires more knowledge in the neurosciences to base answers on. Please be as specific as possible in this question.

 

The third question is in regards to ethics as well. If we developed such a device, would it have a positive or negative effect on humanity as a whole? I say as a whole because with every good thing comes those who are willing to abuse it.  This is not concerning the minority who would treat the technology with carelessness, but to those who use it for its designated purposes with good-natured reasoning behind it.

 

Thank you.

 

 



#2 Panther

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 11:35 PM

Hey beatenpatharchives, 

 

If a Nerve-Gear like device were to exist, I see no problem in using it for both gaming, medical, and research purposes. I doubt that people would be playing much longer than some hardcore gamers do already, and it could be really useful in the medical and research fields (prosthetics, scenarios, etc.).

 

Electroencephalography is something a lot of people are looking at for "reading" the brain. Doesn't have the highest spatial resolution, but there are things you can do to improve it and it is non-invasive. As to from computer to brain, there's a paper on non-invasive deep brain stimulation: http://neurosciencen...asive-dbs-6821/
Granted, there's a ton of work that would need to be done for the above method to be implemented in a device.

Overall, I think it would have a positive effect on the world. It will probably become a hit just as Minecraft, current VR, or other popular games. However, I doubt everyone in the world is going to go for a device like this, it's just not in everyone's taste. That being said, the medical advances and research achieved from this device will most definitely benefit humanity, which is why I am saying overall it will be positive. 

 

If you are interested in joining a group aiming to achieve this goal in a more reasonable approach, feel free to check it out: https://discord.gg/naHdGTu

Thanks.



#3 edude10001

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Posted 16 April 2018 - 02:55 PM

Hello beatenpatharchives,

 

I can't speak to the level of technology required as it would need something that can first process the amount of data that our brains can output, we would need something to be able to build what the brain sees in real time, and then we would need to be able to find a way to add tactile touch and interaction to the mix, which is way beyond me.

 

In terms of ethics. There are many usages in the medical field, and in the research field, if we can clone data of specific ailments. It could be used to train people who are working in various medical specialties, like operating room training without the possibility of messing up on a real person. In terms of research it could also prove to be unique for the purpose of psychological testing. This is ethical because it could lead to the betterment of human kind, it could be negative because every person handles knowledge and power differently. now given the operating room example there is also a thing called muscle memory part of the reason this kind of research could be bad is because we don't know if that muscle memory will be built in a world without muscles. That could make the difference in life or death situations. Also in terms of research we could be doing research on individual brains, and if we can get in the head of a person who's to say we can't manipulate ones mind to behaving/ reacting to things in a very controlled manor. Would your thoughts be your own thoughts in that situation?  I think there will need to be some strict regulations on the types of research that can be done with this type of technology as well as how it should be handled in a general sense.

 

Speaking as a more old school gamer and an outcast (in some cases) the concept of a virtual world escape that would allow me to bend reality to my way of thinking and would allow me to grab a sword and become a knight of sorts would be a lot of fun. I can see many types of addictions arising from being able to escape like that, not that people don't do this now with video games. Ethically I think the same way as I did for the medical restrictions. There will need to be lots of regulations, because as people start to enjoy it they literally could become addicted to the point where they forget about the physiological needs along with the need to procreate. In the long term it could be the downfall of society because humans like to enjoy life, and if life could be what you want, who wouldn't enjoy it?





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