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Are The Plans For Forced Vaccinations Of All Adults?


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#1 Thoth101

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Posted 02 April 2020 - 04:22 AM

My question is to you think the Powers That Be are going to try to push forced vaccinations on all adults? Here is an article.

 

The $1 billion bet: Pharma giant and U.S. government team up in all-out coronavirus vaccine push

https://www.sciencem...us-vaccine-push

 

Science’s COVID-19 reporting is supported by the Pulitzer Center.

The crowded race to develop a vaccine against the new coronavirus just received a potential billion-dollar boost: Johnson & Johnson (J&J) announced on 30 March that it and the U.S. government, through a military research agency, would together devote up to that amount to move a candidate product made by its Janssen division across the finish line.

 

Janssen’s vaccine is built around an engineered version of adenovirus 26 (Ad26), which normally causes common colds but has been disabled so that it cannot replicate. Company scientists stich into this Ad26 “vector” a gene for the surface protein from the new coronavirus spreading around the world. Janssen is testing this same Ad26 platform in vaccines against Ebola, HIV, respiratory syncytial virus, and Zika. J&J had $42 billion in pharmaceutical sales last year, making it the sixth largest big pharma company. Sanofi is the only other in the top 10 that has a COVID-19 vaccine project.

Florian Krammer, a researcher at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, who has co-authored a status report in Immunity about the COVID-19 vaccine field, says “it’s great” that a big pharma company like this has committed so much to the project, but he cautions against banking on any one effort. “The more the merrier—and I hope they’re successful—but the question is really whether they have an advantage over anyone else,” Krammer says.

 

Paul Stoffels, J&J’s chief scientific officer and a veteran HIV drug developer, spoke with Science yesterday from his home in Belgium, where he, like many others around the world trying to slow the spread of the coronavirus, is sheltered in place. He says the effort will be nonprofit and the vaccine will be accessible to all through some global mechanism still to be determined. “We’re not going to decide who will get the vaccine, because that’s not up to us. This has never happened before, so we have to invent something on how to do this,” he says. This interview had been edited for brevity and clarity. 

 

Q: The U.S. government, through the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) has committed $456 million to the Janssen effort and the company says it will commit roughly an equal amount. Will BARDA be doling out the money in installments if you meet milestones?

 

Q: What’s your capacity to produce vaccine for the world?

A: We can make 300 million vaccines, in a 2000-liter vessel, on an annual basis. We have one fully functioning facility now with a 2000-liter vessel, and we’re starting to set up the second one in the U.S. that will be ready by the end of the year. We’re talking to the vaccine companies in other parts of the world who have similar capabilities to see which ones we will bring on board as partners—or we might still consider doing something ourselves. We think we need to get to 1 billion doses, so we need four plants. And if we need more, we’ll adjust to bring more on board.

 


Edited by Thoth101, 02 April 2020 - 04:25 AM.


#2 VictorMedvil

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Posted 02 April 2020 - 04:45 AM

My question is to you think the Powers That Be are going to try to push forced vaccinations on all adults? Here is an article.

 

The $1 billion bet: Pharma giant and U.S. government team up in all-out coronavirus vaccine push

https://www.sciencem...us-vaccine-push

 

Science’s COVID-19 reporting is supported by the Pulitzer Center.

The crowded race to develop a vaccine against the new coronavirus just received a potential billion-dollar boost: Johnson & Johnson (J&J) announced on 30 March that it and the U.S. government, through a military research agency, would together devote up to that amount to move a candidate product made by its Janssen division across the finish line.

 

Janssen’s vaccine is built around an engineered version of adenovirus 26 (Ad26), which normally causes common colds but has been disabled so that it cannot replicate. Company scientists stich into this Ad26 “vector” a gene for the surface protein from the new coronavirus spreading around the world. Janssen is testing this same Ad26 platform in vaccines against Ebola, HIV, respiratory syncytial virus, and Zika. J&J had $42 billion in pharmaceutical sales last year, making it the sixth largest big pharma company. Sanofi is the only other in the top 10 that has a COVID-19 vaccine project.

Florian Krammer, a researcher at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, who has co-authored a status report in Immunity about the COVID-19 vaccine field, says “it’s great” that a big pharma company like this has committed so much to the project, but he cautions against banking on any one effort. “The more the merrier—and I hope they’re successful—but the question is really whether they have an advantage over anyone else,” Krammer says.

 

Paul Stoffels, J&J’s chief scientific officer and a veteran HIV drug developer, spoke with Science yesterday from his home in Belgium, where he, like many others around the world trying to slow the spread of the coronavirus, is sheltered in place. He says the effort will be nonprofit and the vaccine will be accessible to all through some global mechanism still to be determined. “We’re not going to decide who will get the vaccine, because that’s not up to us. This has never happened before, so we have to invent something on how to do this,” he says. This interview had been edited for brevity and clarity. 

 

Q: The U.S. government, through the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) has committed $456 million to the Janssen effort and the company says it will commit roughly an equal amount. Will BARDA be doling out the money in installments if you meet milestones?

 

Q: What’s your capacity to produce vaccine for the world?

A: We can make 300 million vaccines, in a 2000-liter vessel, on an annual basis. We have one fully functioning facility now with a 2000-liter vessel, and we’re starting to set up the second one in the U.S. that will be ready by the end of the year. We’re talking to the vaccine companies in other parts of the world who have similar capabilities to see which ones we will bring on board as partners—or we might still consider doing something ourselves. We think we need to get to 1 billion doses, so we need four plants. And if we need more, we’ll adjust to bring more on board.

 

Maybe they should employ forced vaccination ever thought about it that way?



#3 Thoth101

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Posted 02 April 2020 - 09:57 PM

Maybe they should employ forced vaccination ever thought about it that way?

Not until they correct the problems with vaccinations and better science behind it. We have our own antibodies in our bodies that learn to fight things when exposed to them. I feel it is against all human rights for governments or big pharma to tell you what must be put into our bodies. That would be an act of war and an act of terror against all humans and against anything or anybody that stands for freedom and the right to your own body.

 

Plus if people want to get vaccinated they should have the choice to do so. If they are vaccinated and it works why should they be afraid of people that aren't? It makes no sense for those people that believe in vaccines to be afraid of people that are not. They just want to control the people that don't believe in big pharma and their cancer, autism, dementia sticks.



#4 Thoth101

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Posted 03 April 2020 - 10:04 PM

This is interesting here.

 

Vaccine Hesitancy Among General Practitioners and Its Determinants During Controversies: A National Cross-sectional Survey in France

 

https://www.thelance...0047-5/fulltext

 

Interpretation
Our findings show that after repeated vaccine controversies in France, some VH exists among French GPs, whose recommendation behaviors depend on their trust in authorities, their perception of the utility and risks of vaccines, and their comfort in explaining them. Further research is needed to confirm these results among health care workers in other countries.

 

Over the past two decades several vaccine controversies have emerged in various countries, including France, inducing worries about severe adverse effects and eroding confidence in health authorities, experts, and science (Larson et al., 2011). These two dimensions are at the core of the vaccine hesitancy (VH) observed in the general population. VH is defined as delay in acceptance of vaccination, or refusal, or even acceptance with doubts about its safety and benefits, with all these behaviors and attitudes varying according to context, vaccine, and personal profile, despite the availability of vaccine services (Group, 2014, Larson et al., 2014, Dubé et al., 2013). VH presents a challenge to physicians who must address their patients' concerns about vaccines and ensure satisfactory vaccination coverage.

 

Although physicians are generally favorable to vaccination, some, especially those whose practice includes but is not limited to homeopathy or acupuncture, are known to be negative toward vaccination in general or toward some particular vaccines (Benin et al., 2006, Pulcini et al., 2013, François et al., 2011). Moreover, the percentage of physicians reporting doubts about the harmlessness of vaccines is growing (Dubé et al., 2013). Physicians may therefore share some of the same questions and concerns expressed by the general population (Poland, 2010) and distrust health authorities, just as the population does (Yaqub et al., 2014). These findings raise the question of whether doubts about vaccine safety and distrust of the health authorities might fuel VH among physicians. Vaccine-hesitant physicians are likely to recommend vaccines to their patients at lower rates and with less conviction than nonhesitant physicians



#5 Thoth101

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 04:30 AM

I figured this Propaganda was paid for by. You guessed it.

 

https://www.thelance...0678-8/fulltext

 

Acknowledgments
HJL is funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation as principal investigator for research on public confidence in immunisation. The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of their employers. We thank David Salisbury for providing data for figure 2 and for useful discussion on the paper; Anne Louise-Kinmonth for reviewing subsquent drafts; and Pauline Brocard, Lee Barker, Caitlin Jarret, Isaac Ghinai, Jay Dowle, Larry Madoff, Melissa Cumming, and Louise Paushter for researching case studies.