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Fdvr Headset Ideas/dangers

FDVR Virtual Reality Sword Art Online

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#1 BlackFlameAssassin13

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 07:59 PM

     I would like to say, that yes, while there are many dangers, and I do believe that the device should NEVER come into direct contact with the brain, in case of a malfunction, people do not realize how immensely big this technology could impact the way we live. We could work, just by lying down on our beds. And with Li-Fi (Wi-Fi, just with light), this could be accomplished with a few modifications. I did a little research, and with the right technology, we could use light to transfer the data from the device to the brain, of course we would have to avoid damaging the rest of the head, including the skin, muscle, skull, etc. I've attached my own personal thoughts on how a FDVR headset should be designed, but, of course, they are definitely not official.

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#2 BlackFlameAssassin13

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 08:37 PM

     Hello, my friends. This post is about the dangers of FDVR, (Full Dive Virtual Reality), and the ways we could potentially solve them.

 

     When I was first personally introduced to FDVR, it was when I was watching the anime Sword Art Online. Although having a real life NerveGear (The FDVR headset used in the anime) would be awesome, if it were designed the same way, I would automatically sue the designers. Why? Well, for starters, it has direct access to the brain. Do we really want an electrical piece of equipment touching our brain in any way? I think not. A way to get around this would be to use light

 

     For those not familiar to what I am referencing, I'm talking about Li-Fi, or rather, Wi-Fi, but instead of radio frequency, it uses light. Harness this correctly, and we have ourselves FDVR.e But, of course, this proves some difficulty. For starters, after just five minutes of research, I found that the light could not travel through walls. Problem. We would need the light to go through the skin, muscle, skull, and everything in between. Currently, I've seen most designers using brain chips. Big no no. Brain chips are especially dangerous, in the fact that they have direct contact with the brain. I don't know about you, but nothing is touching my brain. Not to mention the cost of the implantation surgery, plus the cost of the piece itself. Below, I've whipped up a report on this topic. I want your opinions, how plausible do you think they are? Is there anything I missed? Let me know.

 

    "FDVR (Full Dive Virtual Reality) Headset/Device Design Notes

. As of Friday, January 13, 2017, the closest thing to a FDVR Headset requires a brain implant chip, allowing the device to connect to the user's brain. This being said, the only current purposes it could effectively serve are medical treatment and/or therapy, and possibly military and police training scenarios. The main problem being, as stated before, is that it requires a brain implant chip, meaning that it is not only expensive, but highly impractical and dangerous, even with the chip being the size of a grain of rice. This in itself proves some dificulty, especially being that the implantation process, whether it be surgery or otherwise, can always provide unwanted results. Also, the chip itself is very dangerous, due to the fact that if it shorts out, there is a chance of brain damage. This being said, it is a safe belief to imply that the device should never come into direct contact with the brain, unless medical purposes require and call upon brain chip implantation. It is understood that a new chip the size of a grain of rice was developed to have the ability to dissovle, but it is beleived that it could malfunction and cause damage to the brain, not to mention that if the chip were to not dissovle completly, the remanants could have a potential affect on the brain.
. On the contrary to the things listed above, there are several plausible ways for these problems to be solved. One would be to install a projector in the device and have it project lasers, or, in a more detailed manner, light that is carrying data or information, along with the ability to pass through irrevelavant objects, in this case being the skin, muscle, and skull. There are two immediate complications with this theory, the most obvious being getting the light to transfer data. Should we be working with a computer, it would be a much simpler task, as all that would be required is to program the computer to sense the light patterns, and have the computer translate the light patterns into instructions. The second problem that is presented is that the light does have the chance of frying the brain if not used correctly, as light generates heat in most cases."


#3 BrainJackers

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 10:14 PM

@BFA13
I believe we are talking about future implementations.

To address your thoughts anyways, BCIs can also serve for research. I doubt they could serve for military training at their current level as each soldier would need their own and the chips are limited/expensive.

I agree with dangerous and expensive, but not impractical. These chips are generally given to people already getting brain surgery, or people who have little to live for in their physical body (already paralyzed).

Your projector idea sounds like infrared stimulation. A laser is shot at neurons to heat them up. The neurons release the heat as energy as to not get fried.

It's very hard to fry a brain though. I'm not saying go touch outlets. I am saying due to the resistance of the skin, muscles, and bones, little electricity is going to the brain. It already runs off of miniture amounts per neuron yet humans have bunches of neurons.

My final comment is about light causing heat: both light and heat are energy. Just different types. As light is blocked to create color, it has to go somewhere. You may already know this. Just stating ;)

--@Kayaba

#4 BrainJackers

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 10:26 PM

While we will undergo the same type of paralysis found in sleep, we will not be sleeping due to the reduced mental activity associated with sleep, in my opinion.

I feel skills could carry over if the VR world used proper physics and used the same muscular properties present in your tangible body. The wouldn't while lucid dreaming due to the lack of those two qualities. Even if you think you have them in a dream, you most likely don't. With a computer, it's hard to copy the state of your muscles, but I would assume it to be easier than dreaming the properties into memory.

Compared to current computer usage, I don't think such a device will be a bigger health risk, as long as you need to get up for real world food.

BFA13: why did you revive such an old post and upload the same thing twice? I'm not a mod, I'm not complaining. I'm just curious as to what your thought process was. I did comment on your ideas in the other place you said them.

 

--@Kayaba


Edited by BrainJackers, 19 January 2017 - 10:32 PM.


#5 CraigD

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 08:31 AM

Welcome to hypography, BlackFlameAssassin! :) Please feel free to start a topic in the introductions forum to tell us something about yourself.
 

Do we really want an electrical piece of equipment touching our brain in any way? I think not. A way to get around this would be to use light.

You appear to me to be describing something very close to present day neuroscientific technique known as optogenetics. I think we’ve summarized optogenetics better than the linked Wikipedia article in posts such as this one. Optogenetics have been described, in articles like this, as one of the greatest breakthrough in neuroscience.

The main advantage of optogentic techniques over using electrodes to detect and invoke brain activity is that the light used in optogenetics can be quickly and easily repositioned. Its main disadvantages are that it requires that a hole be cut in the skull (and usually covered with a transparent window), and the nerve cells involved genetically altered, a process that takes weeks.

Without the “genetics” part of optogenetics, only a few kinds of nerve cells, such as the light-receptive ones in our eyes, can be affected with light, and only ones that naturally emit light, such as those in some jellyfish, can have their activity detected. Most nerve cells, without the insertion of the genes to produce light absorbing and emitting proteins, are insensitive to, and don’t emit, light.

Given the choice of an electrode (which currently can be microscopic, and, I hope, may someday be nanoscopic, as I describe here) touching our brain, and genetically altering my nerve cells to make them interact via through holes in our skull, I think we’d chose electrodes

#6 CraigD

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 04:37 PM

BFA13: why did you revive such an old post and upload the same thing twice? I'm not a mod, I'm not complaining. I'm just curious as to what your thought process was. I did comment on your ideas in the other place you said them.

Moderation note: to get them organized in a single place, I moved several posts about BFA13’s “never come in direct contact with the brain/Li-Fi” idea into this thread. We discourage “crossposting” the same idea in many threads here at hypography, so let’s keep this conversation in this thread. :)

#7 BrainJackers

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 09:25 PM

@CraigD: Sir, yes, sir. In most places I frequent, the mods don't reorganize topics. Sorry about my crosspost.

 

I feel if going for a commercially viable product (which I feel is a good guideline for end products (not referring to a commercial product, just a result of a process)), gene editing is definitely a don't do. I also don't feel humans would like replacing large sections of the cranium with transparent windows. That would likely also make heads a lot more damageable, and make people who went through the procedure a bit paranoid of where they put their heads.

 

I do not believe you need your entire cranium replaced, of course. Using a close up projector, you could use a small window to cover a lot of area. You likely have to cover your optic nerves (sight) (also could be the occipital lobe but I feel it would be better to use the optic nerves as they would be easier to 'render' for), olfactory bulb (smell), auditory cortex (sound), gustatory cortex (taste), and the thalamus/parietal lobe (the thalamus is the better choice yet also in the center of the brain. It also regulates consciousness which could be dangerous to mess with). As these are spread out around the brain, that is more mirrors to install.

 

--@Kayaba





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