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Ginseng, Korean by Douglas Dupler

 

Korean ginseng is one of the most widely used and acclaimed herbs in the world. Its scientific name is Panax ginseng, which is the species from which Chinese, Korean, red, and white ginseng are produced. Chinese and Korean ginseng are the same plant cultivated in different regions, and have slightly different properties according to Chinese medicine. White ginseng is simply the dried or powdered root of Korean ginseng, while red ginseng is the same root that is steamed and dried in heat or sunlight. Red ginseng is said to be slightly stronger and more stimulating in the body than white, according to Chinese herbalism.

 

Korean ginseng has had a long and illustrious history as an herb for health, and has been used for thousands of years throughout the Orient as a medicine and tonic. Early Chinese medicine texts written in the first century A.D. mention ginseng, and ginseng has long been classified by Chinese medicine as a "superior" herb. This means it is said to promote longevity and vitality. Legends around the world have touted ginseng as an aphrodisiac and sexual tonic. Researchers have found a slight connection between sex drive and consuming ginseng, although a direct link and the mechanism of action are still researched and disputed.

 

Korean ginseng grows on moist, shaded mountainsides in China, Korea, and Russia. It is a perennial herb that reaches heights of two or more feet, and is distinguished by its dark green leaves and red clusters of berries. The root of the plant is the part valued for its medicinal properties. The root is long and slender and sometimes resembles the shape of the human body. Asian legends claim that this "man-root" has magical powers for those lucky enough to afford or find it, and the roots bearing the closest resemblance to the human body are still the most valuable ones. The word ren shen in Chinese means roughly "the essence of the earth in the shape of a man."

 

Korean ginseng has historically been one of the most expensive of herbs, as it has been highly in demand in China and the Far East for centuries. Wars have been fought in Asia over lands where it grew wild. Wild Korean ginseng is now nearly extinct from many regions. Single roots of wild plants have recently been auctioned in China and New York City for sums approaching $50,000. Most of the world's supply of Korean ginseng is cultivated by farmers in Korea and China.

 

Because of the number of herbs sold under the name of ginseng, there can be some confusion for the consumer. Korean ginseng is a member of the Araliaceae family of plants, which also includes closely related American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) and Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus). Both American and Siberian ginseng are considered by Chinese herbalists to be different herbs than Korean ginseng, and are said to have different effects and healing properties in the body. To add more confusion, there are eight herbs in Chinese medicine which are sometimes called ginseng, including black ginseng, purple ginseng, and prince's ginseng, some of which are not at all botanically related to Panax ginseng, so consumers should choose ginseng products with awareness.

 

General use

The word panax is formed from Greek roots meaning "cure-all," and Panax ginseng has long been considered to be one of the great healing and strengthening herbs in natural medicine. Ginseng is classified as an adaptogen, which is a substance that helps the body adapt to stress and balance itself without causing major side effects. Korean ginseng is used as a tonic for improving overall health and stamina, and Chinese herbalists particularly recommend it for the ill, weak, or elderly. Korean ginseng has long been asserted to have longevity, anti-senility, and memory improvement effects in the aged population. As it helps the body to adapt to stress, athletes may use ginseng as herbal support during rigorous training. Korean ginseng generally increases physical and mental energy. It is a good tonic for the adrenal glands, and is used by those suffering from exhaustion, burnout, or debilitation from chronic illness.

 

Traditional Chinese medicine also prescribes Korean ginseng to treat diabetes, and research has shown that it enhances the release of insulin from the pancreas and lowers blood sugar levels. Korean ginseng has been demonstrated to lower blood cholesterol levels. It has also been shown to have antioxidant effects and to increase immune system activity, which makes it a good herbal support for those suffering from cancer and AIDS and other chronic conditions that impair the immune system. Further uses of Korean ginseng in Chinese medicine include treatment of impotence, asthma, and digestive weakness.

 

Research

Scientists have isolated what they believe are the primary active ingredients in ginseng, chemicals termed saponin triterpenoid glycosides, or commonly called ginsenocides. There are nearly 30 ginsenocides in Korean ginseng. Much research on Korean ginseng has been conducted in China, but controlled human experiments with it have not been easily accessible to the English-speaking world. Recent research in China was summarized by Dr. C. Lui in the February 1992 issue of the Journal of Ethnopharmacology, where he wrote that Panax ginseng was found to contain 28 ginsenocides that "act on the central nervous system, cardiovascular system and endocrine secretion, promote immune function, and have effects on anti-aging and relieving stress."

 

To summarize other research, Korean ginseng has been shown in studies to have significant effects for the following.

 

Physical improvement and performance enhancement for athletes: A study performed over three years in Germany showed athletes given ginseng had favorable improvement in several categories over a control group who took a placebo. Another 1982 study showed that athletes given ginseng had improved oxygen intake and faster recovery time than those given placebos.

Mental performance improvement and mood enhancement: In general, studies show that ginseng enhances mental performance, learning time, and memory. One study of sixteen volunteers showed improvement on a wide variety of mental tests, including mathematics. Another study showed that those performing intricate and mentally demanding tasks improved performance when given Korean ginseng. Finally, a study has shown improvement of mood in depression sufferers with the use of ginseng.

Antifatigue and antistress actions: Patients with chronic fatigue who were given ginseng showed a statistically significant improvement in physical tests and in mental attention and concentration, when compared with those given placebos.

Lowering blood sugar: Animal studies have shown that ginseng can facilitate the release of insulin from the pancreas and increase the number of insulin receptors in the body.

Antioxidant properties: Scientific analysis of ginseng has shown that it has antioxidant effects, similar to the effects of vitamins A, C, and E. Thus, ginseng could be beneficial in combating the negative effects of pollution, radiation, and aging.

Cholesterol reduction: Some studies have shown that Korean ginseng reduces total cholesterol and increases levels of good cholesterol in the body.

Anticancer effects and immune system stimulation: Several tests have shown that Korean ginseng increases immune cell activity in the body, including the activity of T-cells and lymphocytes, which are instrumental in fighting cancer and other immune system disorders like AIDS. A Korean study indicates that taking ginseng may reduce the chances of getting cancer, as a survey of more than 1,800 patients in a hospital in Seoul showed that those who did not have cancer were more likely to have taken ginseng regularly than those patients who had contracted cancer.

Physical and mental improvement in the elderly: One study showed significant improvement in an elderly test group in visual and auditory reaction time and cardiopulmonary function when given controlled amounts of Korean ginseng. Korean ginseng has also been shown to alleviate symptoms of menopause.

Impotence: Studies of human sexual function and Korean ginseng have been generally inconclusive, despite the wide acclaim of ginseng as a sexual tonic. Tests with lab animals and ginseng have shown some interesting results, indicating that Korean ginseng promotes the growth of male reproductive organs, increases sperm and testoterone levels, and increases sexual activity in laboratory animals. In general, scientists believe the link between ginseng and sex drive is due to ginseng's effect of strengthening overall health and balancing the hormonal system.

 

Preparations

Korean ginseng can be purchased as whole roots, powder, liquid extracts, and tea. Roots should be sliced and boiled in water for up to 45 minutes to extract all the beneficial nutrients. One to five grams of dry root is the recommended amount for one serving of tea. Herbalists recommend that ginseng not be boiled in metal pots, to protect its antioxidant properties. Ginseng should be taken between meals for best assimilation.

 

Some high quality Korean ginseng extracts and products are standardized to contain a specified amount of ginsenosides. The recommended dosage for extracts containing four to eight percent of ginsenosides is 100 mg once or twice daily. The recommended dosage for non-standardized root powder or extracts is 1-2 g daily, taken in capsules or as a tea. It is recommended that ginseng be taken in cycles and not continuously; after each week of taking ginseng, a few days without ingesting the herb should be observed. Likewise, Korean ginseng should not be taken longer than two months at a time, after which one month's rest period should be allowed before resuming the cycle again. Chinese herbalists recommend that ginseng be taken primarily in the autumn and winter months.

 

Precautions

Consumers should be aware of the different kinds of ginseng, and which type is best suited for them. Red Korean ginseng is considered stronger and more stimulating than white, wild ginseng is stronger than cultivated, and Korean ginseng is generally believed to be slightly stronger than Chinese. Furthermore, American and Siberian ginseng have slightly different properties than Korean ginseng, and consumers should make an informed choice as to which herb is best suited for them. Chinese herbalists do not recommend Korean ginseng for those people who have "heat" disorders in their bodies, such as ulcers, high blood pressure, tension headaches, and symptoms associated with high stress levels. Korean ginseng is generally not recommended for those with symptoms of nervousness, mental imbalance, inflammation, or fever. Korean ginseng is not recommended for pregnant or lactating women, and women of childbearing age should use ginseng sparingly, as some studies imply that it can influence estrogen levels. Also, Chinese herbalists typically only prescribe ginseng to older people or the weak, as they believe that younger and stronger people do not benefit as much from it and ginseng is "wasted on the young."

 

Because of the number of and demand for ginseng products on the market, consumers should search for a reputable brand, preferably with a standardized percentage of active ingredients. To illustrate the mislabeling found with some ginseng products, Consumer Reports magazine analyzed ten nationally-distributed ginseng products in 1995. They found that several of them lacked significant amounts of ginsenocides, despite claims on the packaging to the contrary. Ginseng fraud has led the American Botanical Council, publisher of HerbalGram magazine, to initiate the Ginseng Evaluation Program, a comprehensive study and standardization of ginseng products on the American market. This study and its labeling standards are still under development, and consumers should watch for it.

 

Side effects

Korean ginseng acts as a slight stimulant in the body, and in some cases can cause overstimulation, irritability, nervousness and insomnia, although strong side effects are generally rare. Taking too high a dosage of ginseng, or taking ginseng for too long without a break, can cause ginseng intoxication, for which symptoms might include headaches, insomnia, seeing spots, dizziness, shortage of breath and gastrointestinal discomfort. Long term use may cause menstrual abnormalities and breast tenderness in some women.

Interactions

Those taking hormonal drugs should use ginseng with care. Ginseng should not be taken with caffeine or other stimulants as these may increase its stimulatory effects and cause uncomfortable side effects.

 

Key Terms

Adaptogen : Substance that improves the body's ability to adapt to stress.

Ginsenocide : Active substances found in ginseng.

 

Further Reading

For Your Information

 

Books

 

• Duke, J.A. Ginseng: A Concise Handbook. Algonac, MI: Reference Publications, 1989.

• Foster, S. and Chongxi, Y. Herbal Emissaries. Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 1992.

• Fulder, Stephan. The Book of Ginseng and Other Chinese Herbs for Vitality. Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 1993.

• Hobbs, Christopher. Ginseng: The Energy Herb. Loveland, CO: Botanica Press, 1996.

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Yungen,

On Korean Ginseng; What is your opinion?

 

Is there a difference between liquid vials that you can buy, and capsules?

In terms of manufacturing and potency and quality?

 

What are the better brands?

 

Do you recommend taking Korean Ginseng?

 

:)

 

I have no doubt on efficacy of Korean Ginseng and of course I do recommend taking Korean Ginseng.

It is important that you have to select Korean Origin-I mean Korean Ginseng is different from other ginseng. I have no experience on the other ginseng.

We Koreans have been used Korean ginseng as a cordial medicine for very long long time.

 

Korean herbal doctor recommend that you taking Korean ginseng by warm liquid state. Capsule or tablet, suspension are ok!

 

There are many Korean ginseng products manufacturing company and they are almost similar but I like best 'Korean Red Ginseng Extract" which made by Korea Ginseng Corp. http://www.kgc.or.kr/new_eng/index.html

 

If you are interested in above product I can help you because I know QA manager of the company.

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There are many Korean ginseng products manufacturing company and they are almost similar but I like best 'Korean Red Ginseng Extract" which made by Korea Ginseng Corp. http://www.kgc.or.kr/new_eng/index.html

 

If you are interested in above product I can help you because I know QA manager of the company.

 

Thats good to know, Thank You :hihi:

 

Gheong-Kwan-Jang brand.

 

I sometimes buy "Prince of Peace" Red Panax Ginseng ( in little vials), a Hong Kong company. They are aged too.

But I suppose that it is different from Korean Ginseng?

 

There is Siberian Ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus)

and American Ginseng (Panax quinquefolius)

 

Siberian Ginseng is not technically a Ginseng :) but has many of the same properties and effects.

 

I'll look around for some Korean Ginseng here. There are several good Asian Herbal and Supply stores.

 

I think Ginseng is good. :hihi: If the quality is good, and properly aged.

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DONG QUAI (Angelica sinensis)

 

This herb id dubbed "female Ginseng" because of its all purpose benefits for female gynecological complaints.

For centuries, Chinese women have used this herb to regulate menstrual cycles and help with the pain. :confused:

 

Its rich in viatamins and minerals. including A, B12, and E

Dong quai has also been/is used for helping with high-blood pressure and insomnia...

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DONG QUAI (Angelica sinensis)

This herb id dubbed "female Ginseng" because of its all purpose benefits for female gynecological complaints.

For centuries, Chinese women have used this herb to regulate menstrual cycles and help with the pain. ;)

.

A Western equivalent is " Chaste Tree" or Vitex Agnus Castus. A pretty, small tree or large shrub. The seeds regulate the menstrual cycle (in ways as a mere male does not understand something about progesterone/estrogen levels)

Interestingly in the middle Ages it was Called "Monk's Pepper" as the seeds were ground up like pepper and put in the chaste monk's food as an anaphrodisiac (well you try and spell it).

Thus the monks were helped to remain chaste and pure of mind and body.:shrug:

 

Do you think there are any marketing possibilities for it?;)

Michael

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A Western equivalent is " Chaste Tree" or Vitex Agnus Castus.

Do you think there are any marketing possibilities for it?:)

Michael

 

yeah.

Like Angelica has the same to do with your Angelica name sake?.

 

Is it a coincidence?? :D

I high-ly doubt it :)

 

:)

 

I'm glad people are interested in herbs. ;)

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Leaving Angelica aside for a moment. There is a story I would like to tell you.

 

When I owned a herb nursery an old man came to talk to me. He was holding a plant which he called "Candelabra". I had never seen it before. He told me the story of this plant, how it had cured his incurable arthritic pain and gave me a little leaflet that he had written about "Candelabra".

He was on a one-man mission to give plants away and to tell others about the plant. He begged me to try it, propagate it and tell others about it.

 

I did grow it. It turned out to be "Candelabra Aloe (Aloe arborescens)"

Whenever I encountered a customer with painful arthritis in the hand joints I would break a bit of Candelabra off and invite them to try it, to see if it eased their pain. It contains a lot of watery sap.

Invariably within five minutes the customer would comeback saying their pain had gone and could they please have a plant. (Yes I know all about the placebo effect!)

 

I don't think there is anything in any herb book about this.

Nor is there anything on the web. I never saw the Old man again.

So I would like to put it here in memory of the Unknown Old Man.

 

His printed handout goes like this:-

 

"

CANDELABRA

(Arborescens)

The sap from the leaves of this plant has proved very effective in stopping the pains of Sciatica, Lumbago, Gout, Rheumatics, Tendinitis, Arthritis, RSI, Sinus and Migraine Headaches, Hangovers, Burns, Sunburns, Spurs, Bunions, Asthma, MS, Perforated Veins, Trigger Finger, Strokes, Stings, Neuralgia, Planters Wart, all types of Industrial and Sporting Injuries, Tired and Aching Muscles of Feet,Legs, Back, Arms and Neck, Chilblains, Bronchitis, Shingles - in fact, its been used on all pains.

DIRECTIONS

Split leaf and put juice on affected spot until pain ceases. The pain should stop almost immediately. For chronic pain put a leaf in Juice Extractor, this makes a stronger mix. Keep in refrigerator and shake well before using. It can be used on Poultice. Pain and stiffness should be gone the next day. At night a light smear of Soluble Cream or Ointment keeps Lineament in and allows sleep.

Directions for sceptics -SUFFER

Most medicines come from plants so there is no reason why one cannot be grown locally. The plant is found in gardens of suburban homes in temperate climates and most people are glad to give you a slip as it grows easily. It can and WILL finally be used by orthodox medicine.

As with recognised medicines some people may suffer a slight reaction (three in five years).

Someone you know is suffering unnecessary pain. Help them by photocopying this and posting it to them."

 

So there it is. I have used his capitalisation and emphasis. In the original pamphlet there was a grey scale picture of the Aloe. I'm sure you can find a photo on the net. The aloe can become huge. My new neighbour- bar one- has one huge clump seven foot high and 14 foot wide!! He obviously doesn't have any aches and pains.

I hope you, or someone you know, can make use of the Old Man's information.

 

Michael

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Hello everyone!:lol:

 

I am new to this thread but not to Hypography.;)

 

Today, accidentally i hit this thread and LOL, what wonderful information people have been sharing here!

 

My compliments to you Racoon for starting this thread! :hihi:

 

Well I do have some information to share, I have had some experience with some medicinal herbs, for example Basil leaves are very popular in Indian culture.

 

Then there are this set of about 34 remedies, known by the name Bach remedies. They are infact extracts of some flowers, and I could see some names in this thread too. These remedies are especially useful for minor mental disorders, for example impatience (in fact there is a remedy by that name.:)

 

I'll post on this forum more often now:) So be ready!!

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Hello everyone!:hihi:

 

Then there are this set of about 34 remedies, known by the name Bach remedies. They are infact extracts of some flowers, and I could see some names in this thread too. These remedies are especially useful for minor mental disorders, for example impatience (in fact there is a remedy by that name.:lol:

 

I'll post on this forum more often now:) So be ready!!

Bach remedies are similar to Homeopathic remedies.

There is very little science in them.

 

Still some people sear by Bach's Rescue Remedy for shock and

Queen Elizabeth's doctor is a homeopath.

They both (Homeopathy and Bach) certainly meet the Hippocratic oath's proscription "First do no harm"

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I am new to this thread but not to Hypography.:)

 

Well I do have some information to share, I have had some experience with some medicinal herbs,

 

Yes! Hallen Good Buddy :lol:

 

Your advice on Ayurveda would be most welcome... :hihi:

 

Amalaki (phyllanthus emblica)

Ashwagandha (Withania somniforal)

Brahmi (Hydrocotyle asiatica)

Guduchi (Tinosphora cordifolia)

Shanka Pupsi (Convolvulus mycrophyllus)

Vacha (acorus calamus)

 

????

 

In case you didn't know, Hallen has also started some other great threads on topics of health and wellness...such as this one

http://hypography.com/forums/biology/6303-do-substances-enter-our-body-affect.html?highlight=substances+that+enter+our+body

 

His advice is considered grade A in my little book.

and I love basil. I grow it every year! just for the smell

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Bach remedies are similar to Homeopathic remedies.

There is very little science in them.

 

Since science is not constant for all time, there is no value in the judgement that something has science in it or not.:confused:

 

Take for example, the medicications prescribed in Ayurveda, the medical world is slowly awakening to the fact that they often work, and are invariably less harmful then many allopathic drugs.

 

How did Ayurveda develop? Not by controlled experiments modern pharmacs swear by, but by long painstaking experience of some wise sages.

 

So, the methods employed by the modern pharmacs are in no way the ultimate methods to discover substances in nature that are useful for human body. Careful, painstaking observation of the suffering body and its reaction to things around can often provide useful clues!:hihi: :rant: :cup:

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  • 2 weeks later...

Since I have radishes under cultivation, I thought to have a look at their nutritional/medicinal properties. Seems a lot of discrepency among sources e.g. some say iron is a major mineral & others have it minor. Most agree on the Vitamin C, & one attributes it with antibacterial properties. No one mentions eating the greens that I have found yet.

Here's the links I reviewed:

http://www.mercola.com/nutritionplan/foodalert.htm#radishes

http://www.vegez.com/shopper/fruits_veg.asp

http://www.dole5aday.com/ReferenceCenter/NutritionCenter/Chart/R_NutrChart.jsp

http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-B00001-01c20g2.html

 

:shrug:

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Nice Post Hallen! :eek: good info../ :) (is that a variety of Basil? because there are many..)

 

ANGELICA (Angelica archangelica)

 

This herb was named after the famed Archangel Rafael, according to 10th century French legend, revealed the secret of this herb during a plague epidemic.

 

Angelica is a very versatile herb. :)

Its for indigestion, stomach upsets, and is used as an expectorant. :)

 

It has a warming effect on the body, and is also used by women to alleviate painful menstrual cramps..

It may also relieve pain due from rheumatism..

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This is like a game of chess.:eek:

Forcing my hand eh?:)

 

God's messenger is Michael the Archangel.

His day is the eighth of may (my wife's birthday)

 

It is "Angelica Archangelica' or 'angel of the archangels' the chief of Angels' herb.

 

I like the folklore of herbs.

I think it is important to preserve as it gives, sometimes hidden, clues to the possible uses of the plant.

It is not just silly superstition. It is often our oral tradition

 

Angelica was a pagan herb of great power.

It was probably a very secret "woman's herb" as it helped bring down menses and could induce abortion. one of the reasons information on it is sometimes difficult to find

Remember Micheal is closely connected with conception in christian folklore.

it is he who appeared to Mary and told her she was pregnant.

Michael the Angel gave the herb to man to prevent all his ills.

 

There are a number of varieties. Medicinally it is now mainly used in China

(The Chinese have a c2,000 year old written herb tradition!)

 

When I unpack all my books I will tell you more.

I have forgotten more than I remember about herbs

 

The web is very poor on folklore of herbs but here are a few gleanings:-

(Maude Grieve is always a good source on line too)

 

 

In Couriand, Livonia and the low lakelands of Pomerania and East Prussia, wild-growing Angelica abounds; there, in early summer-time, it has been the custom among the peasants to march into the towns carrying the Angelica flower-stems and to offer them for sale, chanting some ancient ditty in Lettish words, so antiquated as to be unintelligible even to the singers themselves. The chanted words and the tune are learnt in childhood, and may be attributed to a survival of some Pagan festival with which the plant was originally associated. After the introduction of Christianity, the plant became linked in the popular mind with some archangelic patronage, and associated with the spring-time festival of the Annunciation. According to one legend, Angelica was revealed in a dream by an angel to cure the plague. Another explanation of the name of this plant is that it blooms on the day of Michael the Archangel (May 8, old style), and is on that account a preservative against evil spirits and witchcraft: all parts of the plant were believed efficacious against spells and enchantment. It was held in such esteem that it was called 'The Root of the Holy Ghost.'

 

Much of the herbal medicine was practiced in monasteries where angelica was called Spiritus sancti radix, the root of the Holy Ghost. The botanical name was taken from the common lore that the plant bloomed on or about the day of Michael the Archangel (May 8th, Old Style Julian, prior to 1582). It means "messenger, chief of messengers" because the plant was believed to be given to mankind as a preservative against evil spirits.

 

In Gerard's The Herbal (1633), "The root of garden Angelica is a singular remedy against poison, and against the plague, and all infections taken by evil and corrupt air...is available against witchcraft and enchantments, if a man carry the same about them...is right beneficial to the heart: it cureth the bitings of mad dogs, and all other venomous beasts."

Angelica has been used for toothaches, headaches, fever, colds, and as an expectorant. It has been shown to have some antimicrobial activity, but the herbal tea was probably more soothing than medicinal.

The essential oils of angelica are an ingredient in several herbal cough remedies and in soaps, shampoos, and perfumes. Angelica stems are candied and often served after dinner to settle the stomach. The flavoring of angelica is used in desserts as well as in benedictine, chartreuse, gin, and vermouth.

 

This large variety, Angelica Archangelica (Linn.), also known as Archangelica officinalis, is grown abundantly near London in moist fields, for the use of its candied stems. It is largely cultivated for medicinal purposes in Thuringia, and the roots are also imported from Spain.

 

---History---Its virtues are praised by old writers, and the name itself, as well as the folk-lore of all North European countries and nations, testify to the great antiquity of a belief in its merits as a protection against contagion, for purifying the blood, and for curing every conceivable malady: it was held a sovereign remedy for poisons agues and all infectious maladies. In Couriand, Livonia and the low lakelands of Pomerania and East Prussia, wild-growing Angelica abounds; there, in early summer-time, it has been the custom among the peasants to march into the towns carrying the Angelica flower-stems and to offer them for sale, chanting some ancient ditty in Lettish words, so antiquated as to be unintelligible even to the singers themselves. The chanted words and the tune are learnt in childhood, and may be attributed to a survival of some Pagan festival with which the plant was originally associated. After the introduction of Christianity, the plant became linked in the popular mind with some archangelic patronage, and associated with the spring-time festival of the Annunciation. According to one legend, Angelica was revealed in a dream by an angel to cure the plague. Another explanation of the name of this plant is that it blooms on the day of Michael the Archangel (May 8, old style), and is on that account a preservative against evil spirits and witchcraft: all parts of the plant were believed efficacious against spells and enchantment. It was held in such esteem that it was called 'The Root of the Holy Ghost.'

 

 

Angelica Root (also known as Holy Ghost Root, Archangel Root, and Dong Quai)

is widely thought to be a powerful Guardian and Healer, and to provide Strength

to Women. We believe that Angelica Root is used by many people for the purpose of

Warding Off Evil and bringing Good Luck in Health and Family Matters.

 

As an ancient and highly aromatic plant, angelica is praised in the folklore

of northern Europe countries as a panacea for all ills. The name probably comes

from the Greek angelos, meaning ¡°messenger.¡± There is a legend that an angel re

vealed to a monk in a dream that the herb was a cure for the plague, and traditionally angelica was considered the most effective safeguard against evil, witchcraft in particular.

 

And for a modern twist

 

http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/4/19

 

Anodyne; Antiinflammatory; Antirheumatic; Carminative; Emmenagogue; Nervine; Vasodilator.(Is there anything else it could be used for?)

The roots and rhizomes are anodyne, anti-inflammatory, antirheumatic, carminative, nervine and vasodilator[147, 176]. A decoction is used to promote menstruation[218], to treat rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatism, headache, toothache and abscesses[147]. This herb is used medicinally in the same ways

 

--

Michael (not the angel):)

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