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Small Generator Lighting 7 W Led Bulb 230 V E 27

small generator high voltage generator generator homemade generator simple generator

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#69 exchemist

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Posted 29 May 2017 - 05:07 AM

I think STB is here to pull down his pants and bare his bumcheeks at us.


Seems at any rate he got the bum's rush from this site: https://www.electron...ed-bulb.283486/

And ditto here: http://www.electro-t...rator-3.150560/

Edited by exchemist, 29 May 2017 - 05:08 AM.


#70 mrg

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Posted 29 May 2017 - 06:30 AM

Seems at any rate he got the bum's rush from this site ...

 

Oh dear, STB is running around the internet, setting fires in wastebaskets.



#71 billvon

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 11:51 AM

I think what science toolbar wish to say is: if the magnetic flux generated by the neodymyum sphere can charge the coil,enough to light a bulb this means it can charge unconventional materials....it is simple.

What is an "unconventional material?"



#72 billvon

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 11:52 AM

 

seryously? at that dimensions ? I wish you good luck to light the bulb

I've designed and built inverters that boost the power from a 12V battery to create 120VAC.  Not that hard, and no spinning magnets required.


Edited by billvon, 30 May 2017 - 11:52 AM.


#73 CraigD

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 04:54 PM

I think what science toolbar wish to say is: if the magnetic flux generated by the neodymyum sphere can charge the coil,enough to light a bulb this means it can charge unconventional materials....

But the small generator you’ve built isn’t charging the coil– changing the number or arrangement of charged particles – it’s inducing a current in it. That’s what electric generators fundamentally do – convert mechanical work into electric current.

In science and engineering, it’s important to use terms like “charge” and “current” correctly.

small generator lighting 7 W led bulb 230 V E 27

Cool video, though I think some spoken explanation would improve it. Cool gadget, in any case. :thumbs_up

As others have noted, the output of your direct current motor-driven generator (lacking as it appears to brushes or electronic switches) is likely an alternating current, and if it’s making the commercial LED lamps you’re using glow as brightly as they do when connected to a 230 or 110 Volt AC power supply (it’s hard to judge lamp brightness by eye, even harder watching a video of a lamp on a computer screen), must be producing a similar voltage. The LED lamp has some pretty complicated electronics – in most cases, a miniaturized SMPS – built into it that’s converting its AC input back into DC and, in most cases, lowering the voltage to around 3 V. There are some LED lamps on the market that use high-voltage LEDs to avoid the need for an SMPS, but they’ve proven less efficient – about 70% vs, 90%. (source: Electronics Weekly article “Why not direct AC drive your LED string?”)

You’d get better performance, I think – a brighter light glowing longer before the battery is discharged - connecting your 4 V battery directly to an LED without the 110 AC to low voltage DC. You can get such LED’s from pretty much any LED flashlight, most of which are 4.5 V (from three 1.5 V batteries, eg: AA or AAA).

You could compare the efficiency of your setup to that of an LED flashlight timing how long your setup runs before draining its battery, vs. a flashlight. You could compare the lamp brightness using a photographers light meter, or, if like most people these days, you don’t have one, but have phone, a phone app that uses the phone’s built in camera.

While I’m pretty sure you setup is much less efficient than an LED flashlight’s, it would be interesting to see the results of such a test. It’s certainly much more visible, and fun, than a simple flashlight!

#74 sciencetoolbar

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 12:58 AM

Hello! Craig D.

I apreciate all the kindly advices.

you saw all the movies on our website ? for example, this one?

https://www.youtube....h?v=ltDKFEWnxGo

......or the one with the 75 W bulb 230 V ( those are not led bulbs anymore.....) 

https://www.youtube....h?v=Ud3fMcn7GAw

 

and is not necesarly to use a baterry and an electric Dc motor, for example I can use an engine which is running on fuel ......, but my interest is that to transform  the magnetic flux  in energy (the small generator is an example) not to create an industrial generator......

thx st


Edited by sciencetoolbar, 31 May 2017 - 04:33 AM.


#75 sciencetoolbar

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 01:17 AM

I will need a kindly opinion from you. In your opinion,  the magnetic flux generated by a spinning neodymium sphere 26 mm diameter, 

Material NdFeB Shape Sphere Diameter 26 mm Tolerance +/- 0,1 mm Coating Chrome-plated (Ni-Cu-Ni-Cr) Magnetisation N38 strength approx. 10 kg Max. working temperature 80°C Weight 70 g

the rotation system for the spining sphere : 5 V dc motor, input 5,1 V external battery, 4000 mAh ,

it is dangerous for the human body ? ( we don.t wish to modify the electric cell processes -  human body)

 

thx ST


Edited by sciencetoolbar, 31 May 2017 - 03:23 AM.


#76 billvon

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 02:12 PM

,

it is dangerous for the human body ? ( we don.t wish to modify the electric cell processes -  human body)

 

thx ST

Is it dangerous in what way?

With the numbers you are using, it will not exceed SAR or ICNIRP levels.  The output voltage may present a shock hazard, but probably not.