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Electromagnetic Pulse


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#1 chewylord389

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Posted 29 April 2017 - 01:05 PM

Hello everyone,

 

I hope everyone is doing well today. I recently came across a website called "Amazing1" where they sell EMP devices in which you can break electronics easily. There was one item that brought my attention called the "Low Power Pulse Gun"

 

http://www.amazing1....-pulse-gun.html

 

The description for this is as follows:

 

Low powered hand held pulse gun generates EMP electromagnetic pulses capable of de-programming and disrupting micro processor circuitry. Gun is built in a pistol configuration where the 8 "AA" batteries are housed in the butt section along with the push button trigger switch.

Directional device has adjustable pulse rate control and a built in emitter for close proximity applications. Specialized circuitry use our ultra low inductance high energy density capacitors with self triggering gap switch. Charging circuit uses our loss-less inductive charging and eliminates the losses associated with simple resistive methods. Pulse energy is approximately 1 Joule with a rep rate up to 30 pps. Charging voltage is over 5kv with a peak current of nearly 1000 amps now equal to a 5 megawatt pulse of power.

Out put terminals may be adapted for a wave guide for more precise applications or connection to an external antenna where you can experiment with maximizing "E" or "M" field for certain applications. Unit can be built in a military gray PVC enclosure measuring 10 to 12 inches. *Assembled units are sold only to qualified personnel who submit their order on a company letter head.

 

 

I'm not a very scientific individual, but these features are scary to say the least. I know this question may seem silly to most of you but I would just like to know if it would be possible with this device to aim amps and/or electricity in general at an individual person--in the same way that microwave beams can be aimed at an object or at an individual (ie. Active Denial System)? Can you create beams out of amps (or electrical current in general) using this device and aim it at an individual?

 

Thank you

Steven



#2 exchemist

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 11:04 AM

Hello everyone,

 

I hope everyone is doing well today. I recently came across a website called "Amazing1" where they sell EMP devices in which you can break electronics easily. There was one item that brought my attention called the "Low Power Pulse Gun"

 

http://www.amazing1....-pulse-gun.html

 

The description for this is as follows:

 

 

I'm not a very scientific individual, but these features are scary to say the least. I know this question may seem silly to most of you but I would just like to know if it would be possible with this device to aim amps and/or electricity in general at an individual person--in the same way that microwave beams can be aimed at an object or at an individual (ie. Active Denial System)? Can you create beams out of amps (or electrical current in general) using this device and aim it at an individual?

 

Thank you

Steven

I'm sure you can make a directional pulse with the right sort of emitter. However aiming at a person would be fairly pointless, unless your objective was to take out their mobile phone or knacker their digital watch. These pulses would not affect people, I'm fairly sure. Do the sellers indicate applications for his thing?


Edited by exchemist, 30 April 2017 - 11:04 AM.


#3 chewylord389

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 01:47 PM

I'm sure you can make a directional pulse with the right sort of emitter. However aiming at a person would be fairly pointless, unless your objective was to take out their mobile phone or knacker their digital watch. These pulses would not affect people, I'm fairly sure. Do the sellers indicate applications for his thing?

 

The sellers do not indicate that this can harm people. I know it's not directly related to the topic, but I know that they have microwave beams for all sorts of purposes, including shooting down drones, frying electronics etc.. You will also get thermal effects of you stand in the way between the microwave beam and the intended target due to the power of the beam. I'm thinking along these lines with regards to EMP weapons. I'm thinking that if you hit a person with this EMP weapon, you might just hurt them since I'm assuming that these pulses contain megawatts and apps.



#4 exchemist

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 02:08 PM

The sellers do not indicate that this can harm people. I know it's not directly related to the topic, but I know that they have microwave beams for all sorts of purposes, including shooting down drones, frying electronics etc.. You will also get thermal effects of you stand in the way between the microwave beam and the intended target due to the power of the beam. I'm thinking along these lines with regards to EMP weapons. I'm thinking that if you hit a person with this EMP weapon, you might just hurt them since I'm assuming that these pulses contain megawatts and apps.

I don't think so. They only talk of pulses of 1J, which is pretty feeble. Don't forget that a power rating is the rate of energy transmitted  per unit time, so you can easily get an instantenous power rating that looks impressive if it is just a modest amount of energy compressed into a fraction of a millisecond. For example, 1J transmitted in 1 millisec implies an instantaneous power rating of 1kW. Or if transmitted in a microsecond you get a power rating of 1MW. But it won't do you any harm, because in the end it is just 1J of energy, i.e. < 1/4  of a calorie, which is enough to heat 1 cc of water by 1/4 of a degree Celsius (say 1/2 deg F). As would be expected if the damned thing is powered by a few AA batteries!  


Edited by exchemist, 30 April 2017 - 02:11 PM.

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#5 chewylord389

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 01:27 PM

I don't think so. They only talk of pulses of 1J, which is pretty feeble. Don't forget that a power rating is the rate of energy transmitted  per unit time, so you can easily get an instantenous power rating that looks impressive if it is just a modest amount of energy compressed into a fraction of a millisecond. For example, 1J transmitted in 1 millisec implies an instantaneous power rating of 1kW. Or if transmitted in a microsecond you get a power rating of 1MW. But it won't do you any harm, because in the end it is just 1J of energy, i.e. < 1/4  of a calorie, which is enough to heat 1 cc of water by 1/4 of a degree Celsius (say 1/2 deg F). As would be expected if the damned thing is powered by a few AA batteries!  

 

Thank you for answering the question in a clear matter with regards to the joules and the physics around it. I have one last question if it's ok. I would also like to know if you can beam ampage, megawatts and the charging voltage in the same way that you can beam joules?



#6 billvon

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 01:38 PM

Thank you for answering the question in a clear matter with regards to the joules and the physics around it. I have one last question if it's ok. I would also like to know if you can beam ampage, megawatts and the charging voltage in the same way that you can beam joules?

Those are all very different things.

 

In an electrical discharge (i.e. a spark gap) current flows.  However you can't really "beam" it - it goes from high to low potential, not in a straight line.

 

Megawatt is a unit of power.  Watts are volts times amps.  Thus, again, in a spark gap you have a current, and a difference in potential from one terminal to the other, so you could express a spark gap with units of watts (or megawatts.)

 

The "charging voltage" depends on the design of whatever you're building.

 

You can "beam joules" by converting electrical power to EM radiation (anywhere from tens of hertz to hundreds of terahertz, which is light.)



#7 chewylord389

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 02:54 PM

Those are all very different things.

 

In an electrical discharge (i.e. a spark gap) current flows.  However you can't really "beam" it - it goes from high to low potential, not in a straight line.

 

Megawatt is a unit of power.  Watts are volts times amps.  Thus, again, in a spark gap you have a current, and a difference in potential from one terminal to the other, so you could express a spark gap with units of watts (or megawatts.)

 

The "charging voltage" depends on the design of whatever you're building.

 

You can "beam joules" by converting electrical power to EM radiation (anywhere from tens of hertz to hundreds of terahertz, which is light.)

 

I understand that these are different variables, but my question is if these units of measurement can be beamed in the same way that you can beam a microwave or a laser at a specific direction. Does electric current mean that watts, megawatts and kilovolts are strictly positioned in electronic wires and therefore are not present and cannot be detected anywhere outside electric wires?



#8 billvon

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 08:51 AM

I understand that these are different variables, but my question is if these units of measurement can be beamed in the same way that you can beam a microwave or a laser at a specific direction. Does electric current mean that watts, megawatts and kilovolts are strictly positioned in electronic wires and therefore are not present and cannot be detected anywhere outside electric wires?

No, units of measurement cannot be beamed.  If you want to measure the energy of a beam, different units apply based on what you're trying to measure. 

 

For a very high frequency beam, both E and H fields are propagating (far field propagation.)  These are often measured in watts per square meter, since they are readily converted to heat upon striking the surface of an object.

 

For lower frequency, watts per square centimeter are often used, since they penetrate more deeply.

 

To measure the power of the beam itself, often measurements of the E or H fields are made directly.  For example, dBu is a measurement of electric field intensity in microvolts per meter.

 

For low frequencies or very close to the source, you can decouple E and H fields, and measure both in volts per meter or amps per meter.


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#9 chewylord389

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 01:35 PM

No, units of measurement cannot be beamed.  If you want to measure the energy of a beam, different units apply based on what you're trying to measure. 

 

For a very high frequency beam, both E and H fields are propagating (far field propagation.)  These are often measured in watts per square meter, since they are readily converted to heat upon striking the surface of an object.

 

For lower frequency, watts per square centimeter are often used, since they penetrate more deeply.

 

To measure the power of the beam itself, often measurements of the E or H fields are made directly.  For example, dBu is a measurement of electric field intensity in microvolts per meter.

 

For low frequencies or very close to the source, you can decouple E and H fields, and measure both in volts per meter or amps per meter.

 

Thanks for the informative answer. So based on what we've discussed, we can come to the conclusion to the low power pulse gun I cited in the first post is only meant to cause certain disruptions in devices. So like....if you were to aim it in a particulat direction, and a person is headed in the direction to which you're aiming the device, there would be no damage to that person or any other ill effects, but only disruptions on the electrical objects that they may be carrying like cell phones. Would this be a correct statement?


Edited by chewylord389, 02 May 2017 - 01:39 PM.


#10 billvon

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 05:37 PM

Thanks for the informative answer. So based on what we've discussed, we can come to the conclusion to the low power pulse gun I cited in the first post is only meant to cause certain disruptions in devices. So like....if you were to aim it in a particulat direction, and a person is headed in the direction to which you're aiming the device, there would be no damage to that person or any other ill effects, but only disruptions on the electrical objects that they may be carrying like cell phones. Would this be a correct statement?

That's the claim.  EMP can damage electronic devices without harming people.  Whether this device lives up to that claim, of course, isn't known yet.



#11 chewylord389

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Posted 03 May 2017 - 02:03 PM

That's the claim.  EMP can damage electronic devices without harming people.  Whether this device lives up to that claim, of course, isn't known yet.

 

I'm actually not entirely sure about that. I found a video on Youtube where someone tests a device that looks like the one I showed on my very first post.

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=wujJ-eyacWg

 

Do you think it's the same device in question?



#12 sunbeam667

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Posted 15 May 2017 - 01:45 PM

Hello everyone,
 
Maybe someone good at this topic or met this problem before, because I was really confused reading about this: 
 
 
Can someone tell me: does it actually work? And how terahertz radiation can influence on the human body, considering that THz waves passing through variety of things, such as plastics, ceramics, composites etc.? Thanks in advance!


#13 billvon

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Posted 15 May 2017 - 02:17 PM

Can someone tell me: does it actually work? And how terahertz radiation can influence on the human body, considering that THz waves passing through variety of things, such as plastics, ceramics, composites etc.? Thanks in advance!

 

Yes, it actually works. 

 

THz radiation can indeed influence the human body.  You may have some experience with EM radiation at frequencies around 400 terahertz; we generally call this "light."  Indeed, higher frequencies than that (i.e. ultraviolet) can cause painful radiation burns; we call this "sunburn."


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