Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

European Genetic Markers


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Deepwater6

Deepwater6

    Explaining

  • Members
  • 680 posts

Posted 23 April 2013 - 06:20 PM

http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-22252099

I find it hard to believe that migration alone changed the markers. The article doesn't really delve into what the new genetic markers changed about the people of that time period. Such as the first time red hair started to appear on their heads, skin color or eye color changes etc.

It just seems an awful abrupt switch for a change such as this. If it was a climate driven change I find it strange that the old markers were, as the article says, "erased"???

Edited by Deepwater6, 23 April 2013 - 06:22 PM.


#2 Turtle

Turtle

    Member

  • Members
  • 15052 posts

Posted 23 April 2013 - 11:16 PM

http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-22252099

I find it hard to believe that migration alone changed the markers. The article doesn't really delve into what the new genetic markers changed about the people of that time period. Such as the first time red hair started to appear on their heads, skin color or eye color changes etc.

It just seems an awful abrupt switch for a change such as this. If it was a climate driven change I find it strange that the old markers were, as the article says, "erased"???


:read: Seems to me from my reading that the newer population replaced the older, so either the older population [mostly] left or died off and so weren't around to leave their marker. I saw nothing to suggest climate change in the article; how did you come by that?

I don't know if the haplogroup H marker is tied to any specific genetic expressions or not. :shrug:

#3 Deepwater6

Deepwater6

    Explaining

  • Members
  • 680 posts

Posted 24 April 2013 - 08:36 AM

Hey Turtle, Great to hear from you again. Your right the article didn't really get into climate change, that was just me typing out loud as to a reason for the switch.

Are you saying it was a totally different group with these markers? I kind of got (from the article) that it was a group who's numbers went low and then they were inter-breeded with another (new) smaller group. That mixture then created the new markers.

#4 Turtle

Turtle

    Member

  • Members
  • 15052 posts

Posted 24 April 2013 - 12:45 PM

[quote name='Deepwater6' timestamp='1366814213' post='327630']
Hey Turtle, Great to hear from you again. Your right the article didn't really get into climate change, that was just me typing out loud as to a reason for the switch.

Are you saying it was a totally different group with these markers? I kind of got (from the article) that it was a group who's numbers went low and then they were inter-breeded with another (new) smaller group. That mixture then created the new markers.
[/quote]


Hey Deep. :wave2: I have been talking to you all along; were you gone? ;)


Yes; I get that the markers are from totally different groups. That's why they are markers.

[quotename='BBC article']... Decades of study of the DNA patterns of modern Europeans suggests two major events in prehistory significantly affected the continent's genetic landscape: its initial peopling by hunter-gatherers in Palaeolithic times (35,000 years ago) and a wave of migration by Near Eastern farmers some 6,000 years ago. (in the early Neolithic).
...

In the study, an international team of researchers focused on mitochondrial
DNA (mtDNA), the information in the cell's "batteries". This type of DNA is
passed down, almost unchanged, from a mother to her children.By studying the mutations, or changes, in mtDNA sequences, researchers are able to probe the maternal histories of different human populations. It has enabled them to build a "family tree" of maternal ancestry, and group different mtDNA lineages together based on shared mutations.

...[/quote]

#5 Deepwater6

Deepwater6

    Explaining

  • Members
  • 680 posts

Posted 24 April 2013 - 04:17 PM

Yeah, I forget to check the threads and the messages often. You have probably been communicating and I just missed it. After I went over 45 my memory went south. I mean, like frustratingly so. :angry:

For example this week I have lost my Hummingbird necture feed, my suet bird food cage, The keys to one of my tractors (which is blocking the driveway), and my wallet (with my drivers license in it). The Mrs. thinks I have early onset of something and she is probably correct. However the only thing I dislike more than spending the afternoon with PA-DMV to apply for a new drivers license is the doctors office and hospitals.

I tried fish oil for awhile, but I didn't see much improvement if any. Or maybe I did and I just can't remember that either. :P

The memory loss excuse does serve me well when it comes to forgetting items on the honey-do list or anniversaries though. ;)

#6 Turtle

Turtle

    Member

  • Members
  • 15052 posts

Posted 24 April 2013 - 04:56 PM

Yeah, I forget to check the threads and the messages often. You have probably been communicating and I just missed it. After I went over 45 my memory went south. I mean, like frustratingly so. :angry:

For example this week I have lost my Hummingbird necture feed, my suet bird food cage, The keys to one of my tractors (which is blocking the driveway), and my wallet (with my drivers license in it). The Mrs. thinks I have early onset of something and she is probably correct. However the only thing I dislike more than spending the afternoon with PA-DMV to apply for a new drivers license is the doctors office and hospitals.

I tried fish oil for awhile, but I didn't see much improvement if any. Or maybe I did and I just can't remember that either. :P

The memory loss excuse does serve me well when it comes to forgetting items on the honey-do list or anniversaries though. ;)


:ideamaybenot: :lol: No worries. I'm trying desperately to remember 45. Maybe it's my european haploids? Or the asian ones? I think it's good enough we know we have forgotten some things. For me, they come to mind later when I least expect it or I look it up or try and back-track from the last good memory spot. If that all fails I blow it off as unimportant until otherwise notified. (My wives have all passed so I'm my own honey.)

PS check your pant cuffs for that key. :sherlock:

Back on topic, I think you would find similar results to the article's but on a smaller scale if you started digging up pioneer graves in say Harlem. The influx of new immigrants to the area replaced the last and the bones reflect that. :hal_skeleton: The article below does not reflect the even earlier Native American population(s), whose bones may or may not be in great evidence due to burial practices or development. :rip:


Harlem @wiki

Harlem is a large neighborhood within the northern section of the New York City borough of Manhattan. Since the 1920s, Harlem has been known as a major African-American residential, cultural and business center. Originally a Dutch village, formally organized in 1658,[5] it is named after the city of Haarlem in the Netherlands



#7 Deepwater6

Deepwater6

    Explaining

  • Members
  • 680 posts

Posted 24 April 2013 - 07:49 PM

That Wiki article has quite the description of the area under the history tab. It makes sense to me now. I incorrectly thought that from the original article they were saying it was one group who's markers had changed without a reason. I see now it was a totally different group coming in.

On another note about genes, I read a good story today in the Nat Geo issue from Jan 13' titled "Why we explore" It suggests that the variant known as DRD4-7R which is identified with 20 percent of humans may be responsible for the following. In the study people identified were more likely to take risks, explore new places, ideas, food, relationships, drugs, or even sexual opportunities.

The study also ties the 7R to human migrations, which according to the article, was the first time a study was able to connect those dots. Its not a surprise I guess when you think about it, but it also states people with this variant are also more likely to have ADHD.